Wav-We - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
WAVE..............14
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 6
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 24
And wave thy silver pinions o'er my head! To Hope, Line 30
Thou biddest Shakspeare wave his hand, Ode to Apollo, Line 24
Thou dipp'st them in the taintless wave ; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 32
To see high, golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
Its airy swellings, with a gentle wave , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 118
Old ocean rolls a lengthened wave to the shore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 348
To muse for ever - Then a lucid wave , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 997
As if the ebbing air had but one wave ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 78
And a wave fill'd it, as my sense was fill'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 279
Or on the rainbow of the salt sand- wave , Ode on Melancholy, Line 16
As if the ebbing air had but one wave ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 377
The other he could wave about at will; The Jealousies, Line 607
 
WAVED.............2
She waved her handkerchief. "Ah, very grand!" The Jealousies, Line 596
Legions of holiday; bright standards waved , The Jealousies, Line 733
 
WAVES.............18
Cast upward, through the waves , a ruby glow: Imitation of Spenser, Line 13
Beneath the waves like Afric's ebony, Imitation of Spenser, Line 17
As e'er from Lethe's waves was quaft, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 8
Which the emerald waves at your feet gladly threw. To Some Ladies, Line 24
And sports with half his tail above the waves . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 52
Above the ocean- waves . The stalks, and blades, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 125
Its gathering waves - ye felt it not. The blue Sleep and Poetry, Line 189
Echoing grottos, full of tumbling waves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 459
Dancing upon the waves , as if to please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 84
Thee the waves awful bow. Fast, stubborn rock, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 946
Over the pathless waves towards him bows. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 96
Sav'd from the shores of darkness, when the waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 135
The ponderous syllables, like sullen waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 305
Dost thou forget, sham Monarch of the Waves , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 319
Unhaunted by the murmurous noise of waves , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 40
Down through tress-lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
Or nature's rocks toil'd hard in waves and winds, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 69
To grow pale from the waves at dull midnight. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 458
 
WAVINESS..........2
With a glossy waviness ; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 20
Or the coy moon, when in the waviness To My Brother George (epistle), Line 59
 
WAVING............5
Waving thy silver pinions o'er my head. To Hope, Line 48
So that the waving of his plumes would be Calidore: A Fragment, Line 113
We see the waving of the mountain pine; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 128
A sovereign quell is in his waving hands; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 537
With convuls'd clenches waving it abroad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 231
 
WAVY..............5
Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 7
Or, on the wavy grass outstretch'd supinely, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 7
Pink robes, and wavy hair, and diamond jar, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 7
Than to sing out and sooth their wavy hair. Sleep and Poetry, Line 180
Staying their wavy bodies 'gainst the streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 73
 
WAX...............1
When that same treacherous wax began to run, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 443
 
WAXING............2
She saw it waxing very pale and dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 53
And the moon is waxing warm 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 8
 
WAY...............56
Mid- way between our homes:- your accents bland To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 122
A fragile dew-drop on its perilous way Sleep and Poetry, Line 86
Which way the tender-legged linnet hops. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 8
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Leading the way , young damsels danced along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 135
A lively prelude, fashioning the way Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 492
Watching the zenith, where the milky way Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 579
Sorrow the way to death; but patiently Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 973
It seem'd he flew, the way so easy was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 69
Abrupt, in middle air, his way was lost; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 656
Thou pointest out the way , and straight 'tis won. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 96
Along his fated way . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 119a
Thou shalt not go the way of aged men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 596
Met palsy half way : soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
Made a delighted way . Then dance, and song, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 933
To that fair shadow'd passion puls'd its way - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 446
He doth his green way beguile Robin Hood, Line 28
Making the best of 's way towards Soho. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 12
Before they fix'd upon a surest way Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 171
Spirits of grief, sing not your "Well-a- way !" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 485
For that I met upon the way Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 7
And have her holy way ? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 48
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way . There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Clear, but for golden fishes in the way , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 29
Wren or eagle, finds his way to Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 9
Teach us, here, the way to find you, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 26
Another way he went, and soon among The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 25
He follow'd through a lowly arched way , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 109
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
A certain shape or shadow, making way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 122
Found way unto Olympus, and made quake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 146
He follow'd, and she turn'd to lead the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 155
Making slow way , with head and neck convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 262
Found way from forth the thunders round his head! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 325
And stars by thousands! Point me out the way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 99
Arched every way aloof; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 18
In haste it seems. Now shall I be in the way , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 121
Sister, this way ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 142b
Off! And none pass this way on pain of death! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 72
Good gods! not else, in any way , my liege! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
Which way went they, boy? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 132b
Miss'd the way , boy? Say not that on your peril! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 16
This way - hark! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 31a
He would return that way , as well she knew, Lamia, Part I, Line 221
The way was short, for Lamia's eagerness Lamia, Part I, Line 344
My eyes to fathom the space every way ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 82
This way he comes, and if you would maintain King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 24
And which way spur for life? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 26b
For giving way , so over fashionably, The Jealousies, Line 106
He's always in my way upon the mat!" The Jealousies, Line 312
Nice way would be to bring her in a swoon; The Jealousies, Line 492
Say you are very sick, and bar the way The Jealousies, Line 535
"From two to half-past, dusky way we made, The Jealousies, Line 658
"About this time,- making delightful way ,- The Jealousies, Line 712
And, as we shaped our course, this, that way run, The Jealousies, Line 723
"Jostling my way I gain'd the stairs, and ran The Jealousies, Line 784
 
WAYFARING.........1
My soul; that I may dare, in wayfaring , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 133
 
WAYS..............8
But bending in a thousand graceful ways ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 4
Yes, thousands in a thousand different ways Sleep and Poetry, Line 148
Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkened ways Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 10
Tossing about on Neptune's restless ways , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 348
Has he been wandering in uncertain ways : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 48
Dares to pass our sacred ways , Not Aladdin magian, Line 36
Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways . Ode to a Nightingale, Line 40
Through the dark ways they chose to the open air; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 125
 
WAYSIDE...........1
By the wayside to linger, we shall see; Lamia, Part I, Line 201
 
WAYWARD...........5
With wayward melancholy; and I thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 688
Bursts gradual, with a wayward indolence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 350
This wayward brother to his rightful joys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 842
Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 1
A potent tutoress to my wayward boy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 32
 
WAYWORN...........2
Art thou wayworn , or canst not further trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 651
Call ardently! He was indeed wayworn ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 655
 
WE'LL.............7
A lovely tale of human life we'll read. Sleep and Poetry, Line 110
Rise, Cupids! or we'll give the blue-bell pinch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 505
We'll talk about - no more of dreaming.- Now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 669
Of a poor three hours' absence? but we'll gain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 205
We'll make it so. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 129a
We'll meet upon our subject. Farewell, Count! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 63
We'll have her presently; aye, you shall see her, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 59
 
WE'RE.............1
We're safe enough; here in this arm-chair sit, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
 
WE'VE.............1
These things are doubtless: yet in truth we've had Sleep and Poetry, Line 230
 
WEAK..............21
My spirit is too weak - mortality On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 1
O kindly muse! let not my weak tongue faulter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 128
Ah, gentle! 'tis as weak as spider's skein; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 757
For one so weak to venture his poor verse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 938
He passeth by; and his weak spirit fails The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 17
Save one old beldame, weak in body and in soul. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
When my weak voice shall whisper its last prayer, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 147
A poor, weak , palsy-stricken, churchyard thing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 155
So weak a creature could turn off the help Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 257
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 4
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
Is now your infant;- I am a weak child. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 120
Their weak rebellion, winning me with lies, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 74
And shrink away from a weak woman's eye? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 247
Your wrath, weak boy? Tremble at mine, unless Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Of the weak body and soul? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 3a
As her weak hand could any meaning tell, Lamia, Part II, Line 302
Rejoin'd that voice - "They are no dreamers weak , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 162
But my own weak mortality, I bore The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 389
Weak as the reed - weak - feeble as my voice- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 428
Weak as the reed - weak - feeble as my voice- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 428
 
WEAKNESS..........3
On this poor weakness ! but, for all her strife, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 718
Of fear and weakness , and a hollow state. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 178
Over her woman's weakness . ' Where,' cried I, The Jealousies, Line 780
 
WEAL..............2
Loving and hatred, misery and weal , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 112
Whatever he shall wish, betide her weal or woe. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 162
 
WEALTH............5
Had dipt his rod in it: such garland wealth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 563
All the heaped autumn's wealth , Fancy, Line 35
Or on the wealth of globed peonies; Ode on Melancholy, Line 17
Whence all this mighty cost and blaze of wealth could spring. Lamia, Part II, Line 198
Their shutters with a moody sense of wealth , The Jealousies, Line 209
 
WEALTHY...........3
What though I am not wealthy in the dower Sleep and Poetry, Line 284
Flared, here and there, from wealthy festivals, Lamia, Part I, Line 358
Of wealthy lustre was the banquet-room, Lamia, Part II, Line 173
 
WEAN..............3
Verses from which the soul would never wean : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 108
Starts at the sight of Laura; nor can wean Sleep and Poetry, Line 390
A very nothing would have power to wean Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 462
 
WEANING...........1
Amid her window-flowers,- sighing,- weaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 28
 
WEAPON............1
What weapon has the lion but himself? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 21
 
WEAR..............3
But far from such companionship to wear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 291
You would not wear a crown, or rule a kingdom, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 77
Am I an Emperor? Do I wear a crown? The Jealousies, Line 143
 
WEAR'ST...........1
And wear'st thou the shield of the fam'd Britomartis? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 12
 
WEARIED...........3
Perhaps grown wearied of their Corinth talk: Lamia, Part I, Line 232
"I'm wearied ," said fair Lamia: "tell me who Lamia, Part I, Line 371
Alas! my wearied heart within me sinks, The Jealousies, Line 165
 
WEARILY...........1
So wearily , as if night's chariot-wheels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
 
WEARINESS.........5
Time's sweet first-fruits - they danc'd to weariness , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
As palmer's that with weariness mid-desert shrine hath found. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
The weariness , the fever, and the fret Ode to a Nightingale, Line 23
Once he complain'd of weariness . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 48a
This should cheer up your Highness; the weariness Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 57
 
WEARS.............2
And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 11
To-night, if I may guess, thy beauty wears To Fanny, Line 11
 
WEARY.............20
And when thou art weary , I'll find thee a bed, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 9
Nigh swooning, he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
Had I been used to pass my weary eves; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 546
Of weary life." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 710a
Of weary days, made deeper exquisite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 911
Till, weary , he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
Vex'd like a morning eagle, lost and weary , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 635
His weary limbs, bathing an hour's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 836
Stay, stay thy weary course, and let me lead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 950
Sleep will come smoothly to my weary brow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 236
My weary watching. Though thou know'st it not, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 297
Sick hearted, weary - so I took a whim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 269
With the slow move of time,- sluggish and weary Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 922
And for them many a weary hand did swelt Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 107
When weary feet forget themselves upon a pleasant turf, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 9
Doth not weary ? Where's the face Fancy, Line 73
And press it so upon our weary griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 66
Tired out, and weary -worn with contumelies. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 116
We are all weary - faint - set ope the doors- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 194
From weary tendrils, and bow'd branches green, Lamia, Part I, Line 98
 
WEATHER...........9
The evening weather was so bright, and clear, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 215
To keep off mildews, and all weather harms: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 284
Vesper, the beauty-crest of summer weather ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 363
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 5
When the weather There was a naughty boy, Line 47
When the weather There was a naughty boy, Line 51
Through blustring weather , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 38
All delights of summer weather ; Fancy, Line 32
"'Twas twelve o'clock at night, the weather fine, The Jealousies, Line 642
 
WEAVE.............5
And weave them dyingly - send honey-whispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 955
Me, dear Endymion, were I to weave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 749
The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 90
Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 1
Of fragrant curtain'd Love begins to weave The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 11
 
WEAVING...........3
Weaving a coronal of tender scions Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 693
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving : I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 4
When they St. Agnes' wool are weaving piously." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 117
 
WEB...............3
Web -footed alligators, crocodiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 245
Since I was tangled in thy beauty's web , Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 3
With half unravel'd web . I set myself The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 308
 
WED...............6
To things ye knew not of,- were closely wed Sleep and Poetry, Line 194
I'll smile no more, Peona; nor will wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 972
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
Shook with eternal palsy, I did wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 957
If Isabel's quick eye had not been wed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 51
The while: Ah! thou must needs the lady wed , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 179
 
WEDDED............2
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground- There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
For the sake of my fair newly wedded wife, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 142
 
WEDDING...........7
From Cynthia's wedding and festivity? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 566
When he shall hear the wedding lutes a playing.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 601
When wedding fiddles are a playing, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 1
Fra happy wedding , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 42
To talk of horrors on our wedding -night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
her, to whose wedding , amongst other guests, came Apollonius; who, by some Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Against the Emperor's wedding ;- and, sir, this The Jealousies, Line 284
 
WEED..............13
It was some glorious form, some splendid weed , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 119
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed . On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 8
Easily onward, thorough flowers and weed . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 62
So plenteously all weed -hidden roots Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 65
Seeing thou art so gentle. Could I weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 106
Were her fair limbs, and like a common weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 624
Lethe's weed , and Hermes' feather, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 2
Upon a lampit rock of green sea weed Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 88
Poor Girl! put on thy stifling widow's weed , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 229
Half-hidden, like a mermaid in sea- weed , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 231
I to green- weed rivers bright! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 4
With forest branches and the trodden weed ; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 43
The taller grasses and full-flowering weed , Lamia, Part I, Line 44
 
WEEDED............2
Upon a weeded rock this old man sat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 193
O lank-eared Phantoms of black- weeded pools! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 230
 
WEEDS.............9
E'er grew in Paphos, from the bitter weeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 249
The patient weeds , that now unshent by foam Sleep and Poetry, Line 379
Hung a lush screen of drooping weeds , and spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 940
Whether to weeds or flowers; but for me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 160
His head upon a tuft of straggling weeds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 109
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
Should be more common than the growth of weeds . And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 14
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
Bring me some mourning weeds , that I may 'tire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 93
 
WEEDY.............2
Blue tides may sluice and drench their time in caves and weedy There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 18
Unown'd of any weedy -haired gods; What can I do to drive away, Line 36
 
WEEK..............3
O that a week could be an age, and we To J.R., Line 1
Felt parting and warm meeting every week ; To J.R., Line 2
To mortals, of their little week ; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 30
 
WEEKS.............3
Some weeks have pass'd since last I saw the spires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 84
And kept his weeks of Ember- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 9
As one I knew some passed weeks ago, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 41
 
WEEN..............1
Better than Wordsworth too, I ween , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 31
 
WEEP..............34
Lo! how they murmur, laugh, and smile, and weep : Sleep and Poetry, Line 142
And weep ? Or did ye wholly bid adieu Sleep and Poetry, Line 215
Poor nymph,- poor Pan,- how he did weep to find I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 159
Yet 'tis a gentle luxury to weep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 6
Still so pale? - then, dearest, weep ; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 9
Weep ! I'll count the tears: Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 10
Aye, sleep; for when our love-sick queen did weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 481
Into the breezy clouds, to weep and pray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 557
These lovers did embrace, and we must weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 730
Thee thus, and weep for fondness - I am pain'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 822
For great enfranchisement. O weep no more; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 299
One hair of thine: see how I weep and sigh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 583
"Young lover, I must weep - such hellish spite Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 615
Dost weep for me? Then should I be content. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 119
Yet did she merely weep - her gentle soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 470
Endymion, weep not so! Why shouldst thou pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 805
She would weep , and he would craze: Robin Hood, Line 42
She would weep that her wild bees Robin Hood, Line 46
But to each other dream, and nightly weep . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 8
O Muses, weep the rest- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 68b
At which fair Madeline began to weep , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 302
Saturn, sleep on! while at thy feet I weep ." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 71
Of what I heard, and how it made me weep , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 260
That thou shouldst weep , so gifted? Tell me, youth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 68
Weep no more - O weep no more! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 3
Weep no more - O weep no more! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 3
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
And hopeful featur'd. Ha! by heaven you weep ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 85
But weep , and weep, that they were born so fair? Lamia, Part I, Line 62
But weep, and weep , that they were born so fair? Lamia, Part I, Line 62
Aye, and could weep for love of such award." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 185
Saturn, sleep on, while at thy feet I weep ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 371
"Ah! good my Prince, weep not!" And then again The Jealousies, Line 424
He fill'd a bumper. "Great sire, do not weep ! The Jealousies, Line 425
 
WEEPING...........16
Wreather of poppy buds, and weeping willows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 14
Cover'd with crystal vines; then weeping trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 615
Death fell a weeping in his charnel-house. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 788
I sat a weeping : in the whole world wide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 183
I sat a weeping : what enamour'd bride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 189
Sad Zephyr droops the clouds like weeping willow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 369
One hour doth linger weeping , for the pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 518
Beside her basil, weeping through her hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 472
That now in vain are weeping their last tears, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 16
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 88
Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud, Ode on Melancholy, Line 12
Break through her weeping servants, till thou com'st Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
The lady weeping , the old abbot cowl'd. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 12
And tassell'd round with weeping meteors! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 39
And the sad Goddess weeping at his feet; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 387
Their point, and bring the weeping bride away; The Jealousies, Line 33
 
WEEPS.............4
Of grasshoppers against the sun. She weeps , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 715
His tears, who weeps for thee. Where dost thou sigh? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 77
She weeps alone for pleasures not to be; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 233
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air. Lamia, Part I, Line 63
 
WEET..............1
He was to weet a melancholy carle, Character of C.B., Line 1
 
WEIGH.............3
Weigh down thy nature. Hast thou sinn'd in aught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 508
Let us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 7
Painful, clogg'd up and stagnate. Weigh this matter Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 186
 
WEIGHS............3
Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep, On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 2
And a large flint-stone weighs upon my feet; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 299
Not in your heart while care weighs on your brow: Lamia, Part II, Line 43
 
WEIGHT............7
And dipt again, with the young couple's weight ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 426
I caught a finger: but the downward weight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 673
His tongue with the full weight of utterless thought, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 120
Bearing with me a weight of benefits Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 138
With pleasant weight , the amorous-aching earth, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
I' the morning, freighted with a weight of woe, The Jealousies, Line 239
Though it's a pretty weight , it will not tire, The Jealousies, Line 516
 
WEIGHTY...........3
Was as weighty There was a naughty boy, Line 106
Fools! make me whole again that weighty pearl And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 15
Maturing to a weighty diadem! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 31
 
WEIRD.............1
Her hair in weird syrops, that would keep Lamia, Part I, Line 107
 
WELCH.............1
He flies, for the Welch beagles to hunt down. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 18
 
WELCOME...........9
Welcome the float of Thetis. Long he dwells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 611
Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 1
Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 1
The flush of welcome ever on the cheek. To J.R., Line 4
The unworthy welcome of your servant's house? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 78
No welcome to a princely visitor, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 94
Welcome task! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 116b
We will make trial of your house's welcome , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 183
Welcome , thou young scepter to the realm! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
 
WELCOMING.........3
Or did ye stay to give a welcoming Sleep and Poetry, Line 217
Her lips with music for the welcoming . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 377
Warm the nerve of a welcoming hand, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 5
 
WELLINGTONS.......1
And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 8
 
WELLS.............3
But when, O Wells ! thy roses came to me To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 11
Faint fare-thee- wells , and sigh-shrilled adieus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 690
And pebbles blue from deep enchanted wells . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 696
 
WEN...............1
upon her, sure as a wen . We are safe. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 61
 
WENCHES...........1
Of cinder wenches meet and soil each other; The Jealousies, Line 771
 
WENT..............78
Went off in gentle windings to the hoar Calidore: A Fragment, Line 27
Over a knightly brow; while they went by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 131
Journey it went . Sleep and Poetry, Line 162a
And did not know it,- no, they went about, Sleep and Poetry, Line 203
So felt he, who first told, how Psyche went I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 141
The incense went to her own starry dwelling. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 198
Went drowsily under, God of the golden bow, Line 18
Before he went to live with owls and bats, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 1
Old Jonah went to C. O grant that like to Peter I, Line 4
Where no man went ; and if from shepherd's keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 68
Over the hills at every nightfall went . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 72
Went , spiritual, through the damsel's hand; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 498
Through clear and cloudy, even when she went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 596
Went swift beneath the merry-winged guide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
With deep-drawn sighs was quieting, he went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 255
Went noiseless as a passing noontide rain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 380
So saw he panting light, and towards it went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 383
He forthright pass'd, and lightly treading went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 431
But my poor mistress went distract and mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 473
Up went the hum celestial. High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Swifter than lightning went these wonders rare; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 621
Thou seem'dst my sister: hand in hand we went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 145
If it went not to solemnize thy reign. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 159
Went arching up, and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
Went forward with the Carian side by side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 311
This fierce temptation went : and thou may'st not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 451
From their poor breasts went sueing to her ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 519
Went through the dismal air like one huge Python Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 530
With dancing and loud revelry,- and went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 535
They went till unobscur'd the porches shone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 724
And onward went upon his high employ, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 783
Thus went that beautiful multitude, nor far, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 818
Before he went into his quiet cave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 996
His fingers went across it - All were mute Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1003
"Over wide streams and mountains great we went , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Even these words went echoing dismally Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 322
While past the vision went in bright array. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 562
His first touch of the earth went nigh to kill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 614
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went : henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
Into the vallies green together went . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 765
His eyes went after them, until they got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 905
They vanish'd far away!- Peona went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1002
And a kiss from the stranger as off he went Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 15
He with light steps went up a western hill, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
And went all naked to the hungry shark; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 114
And went in haste, to get in readiness, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 191
And as he went she chanted merrily. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 208
And went into that dismal forest-hearse. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 344
Never to turn again.- Away they went , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 479
They went togither. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 24
Sigh'd; rueful again the piteous bag-pipe went ; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
And went to sleep again. Soon she was rous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 71
Were not so tongue-tied,- no, they went O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 8
Another way he went , and soon among The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 25
Out went the taper as she hurried in; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 199
And off he went , run, trot, or any how. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 96
A stream went voiceless by, still deadened more Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 11
Along the margin-sand large foot-marks went , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
So came these words and went ; the while in tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 79
Thus brief; then with beseeching eyes she went Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 153
Went step for step with Thea through the woods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 202
Went trickling down the golden bow he held. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
Who seem'd to me, as rugged times then went , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
A deadly breath went forth to taint and blast Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 154
Still very sick, my lord; but now I went , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 1
Which way went they, boy? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 132b
How, ever, where she will'd, her spirit went ; Lamia, Part I, Line 205
Silently paced about, and as she went , Lamia, Part II, Line 134
Soft went the music the soft air along, Lamia, Part II, Line 199
Like a sharp spear, went through her utterly, Lamia, Part II, Line 300
Towards the altar sober-pac'd I went , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 93
A stream went voiceless by, still deaden'd more The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 315
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
So came these words, and went ; the while in tears The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 378
Eban then paid his fare, and tiptoe went The Jealousies, Line 262
Doubled into a common fist, went grand, The Jealousies, Line 350
That, being fuddled, he went reeling through The Jealousies, Line 624
It went for apoplexy - foolish folks!- The Jealousies, Line 695
 
WEPT..............25
The Poet wept at her so piteous fate, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 201
Wept that such beauty should be desolate: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 202
Of that dark gulph he wept , and said: "I urge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1013
With pity, for the grey-hair'd creature wept . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 283
Press'd its cold hand, and wept ,- and Scylla sigh'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 780
There was no one to ask me why I wept ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 184
At this the shadow wept , melting away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 456
Whether they wept , or laugh'd, or griev'd, or toy'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 494
Has wept for thee, calling to Jove aloud. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 607
And yet the tears she wept were tears of sorrow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 725
Sorely she wept until the night came on, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 234
Lorenzo stood, and wept : the forest tomb Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 275
Sighing all day - and still she kiss'd, and wept . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 408
They all three wept - but counsel was as vain When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 65
Some wept , some wail'd, all bow'd with reverence; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 112
He listen'd, and he wept , and his bright tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 42
And there she wept , and sigh'd full sore, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 30
When I have wept for sorrow; but methinks Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 88
But wept alone those days, for why should she adore? Lamia, Part I, Line 321
Arose and knelt before him, wept a rain Lamia, Part II, Line 66
wept , and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved, and Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
And all the priesthood of his city wept , The Jealousies, Line 11
They wept , he sinn'd, and still he would sin on, The Jealousies, Line 15
And wept upon its purple palatine, The Jealousies, Line 411
And wept as if he never would have done, The Jealousies, Line 445
 
WERT..............6
But thou to please wert nurtured so completely To G.A.W., Line 11
Of little eyes, as though thou wert to shed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 630
An urn of tears, as though thou wert cold dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 432
Mourn'd as if yet thou wert a forester;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 779
And it will breed a wert . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 44
Wert thou not mine. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 14a
 
WERTER............1
No, no, there Mr. Werter takes his spoon, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 10
 
WEST..............23
And the west is resplendently cloathed in beams. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 4
Are closing in the west ; or that soft humming Calidore: A Fragment, Line 160
When streams of light pour down the golden west , Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 2
The purple west , and, two bright streaks between, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 11
Now I direct my eyes into the west , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 139
The cloudy rack slow journeying in the west ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 288
Or than the west , made jealous by the smiles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 361
When thy gold breath is misting in the west , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 44
From natural west , and east, and south, and north, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 876
Bows down his summer head below the west . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
And of the east and west ! God of the meridian, Line 2
How could these money-bags see east and west ?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 142
And the sick west continually bereaves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 251
And so, when harbour'd in the sleepy west , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 190
Came slope upon the threshold of the west ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 204
Each day from east to west the heavens through, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 270
To my home, far, far in west , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 45
Far in the west where the May-cloud lowers, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 97
Then to the west I look'd, and saw far off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 87
Wherefore when harbour'd in the sleepy west , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 34
Is sloping to the threshold of the west . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 48
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west . The Jealousies, Line 243
Far in the west a mighty fire broke out- The Jealousies, Line 677
 
WESTERN...........12
In thy western halls of gold Ode to Apollo, Line 1
And even the western splendour warms Ode to Apollo, Line 9
Round many western islands have I been On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 3
Around the western border of the wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 542
Not oat-sheaves drooping in the western sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 610
Pictur'd in western cloudiness, that takes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 741
Have seen a new tinge in the western skies: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 727
A new appareling for western skies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 464
He with light steps went up a western hill, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 79
O' the western wild, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 50
O' the western wild, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 55
And on the western window panes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 6
 
WESTWARD..........3
Why westward turn? 'Twas but to say adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 141
As from the westward of a summer's night; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 52
South- westward to Cleone. There she stood Lamia, Part I, Line 179
 
WET...............6
Whose silent wheels, fresh wet from clouds of morn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 519
And of those numbers every eye was wet ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 823
And the clothes left in the wet , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 7
Sweet basil, which her tears kept ever wet . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 416
The brethren's skulls mourn, dewy wet , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 5
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13
 
WETTED............1
Sorely she grieved, and wetted three or four The Jealousies, Line 82

Published @ RC

March 2005