Ver-Vir - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
VERDANT...........2
And her first footsteps touch'd a verdant hill; Imitation of Spenser, Line 2
And stirr'd them faintly. Verdant cave and cell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 678
 
VERDICT...........2
A verdict ten-times sworn! Awake - awake- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 146
With liquor and the staircase: verdict - found stone dead. The Jealousies, Line 630
 
VERDURE...........5
Slopings of verdure through the glassy tide, Imitation of Spenser, Line 29
To see no other verdure that its own; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 2
Upon soft verdure saw, one here, one there, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 385
Frosted the springing verdure of his heart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 188
Then, lighting on the printless verdure , turn'd Lamia, Part I, Line 131
 
VERDUROUS.........3
Stole through its verdurous matting of fresh trees. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 420
Into the verdurous bosoms of those isles. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 58
Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 40
 
VERGE.............4
I see you are treading the verge of the sea: To Some Ladies, Line 14
And dropt my vision to the horizon's verge ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 590
The name of Arethusa. On the verge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1012
Of melody, and streams of flowery verge ,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 4
 
VERILIE...........1
Bot I must tellen verilie The Eve of St. Mark, Line 111
 
VERILY............2
The delicatest air: air verily , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 882
So witless of their doom, that verily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 492
 
VERMEIL...........6
Before the daisies, vermeil rimm'd and white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 50
Of dying fish; the vermeil rose had blown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 696
The natural hue of health, from vermeil lips?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 148
Thy beauty's shield, heart-shap'd and vermeil dyed? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 336
And like a rose in vermeil tint and shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 209
Flush every thing that hath a vermeil hue, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 14
 
VERMILION.........2
Vermilion -tail'd, or finn'd with silvery gauze; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 111
Vermilion -spotted, golden, green, and blue; Lamia, Part I, Line 48
 
VERMILLION........1
On sands, or in great deeps, vermillion turn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 20
 
VERMIN............1
Like crannied vermin ,- no! but fresh, and young, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
 
VERSE.............16
Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong, To George Felton Mathew, Line 1
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 108
And many a verse from so strange influence Sleep and Poetry, Line 69
Many and many a verse I hope to write, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 49
These sorry pages; then the verse would soar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 719
For one so weak to venture his poor verse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 938
Would offer a burnt sacrifice of verse Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 9
But it is done - succeed the verse or fail- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 157
To stead thee as a verse in English tongue, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 159
Leaving great verse unto a little clan? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 8
And kingdom over all the realms of verse Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 7
Verse , fame, and beauty are intense indeed, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 13
For lo! 'tis for the Father of all verse . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 13
And but the flitter-winged verse must tell, Lamia, Part I, Line 394
And careless hectorers in proud bad verse . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 208
O ease my heart of verse and let me rest; To Fanny, Line 2
 
VERSES............5
With lofty periods when my verses fire him, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 79
Of my rough verses not an hour misspent; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 82
Verses from which the soul would never wean: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 108
Their verses tallied. Easy was the task: Sleep and Poetry, Line 199
for verses fit to live. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
VERTUMNUS.........1
Sent me by sad Vertumnus , when his fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 445
 
VESPER............9
Vesper , the beauty-crest of summer weather; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 363
And Vesper , risen star, began to throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 485
To Vesper , for a taper silver-clear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 704
Therefore for her these vesper -carols are. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 834
The vesper hymn, far swollen, soft and full, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 967
To even song and vesper prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 18
Call'd Vesper , who with silver veil Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 52
And the beams of still Vesper , when winds are all whist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 98
Or Vesper , amorous glow-worm of the sky; Ode to Psyche, Line 27
 
VESPER'S..........2
Ah! surely that light peeps from Vesper's eye, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 78
At Vesper's earliest twinkle - they are gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 915
 
VESPERS...........3
The soft vespers to herself You say you love; but with a voice, Line 3
And constant as her vespers would he watch, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 21
Anon his heart revives: her vespers done, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 226
 
VESSEL............2
A gallant vessel : soon she seem'd to sink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 648
Stood a cool vessel of transparent juice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 42
 
VESSEL'S..........1
The tempest came: I saw that vessel's shrouds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 656
 
VESSELS...........3
To goodly vessels ; many a sail of pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 20
Of Ceres' horn, and, in huge vessels , wine Lamia, Part II, Line 187
Store of strange vessels , and large draperies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 73
 
VEST..............3
Of thy broidered, floating vest Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 45
Thy shepherd vest , and woo thee mid fresh leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 700
His purple vest , that ever peeping was The Jealousies, Line 266
 
VESTA.............1
I'll kneel to Vesta , for a flame of fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 701
 
VESTAL............2
Like vestal primroses, but dark velvet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 874
Of such a beauteous vestal . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89a
 
VESTIBULE.........2
He met within the murmurous vestibule Lamia, Part II, Line 163
Stunning the vestibule from wall to wall, The Jealousies, Line 764
 
VESTMENTS.........2
And after him his sacred vestments swept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 152
Sure I have heard those vestments sweeping o'er Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 53
 
VESTS.............1
By the blear-eyed nations in empurpled vests , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 11
 
VESTURE'S.........1
Whose else? In this who touch thy vesture's hem? To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
 
VEX...............1
That every other minute vex and please: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 4
 
VEX'D.............3
Came vex'd and pettish through her nostrils small. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 470
Vex'd like a morning eagle, lost and weary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 635
Of love, retired, vex'd and murmuring The Jealousies, Line 131
 
VEXES.............2
Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 3
The other vexes it." Then shouted I The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 202
 
VEXING............2
Vexing conceptions of some sudden change; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 236
For this my love: for vexing Mars had teaz'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 558
 
VEXT..............3
O ye who have your eyeballs vext and tir'd On the Sea, Line 9
You vext with bad revolt? Was't opium, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 34
Something has vext you, Albert. There are times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 122
 
VIBRATES..........1
And each vibrates the string Ode to Apollo, Line 27
 
VIBRATING.........1
Leave the dinn'd air vibrating silverly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 128
 
VICE..............3
Vice - that is, by turns,- The Gothic looks solemn, Line 7
What vice in this or that year was the rage, The Jealousies, Line 94
To this new-fangled vice , which seems a burr The Jealousies, Line 107
 
VICEROY...........1
From the Viceroy of Zanguebar,- wise, slow The Jealousies, Line 184
 
VICES.............1
No wrinkles, where all vices nestle in Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
 
VICINITY..........1
The Castle of Friedburg, its vicinity , and the Hungarian Camp Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, SCENE
 
VICIOUS...........1
Against the vicious manners of the age, The Jealousies, Line 92
 
VICTIM............1
Untouch'd, a victim of your beauty bright- On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 6
 
VICTOR............1
I wonder not this stranger's victor -deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 52
 
VICTORIOUS........1
Though hemm'd around by thy victorious arms. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 197
 
VICTORY...........11
Yes, there must be a golden victory ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 126
Victory , might be lost, or might be won. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 342
His blood-stain'd ensigns to the victory Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
A victory ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 6a
I am the victory !" Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 62a
His crowded state after the victory . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 93
In tender victory ,- but for myself Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 139
Throw down those imps and give me victory . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 431
Points level to the goal of victory . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 23
Trumpets sounding a victory . Enter GLOCESTER, Knights, and King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
He shames our victory . His valour still King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 35
 
VIEING............2
Vieing with fish of brilliant dye below; Imitation of Spenser, Line 11
Into Elysium; vieing to rehearse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 372
 
VIEW..............13
Nor can remembrance, Mathew! bring to view To George Felton Mathew, Line 3
Whence Calidore might have the goodliest view Calidore: A Fragment, Line 25
The sidelong view of swelling leafiness, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 34
And view the glory of their festivals: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 36
Thy dales, and hills, are fading from my view : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 104
Of vine leaves. Then there rose to view a fane Sleep and Poetry, Line 363
And faint away, before my eager view : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 588
From the fast mouldering head there shut from view : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 430
His bright feet touch'd, and there he stay'd to view Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 368
So at the view of sad Moneta's brow, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 275
Holding it by his thumb and finger full in view . The Jealousies, Line 441
Good Hum, and let me view this mighty coil." The Jealousies, Line 565
For pleasure?)- the fair Princess in full view , The Jealousies, Line 592
 
VIEW'D............1
Could lift Endymion's head, or he had view'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 557
 
VIEWING...........1
A little brook. The youth had long been viewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 52
 
VIEWLESS..........2
But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 33
Mission'd her viewless servants to enrich Lamia, Part II, Line 136
 
VIGIL.............1
Its fiery vigil in her single breast; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 242
 
VIGILANT..........1
Seeing so many vigilant eyes explore Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 125
 
VIGILS............1
May seem a span; let me thy vigils keep O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 6
 
VIGOROUS..........1
Annull'd my vigorous cravings: and thus quell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 662
 
VIGOUR............2
O give me their old vigour , and unheard, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 9
Of all the toil and vigour you have spent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 45
 
VILE..............8
And compass vile : so that ye taught a school Sleep and Poetry, Line 196
The kernel of his hopes, how more than vile : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 146
The thing was vile with green and livid spot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 475
Do ye forget the blows, the buffets vile ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 317
And painful vile oblivion seals my eyes: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 87
Your person unaffronted by vile odds, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 25
Vile strictures on the conduct of a prince The Jealousies, Line 470
That vile imposter Hum,-" The Jealousies, Line 787a
 
VILELY............1
Such innocence to ruin, - who vilely cheats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 35
 
VILLAGE...........1
Their golden honeycombs; our village leas Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 254
 
VILLAGERS.........1
Gay villagers , upon a morn of May, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 83
 
VILLAIN...........2
Let not this slave - this villain - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 118b
Out, villain ! dastard! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 158a
 
VILLAINY..........3
Villainy ! Villainy! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 68b
Villainy! Villainy ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 68b
O I am tortur'd by this villainy . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 72
 
VILLANOUS.........1
Thrice villanous , stay there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 2b
 
VINE..............4
Of vine leaves. Then there rose to view a fane Sleep and Poetry, Line 363
The vine of glossy sprout; the ivy mesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 412
Before the vine -wreath crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 258
The open casement press'd a new-leaved vine , Ode on Indolence, Line 47
 
VINES.............4
Cover'd with crystal vines ; then weeping trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 615
And plunder'd vines , teeming exhaustless, pleach'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 927
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To Autumn, Line 4
Of trellis vines , and bells, and larger blooms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 26
 
VINEYARDED........1
Paled in and vineyarded from beggar-spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 132
 
VINTAGE...........6
But those of Saturn's vintage ; mouldering scrolls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 129
Like to a moving vintage down they came, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 200
I saw the whelming vintage hotly pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 261
O, for a draught of vintage ! that hath been Ode to a Nightingale, Line 11
Black stain'd with the fat vintage , as it were Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 124
But when the happy vintage touch'd their brains, Lamia, Part II, Line 203
 
VINTAGER..........1
Since Ariadne was a vintager , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 443
 
VIOL..............1
A viol , bow strings torn, cross-wise upon Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 40
 
VIOLATE...........3
Thus violate thy bower's sanctity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 106
Thus violate thy slumbrous solitude? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 69
Thus violate thy slumbrous solitude? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 369
 
VIOLENCE..........1
Forgot all violence , and but commun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 867
 
VIOLET............7
Light feet, dark violet eyes, and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
Would be to find where violet beds were nestling, To George Felton Mathew, Line 49
He of the rose, the violet , the spring, Addressed to the Same, Line 5
Of secrecy, the violet :- What strange powers Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 12
And the violet white For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 34
Blendeth its odour with the violet ,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 321
Violet young nature nurst, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 42
 
VIOLETS...........6
A bunch of violets full blown, and double, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 92
Moist, cool and green; and shade the violets , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 33
Roses, and pinks, and violets , to adorn To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 7
A scent of violets , and blossoming limes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 667
Rain'd violets upon his sleeping eyes. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 427
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
 
VIOLS.............1
Of flutes and viols , ravishing his heart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 772
 
VIPERS............1
The names of those two vipers , from whose jaws Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 153
 
VIRGIN............9
From a virgin chorus flows Ode to Apollo, Line 32
Of virgin bloom paled gently for slight fear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 189
Among the stars in virgin splendour pours; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 580
A virgin light to the deep; my grotto-sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 113
Nor virgin -choir to make delicious moan Ode to Psyche, Line 30
Strength to thy virgin crownet's golden buds, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28
Young man, you heard this virgin say 'twas false,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
The slanderers of this virgin . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 164a
A virgin purest lipp'd, yet in the lore Lamia, Part I, Line 189
 
VIRGIN'S..........2
And virgin's bower, trailing airily; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 417
Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his prayer he saith. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 9
 
VIRGINS...........1
Young virgins might have visions of delight, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 47
 
VIRTUES...........1
In lovely modesty, and virtues rare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 22
 
VIRULENT..........1
Wither'd at dew so sweet and virulent ; Lamia, Part I, Line 149

Published @ RC

March 2005