Wh-Win - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
WHALE.............3
The gulphing whale was like a dot in the spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 205
And mount upon the snortings of a whale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 246
Of northern whale ; then for the tender prize- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 64
 
WHALES............2
In which whales harbour close, to brood and sulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 882
First with the whales , last with the eagle skies; To Ailsa Rock, Line 12
 
WHANNE............1
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
 
WHAT'S............2
I must see Ludolph or the - What's that shout? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 82
To examine his scrutoire, and see what's in it, The Jealousies, Line 620
 
WHATE.............1
And chieflie whate he auctorethe The Eve of St. Mark, Line 113
 
WHATE'ER..........3
After that, say and do whate'er you please. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 111
Let the mad poets say whate'er they please Lamia, Part I, Line 328
Whate'er your palmistry may make of it, The Jealousies, Line 331
 
WHATEVER..........2
Whatever he shall wish, betide her weal or woe. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 162
Possess whatever bliss thou canst devise, Lamia, Part I, Line 85
 
WHEEL.............5
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies, Sleep and Poetry, Line 131
Half-ignorant, they turn'd an easy wheel , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 119
Or with a finger stay'd Ixion's wheel . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 30
Confess, or by the wheel - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 160b
And bade the coachman wheel to such a street, The Jealousies, Line 254
 
WHEELED...........1
Beyond the nimble- wheeled quest Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 46
 
WHEELING..........1
A griffin, wheeling here and there about, The Jealousies, Line 680
 
WHEELS............6
Phoebus awhile delayed his mighty wheels , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 212
How tremulous-dazzlingly the wheels sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 189
Whose silent wheels , fresh wet from clouds of morn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 519
The sluggish wheels ; solemn their toothed maws, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 644
So wearily, as if night's chariot- wheels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
Wheels round its dazzling spokes."- The lady's cheek Lamia, Part II, Line 64
 
WHEEZY............1
For all the wheezy asthma - and for all To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 10
 
WHELMED...........1
Or side by side with whelmed mariners. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 123
 
WHELMING..........2
He turn'd - there was a whelming sound - he stept, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1018
I saw the whelming vintage hotly pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 261
 
WHELPING..........1
Replied the Swiss,- "the nasty, whelping brat!" The Jealousies, Line 314
 
WHENCE............37
Whence genius wildly flash'd, and high debate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 4
Yet over the steep, whence the mountain stream rushes, To Some Ladies, Line 5
Nature's observatory - whence the dell, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 4
Whence gush the streams of song: in happy hour To George Felton Mathew, Line 78
Turn to whence they sprung before. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 16
Whence Calidore might have the goodliest view Calidore: A Fragment, Line 25
Whence ever and anon the jay outsprings, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 36
Whence may be seen the castle gloomy, and grand: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 65
Is a full harvest whence to reap high feeling; To Kosciusko, Line 2
Whence I may copy many a lovely saying Sleep and Poetry, Line 65
That we must ever wonder how, and whence Sleep and Poetry, Line 70
Be moved for days from whence it sometime fell, On the Sea, Line 7
To a wide lawn, whence one could only see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 82
Whence , from a certain spot, its winding flood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 543
Whence that completed form of all completeness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 606
Whence came that high perfection of all sweetness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 607
Is friendship, whence there ever issues forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 804
Whence it ran brightly forth, and white did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 936
Towers like an ocean-cliff, and whence he seeth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 241
To search it inwards; whence far off appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
A naked waist: "Fair Cupid, whence is this?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 713
They knew not whence this bounty, and elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 370
And rigid ranks of iron - whence who dares Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 732
Whence could be seen, direct, a golden gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 855
" Whence came ye, merry Damsels! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 218
"Whence came ye, merry Damsels! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 218
" Whence came ye, jolly Satyrs! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 228
"Whence came ye, jolly Satyrs! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 228
I do, I do.- What is this soul then? Whence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 475
No tongue shall ask, whence come ye? but ye shall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 822
Good visions in the air,- whence will befal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 830
Whence thick, and green, and beautiful it grew, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 426
To make me desolate? whence came the strength? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 103
I, Coelus, wonder, how they came and whence ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 314
She did so, but 'tis doubtful how and whence Lamia, Part II, Line 117
Whence all this mighty cost and blaze of wealth could spring. Lamia, Part II, Line 198
Whence come you? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 28b
 
WHENE'ER..........4
Whene'er I wander, at the fall of night, To Hope, Line 7
Whene'er the fate of those I hold most dear To Hope, Line 19
Ah! surely it must be whene'er I find To George Felton Mathew, Line 36
Whene'er I venture on the stream of rhyme; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 16
 
WHERE'ER..........2
Where'er I look: but yet, I'll say 'tis naught- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 985
For very idleness? Where'er thou art, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 694
 
WHERE'S...........6
Where's the Poet? Show him! show him! Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 1
Where's the cheek that doth not fade, Fancy, Line 69
Too much gaz'd at? Where's the maid Fancy, Line 70
Where's the eye, however blue, Fancy, Line 72
Doth not weary? Where's the face Fancy, Line 73
Where's the voice, however soft, Fancy, Line 75
 
WHEREAT...........9
Whereat , methought, the lidless-eyed train Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 598
But she was gone. Whereat the barbed shafts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 480
Whereat was heard a noise of painful toil, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 522
Another multitude. Whereat more quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 821
Adieu!" Whereat those maidens, with wild stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 903
Whereat the star of Lethe not delay'd Lamia, Part I, Line 81
Pointing some whither: whereat he too rose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 456
Whereat , to calm their fears, he promised soon The Jealousies, Line 24
Whereat a narrow Flemish glass he took, The Jealousies, Line 415
 
WHEREFORE.........23
Wherefore does any grief our joy impair? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 14
Or wherefore comes that steed so proudly by? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 46
Wherefore more proudly does the gentle knight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 47
Then wherefore sully the entrusted gem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 757
But wherefore this? What care, though owl did fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 22
Wherefore delay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 649b
Such darling essence, wherefore may I not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 740
And wherefore so ashamed? 'Tis but to atone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 787
Grew strong within me: wherefore serve me so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 971
"Why was I not contented? Wherefore reach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 372
And all around - But wherefore this to thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 633
Ah! wherefore all this wormy circumstance? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 385
Say, wherefore did I laugh? O mortal pain! Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 6
"Saturn, look up!- though wherefore , poor old King? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 52
I cannot say, ' O wherefore sleepest thou?' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 54
I strive to search wherefore I am so sad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 88
A third time came they by;- alas! wherefore ? Ode on Indolence, Line 41
His features:- Lycius! wherefore did you blind Lamia, Part I, Line 373
O senseless Lycius! Madman! wherefore flout Lamia, Part II, Line 147
"Lamia, what means this? Wherefore dost thou start? Lamia, Part II, Line 254
I cannot cry, Wherefore thus sleepest thou? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 356
Wherefore when harbour'd in the sleepy west, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 34
Inclined to answer; wherefore instantly The Jealousies, Line 782
 
WHEREFROM.........1
Wherefrom I take strange lore, and read it deep, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
 
WHEREIN...........4
Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 777
With long-forgotten story, and wherein Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 127
A garden-pot, wherein she laid it by, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 414
By a clear pool, wherein she passioned Lamia, Part I, Line 182
 
WHEREOF...........1
The Adonian feast; whereof she saw no more, Lamia, Part I, Line 320
 
WHEREON...........5
Whereon , it was decreed he should be rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 477
Soon she turn'd up a soiled glove, whereon Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 369
The planet orb of fire, whereon he rode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 269
When he had lost his realms."- Whereon there grew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 302
Whereon were broider'd tigers with black eyes, The Jealousies, Line 447
 
WHERESOE'ER.......2
Glimmers thy crescent? Wheresoe'er it be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 309
A substance or a shadow, wheresoe'er Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 24
 
WHERESOEVER.......1
Wheresoever it may be; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 80
 
WHEREUPON.........1
When these words reach'd him. Whereupon he bows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 40
 
WHEREVER..........3
Strange journeyings! Wherever beauty dwells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 93
Wherever he may sport himself and play. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 172
Upon the mirror'd walls, wherever he might look. The Jealousies, Line 270
 
WHEREWITH.........4
Who stolen hast away the wings wherewith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 109
Wherewith disturb'd, she utter'd a soft moan: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 294
Wherewith the seasonable month endows Ode to a Nightingale, Line 44
Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 1
 
WHEREWITHAL.......1
To wander wherewithal and find its joys? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 223
 
WHETHER...........20
That I am oft in doubt whether at all To George Felton Mathew, Line 20
And whether there were tears of languishment, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 88
That, whether there be shine, or gloom o'ercast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 32
Whether descended from beneath the rocks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 198
That overtop your mountains; whether come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 199
For willing service; whether to surprise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 264
Has made me scruple whether that same night Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 860
Whether to weeds or flowers; but for me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 160
Whether to silver grots, or giant range Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 237
Whether they wept, or laugh'd, or griev'd, or toy'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 494
And the moon, whether prudish or complaisant, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 13
Whether through poz'd conviction, or disdain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 244
Whether the riddle puzzles her beyond Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 71
I know not whether to pity, curse, or laugh. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 206
Whether they merit death, or should be plac'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 243
Thou leadest me,- whether thy white feet press, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
Whether to faint Elysium, or where Lamia, Part I, Line 206
Whether my eyes can ever turn from thee! Lamia, Part I, Line 258
Whether the dream now purposed to rehearse The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 16
Whether his labours be sublime or low- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 173
 
WHETTING..........1
I saw a fury whetting a death-dart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 558
 
WHEW..............1
Of yonder hill, what crowds of people!" " Whew ! The Jealousies, Line 544
 
WHILES............4
Three rows of oars are lightening moment- whiles Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 57
Each one the face a moment whiles to me; Ode on Indolence, Line 22
I, for a moment- whiles , was prisoner ta'en Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
Besides, the foolish Prince sends, minute whiles , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
 
WHILST............5
Whilst I my thoughts to thee impart. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 8
Whilst they did sleep in love's elysium. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 823
Whilst I - Ah is it not a shame? Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 43
Whilst I in dudgeon sing. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 4
Yet listen, ye who will, whilst I bring proof Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 177
 
WHIM..............5
Their measure of content; what merest whim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 846
Sick hearted, weary - so I took a whim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 269
This hidden whim ; and long they watch'd in vain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 466
Full of this whim was thoughtful Madeline: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 55
Auranthe! I had hoped this whim had pass'd. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 117
 
WHIMPERING........2
Whimpering ideot! up! up! and quell! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 101
Whimpering away my reason! Hark 'e, sir,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
 
WHIMS.............1
And fitful whims of sleep are made of, streams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 749
 
WHINE.............1
Bow'd a fair greeting to these serpents' whine ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 190
 
WHINING...........2
That whining boyhood should with reverence bow Sleep and Poetry, Line 273
What whining bit of tongue and mouth thus dares Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 21
 
WHIP..............2
In blood from stinging whip ;- with hollow eyes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 110
"My darling Ape, I won't whip you to-day- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 63
 
WHIPSTOCK.........2
I made a whipstock of a faery's wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 26
You see: I made a whipstock of a wand; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 31
 
WHIRL.............3
Still downward with capacious whirl they glide; Sleep and Poetry, Line 133
It seem'd to whirl around me, and a swoon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 416
'Tis Bertha Pearl! What makes my brain so whirl ? The Jealousies, Line 383
 
WHIRLPOOL.........2
Quicksand and whirlpool , and deserted shore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 202
Into a whirlpool . Vanish into air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 53
 
WHIRLS............1
The palace whirls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1005b
 
WHIRLWIND.........2
For the whole herd, as by a whirlwind writhen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 529
Where in the gust, the whirlwind , and the flaw As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 10
 
WHISK.............1
As a bottle of whisk - I am as brisk, Line 2
 
WHISK'D...........1
She whisk'd against their eyes the sooty oil. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 521
 
WHISKEY...........1
(Here the lady took some more whiskey and was putting even more to Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
 
WHISKING..........1
To whisking tilburies, or phaetons rare, The Jealousies, Line 251
 
WHISP'RING........4
The songs of birds - the whisp'ring of the leaves- How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 10
Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 1
Many such eves of gently whisp'ring noise To My Brothers, Line 11
In deepest grass, beneath the whisp'ring roof Ode to Psyche, Line 10
 
WHISPER...........21
Not the minutest whisper does it send I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 66
That whisper round a temple become soon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 27
About the dewy forest, whisper tales?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 131
And whisper one sweet word that I may know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 319
Or the light whisper of her footstep soft; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 196
How she doth whisper to that aged Dame, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 346
With the whisper of heaven's trees Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 9
Whisper that the hour is near! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 9
He ventures in: let no buzz'd whisper tell: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 82
When my weak voice shall whisper its last prayer, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 147
Ere half this region- whisper had come down, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 349
Lift up their heads, as still the whisper pass'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 58
And not a foot or whisper to be heard. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 119
A whisper in this silence that he's dead! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 45
[They whisper . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 11
'Tis natural men should whisper ; at the kiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 28
To hear her whisper woman's lore so well; Lamia, Part I, Line 325
Warm breath, light whisper , tender semi-tone, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 3
To whisper , there's the man who took alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 31
"Dear Princess, do not whisper me so loud," The Jealousies, Line 46
He hears a whisper plainer than a rant: The Jealousies, Line 50
 
WHISPER'D.........11
Whisper'd of peace, and truth, and friendliness unquell'd. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 14
Smiling, thus whisper'd : "Though from upper day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 433
Whisper'd the guide, stuttering with joy, "even now." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 745
Whisper'd I and touch'd his brow. Not Aladdin magian, Line 20
Whisper'd I and strove to kiss Not Aladdin magian, Line 22
The dame return'd, and whisper'd in his ear The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 183
Thus whisper'd low and solemn in his ear. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 308
A jilt, whose ear was never whisper'd close, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 7
The ignominy of that whisper'd tale Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 140
And then she whisper'd in such trembling tone, Lamia, Part I, Line 301
"Why do you sigh, fair creature?" whisper'd he: Lamia, Part II, Line 40
 
WHISPERER.........1
What whisperer disturb'd his gloomy rest? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 97
 
WHISPERERS........2
Of whisperers in anger, or in sport; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 68
How many whisperers there are about, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 32
 
WHISPERING........15
A meaner sound than Raphael's whispering . Addressed to the Same, Line 8
And sometimes like a gentle whispering Sleep and Poetry, Line 29
And thy whispering melodies Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 15
Held her in peace: so that a whispering blade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 449
Rous'd by his whispering footsteps murmured faint: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 268
In a long whispering birth enchanted grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 346
They sound as through the whispering of trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 934
And calm, and whispering , and hideous roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 201
Of the forest's whispering fleeces, Robin Hood, Line 9
Unknown of any, free from whispering tale. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 86
Thus whispering , his warm, unnerved arm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 280
Stood in the passage whispering ; if any Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 3
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
What fearful whispering !- See, see,- Gersa there! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Lady, Line 13
Whispering in midnight silence, said the youth, Lamia, Part II, Line 84
 
WHISPERINGS.......3
While whisperings of affection Calidore: A Fragment, Line 84
It keeps eternal whisperings around On the Sea, Line 1
Foul, poisonous, malignant whisperings ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 130
 
WHISPERS..........9
Like whispers of the household gods that keep To My Brothers, Line 3
Eternal whispers , glooms, the birth, life, death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 234
The sudden silence, or the whispers low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 399
Who whispers him so pantingly and close? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 407
And weave them dyingly - send honey- whispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 955
And breathe thee whispers of its minstrelsy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 813
With whispers hush and shuffling feet, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 21
As I came in, some whispers ,- what of that? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 27
Of indoor pageantry; while syren whispers , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 53
 
WHIST.............2
And the beams of still Vesper, when winds are all whist , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 98
She wish'd a game at whist - made three revokes- The Jealousies, Line 700
 
WHISTLE...........1
With a sleety whistle through them, In drear nighted December, Line 6
 
WHISTLES..........1
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft; To Autumn, Line 32
 
WHIT..............1
Then there's that old Lord Maurice, not a whit The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 103
 
WHITE.............97
Through clouds of fleecy white , laughs the coerulean sky. Imitation of Spenser, Line 27
Soft dimpled hands, white neck, and creamy breast, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 16
God! she is like a milk- white lamb that bleats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 31
Or a white Naiad in a rippling stream; To George Felton Mathew, Line 23
With its own drooping buds, but very white ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 44
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
Broad leav'd are they and their white canopies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 22
Upholding wreaths of ivy; the white dove, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 43
Had found white coursers prancing in the glen: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 57
Nor minds he the white swans that dream so sweetly: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 62
In air he sees white coursers paw, and prance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 26
Crowned with flowers purple, white , and red: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 88
And rubbing of white hands, and sparkling eyes: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 96
And with proud breast his own white shadow crowning; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 2
And peers among the cloudlet's jet and white , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 94
Catch the white -handed nymphs in shady places, Sleep and Poetry, Line 105
Play with their fingers, touch their shoulders white Sleep and Poetry, Line 107
Lifted to the white clouds. Therefore should I Sleep and Poetry, Line 297
One, loveliest, holding her white hand toward Sleep and Poetry, Line 366
The clouds were pure and white as flocks new shorn, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 8
With wings of gentle flush o'er delicate white , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 58
Walking upon the white clouds wreath'd and curl'd. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 140
By thy white fingers, and thy spirit clear. To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 8
Oh! what a power has white simplicity! This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 9
Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white - On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 3
Before the daisies, vermeil rimm'd and white , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 50
From the white flock, but pass'd unworried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 75
Fair faces and a rush of garments white , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 124
Each having a white wicker over brimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 137
From his right hand there swung a vase, milk- white , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 153
Her pearl round ears, white neck, and orbed brow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
Made delicate from all white -flower bells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 669
Whence it ran brightly forth, and white did lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 936
Dost thou now lave thy feet and ankles white ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 325
On one white arm, and tenderly unclos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 404
Four lily stalks did their white honours wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 408
Soon were the white doves plain, with necks stretch'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 523
Of his white palace in wild forest nook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 890
Doff all sad fears, thou white deliciousness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1000
With lily shells, and pebbles milky white , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 103
And his white hair was awful, and a mat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 194
He woke as from a trance; his snow- white brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 221
Feeding from her white fingers, on the wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 278
I lov'd her to the very white of truth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 402
Such ranges of white feet, and patient lips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 739
Yet deign, white Queen of Beauty, thy fair eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 976
To the white rose bushes? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 150
His plump white arms, and shoulders, enough white Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 213
His plump white arms, and shoulders, enough white Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 213
Above the crystal circlings white and clear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 340
Let thy white shoulders silvery and bare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 587
In that same void white Chastity shall sit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 883
More soft, more white , and her fair cheek more fair; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 6
Asleep! O sleep a little while, white pearl, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 1
And the violet white For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 34
Gleams in the sun, the milk- white heifer lows, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 21
A white sail shews above the green-head cliff, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 23
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
She keeps so white and pert- All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 42
And his garments white did beat Not Aladdin magian, Line 14
The teeth complete, so white and small, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 56
White -plum'd lilies, and the first Fancy, Line 49
White as Hebe's, when her zone Fancy, Line 85
I kiss'd you oft, and gave you white pease; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 9
And couch supine their beauties, lily white ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 52
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
Thus answer'd, while his white melodious throat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 81
Beneath his white soft temples, stedfast kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 122
Blue, silver- white , and budded Tyrian, Ode to Psyche, Line 14
White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 46
In placid sandals, and in white robes graced: Ode on Indolence, Line 4
Young buds sleep in the root's white core. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 4
'Mong the blossoms white and red. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 10
So white as your soul is, if that but be Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
Thou leadest me,- whether thy white feet press, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
Beyond a flower pluck'd, white as itself? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
Deep blue eyes, semi-shaded in white lids, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 61
White temples, of exactest elegance, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 64
At whose white feet the languid Tritons poured Lamia, Part I, Line 15
Follow'd his steps, and her neck regal white Lamia, Part I, Line 243
Tiptoe with white arms spread. He, sick to lose Lamia, Part I, Line 287
Shuffled their sandals o'er the pavement white , Lamia, Part I, Line 356
In white robes, and themselves in order placed Lamia, Part II, Line 196
Lamia, no longer fair, there sat a deadly white . Lamia, Part II, Line 276
Where the white heifers low. And appetite The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 38
So white the linen; so, in some, distinct The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 76
From whose white fragrant curtains thus I heard The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 106
What tribe?"- The tall shade veil'd in drooping white The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 194
Trembled amid the white curls of his beard. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 451
And stretch'd her white arm through the hollow dark, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 455
That warm, white , lucent, million-pleasured breast,- I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 8
White Provence rose-leaves with her faery tears, The Jealousies, Line 83
And seeing his white teeth, he smiled the more; The Jealousies, Line 272
His turban wreath'd of gold, and white , and green, The Jealousies, Line 278
So that his frost- white eyebrows, beetling low, The Jealousies, Line 506
See, past the skirts of yon white cloud they go, The Jealousies, Line 553
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth. The Jealousies, Line 729
 
WHITELY...........1
More bluely vein'd, more soft, more whitely sweet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 625
 
WHITEN'D..........1
Whiten'd with ashes, and its lang'rous flame, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 238
 
WHITENESS.........2
That from a whiteness , as the lily clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 24
Faded the voice, warmth, whiteness , paradise, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 8
 
WHITER............2
Bring me a tablet whiter than a star, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 3
Wild thyme, and valley-lilies whiter still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 157
 
WHITEST...........3
Of whitest cassia, fresh from summer showers: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 96
Enough their whitest arms in silence clinging: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 11
Of whitest clouds she does her beauty dress, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 60
 
WHITHER...........19
Whither his brethren, bleating with content, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 71
' Ah! impious mortal, whither do I roam?' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 942
Said I, low voic'd: ' Ah, whither ! 'Tis the grot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 943
Are those swift moments? Whither are they fled? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 971
Because he knew not whither he was going. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 551
Join this bright throng, and nimble follow whither Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 604
Whither didst melt? Ah, what of that!- all good Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 668
That thou mayst always know whither I roam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 687
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went: henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
Nobody knew whither , till Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 15
(advancing from the back of the stage, whither he had Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
Whither ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 47a
Whither , whither is he winding? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 128a
Whither, whither is he winding? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 128a
I have you! Whither wander those fair eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
Whither fled Lamia, now a lady bright, Lamia, Part I, Line 171
Fresh anchor'd; whither he had been awhile Lamia, Part I, Line 226
Pointing some whither : whereat he too rose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 456
Whither I bent her force, What can I do to drive away, Line 13
 
WHIZZING..........1
Beside the feathery whizzing of the shaft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 333
 
WHO'S.............2
I will! Who hinders me? Who's Emperor? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 16
She was the cheater! Who's the cheater now, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 105
 
WHOEVER...........1
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find To Autumn, Line 13
 
WHOLE.............32
And through whole solemn hours dost sit, and hearken Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 238
A shout from the whole multitude arose, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 308
And a whole age of lingering moments crept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 915
Ourselves whole summers by a river glade; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 811
Keeping in wait whole days for Neptune's voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 355
Whole days and days in sheer astonishment; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 385
For the whole herd, as by a whirlwind writhen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 529
I sat a weeping: in the whole world wide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 183
Hath no revenge in it: as it is whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 471
In tenderness, would I were whole in love! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 472
Pregnant with such a den to save the whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 544
Not even I, for one whole month, will pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 824
Across the gold autumn's whole kingdoms of corn? Apollo to the Graces, Line 6
My wine overbrims a whole summer; Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 6
A whole long month of May in this sad plight Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 25
Yawning and doating a whole summer long, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 6
Fools! make me whole again that weighty pearl And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 15
They are all here to-night, the whole blood-thirsty race! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 99
But one of the whole mammoth-brood still kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 164
The whole enormous matter into life. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 197
That rebel Jove's whole armoury were spent, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 312
Unwearied ear of the whole universe Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 65
Amid the wreck of thousands I am whole ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
When the whole kingdom, centred in ourself, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 65
As though my hopes of favour had been whole . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 75
The whole world chaff to me. Your doom is fixed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
Still whole . I have surviv'd. My arm is strong,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 134
It seem'd he had lov'd them a whole summer long: Lamia, Part I, Line 250
Throughout, as fearful the whole charm might fade. Lamia, Part II, Line 124
Ponderous upon my senses a whole moon. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 392
But one of our whole eagle-brood still keeps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 13
O, let me have thee whole ,- all,- all - be mine! I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 5
 
WHOLENESS.........1
Whose rug is straw, whose wholeness is a crack; The Jealousies, Line 230
 
WHOLESALE.........1
It was the time when wholesale houses close The Jealousies, Line 208
 
WHOLESOME.........2
From wholesome drench of April rains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 5
Eats wholesome , sweet, and palatable food King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 27
 
WHOLLY............3
And weep? Or did ye wholly bid adieu Sleep and Poetry, Line 215
To occupy me wholly , and to fashion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 976
The region; nor bright, nor sombre wholly , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 222
 
WHOM..............24
Of thine enmossed realms: O thou, to whom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 251
"Thou, to whom every faun and satyr flies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 263
"O known Unknown! from whom my being sips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 739
Each tender maiden whom he once thought fair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 892
Dismay'd; and, like a wretch from whom the rack Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 256
Shall stand before him; whom he shall direct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 709
All lovers, whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
Aquarius! to whom king Jove has given Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 582
And whom they thought to injure they befriended. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 94
"O ye, whom wrath consumes! who, passion-stung, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 173
Now comes the pain of truth, to whom 'tis pain; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 202
Save one whom none regarded, Clymene; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 248
Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 48
The last, whom I love more, the more of blame Ode on Indolence, Line 28
Concerning whom or what? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60b
Whom I have known from her first infancy, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
Out of his sight a father whom he loves; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 22
A nymph, to whom all hoofed Satyrs knelt; Lamia, Part I, Line 14
"But those to whom the miseries of the world The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 148
"They whom thou spak'st of are no vision'ries," The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 161
Whose altar this; for whom this incense curls: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 212
Whom thou saw'st step from yon forlornest wood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 333
Whom with his sword swift-drawn and nimbly held, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 46
Whom , with but one attendant, safely lain The Jealousies, Line 34
 
WHOOP.............1
She clapp'd her hands three times, and cried out ' Whoop !'- The Jealousies, Line 673
 
WHORTLE...........1
Red whortle -berries droop above my head, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 298
 
WHOSO.............2
Its voice mysterious, which whoso hears To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 7
Thus breath'd he to himself: " Whoso encamps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 142
 
WI'...............1
Her cheek was flush wi' timid blood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 27
 
WICKED............4
Bane of every wicked spell; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 63
From wicked men like thee. Go, go!- I deem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 143
Where the most wicked Princess is? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gonfrid, Line 8a
Dungeoner of my friends, that wicked strand What can I do to drive away, Line 32
 
WICKEDNESS........2
Shall I go myself? Monstrous wickedness ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 3
O wickedness ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 217b
 
WICKER............1
Each having a white wicker over brimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 137
 
WIDE..............88
Then, through thy temple wide , melodious swells Ode to Apollo, Line 13
Round the wide hall, and show their happy faces; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 42
To see wide plains, fair trees and lawny slope: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 66
Is the swift opening of their wide portal, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 30
When these enchanted portals open wide , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 33
Swiftly I mount, upon wide spreading pinions, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 105
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 5
Who on Helvellyn's summit, wide awake, Addressed to the Same, Line 3
Of the wide spheres - an everlasting tone. To Kosciusko, Line 4
Of thy wide heaven - Should I rather kneel Sleep and Poetry, Line 49
Of thy wide heaven; yet, to my ardent prayer, Sleep and Poetry, Line 55
Then the events of this wide world I'd seize Sleep and Poetry, Line 81
There was wide wand'ring for the greediest eye, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 15
That we might look into a forest wide , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 152
Queen of the wide air; thou most lovely queen I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 205
To a wide lawn, whence one could only see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 82
Night-swollen mushrooms? Are not our wide plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 215
There shot a golden splendour far and wide , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 350
Their fellow huntsmen o'er the wide champaign Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 386
Spreading imaginary pinions wide . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 586
Is of too wide , too rainbow-large a scope, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 775
Wide sea, that one continuous murmur breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 16
For with wide eye he wonders, and smiles oft. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 63
Dear goddess, help! or the wide -gaping air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 194
Of a wide outlet, fathomless and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 272
Where dost thou listen to the wide halloos Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 307
Or drop a seed, till thou wast wide awake; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 154
Wide o'er the swelling streams: and constantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 365
"In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 689
Moved either host. On a wide sand they met, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
So wide was Neptune's hall: and as the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 868
All mountain-rivers lost in the wide home Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 949
I sat a weeping: in the whole world wide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 183
Into the wide stream came of purple hue- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 195
We dance before him thorough kingdoms wide :- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 225
"Over wide streams and mountains great we went, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 239
Through the wide forest - a most fearful tone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 323
And catch the cheated eye in wide surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 341
Wide pinions to keep here; nor do I dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 356
Their full-veined ears, nostrils blood wide , and stop; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 400
Since I saw thee, I have been wide awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 855
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 13
Of Cynthia:- the wide palace of the sun; Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 2
The rocks were silent - the wide sea did weave Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 90
A thousand men in troubles wide and dark: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 118
And, after looking round the champaign wide , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 347
Eagles may seem to sleep wing- wide upon the air; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 19
Moon, keep wide thy golden ears; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 10
Open wide the mind's cage-door, Fancy, Line 7
And so it chanc'd, for many a door was wide , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 29
To spirits of the air, and visions wide : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 202
Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 250
Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 296
Now wide awake, the vision of her sleep: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 299
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
They glide, like phantoms, into the wide hall; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 361
Beauty before the wide world never knew- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 24
Who on wide plains gather in panting troops, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 199
Clear'd them of heavy vapours, burst them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 267
Eager to sail their orb; the porches wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 297
Lifted his curved lids, and kept them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 351
Until it ceas'd; and still he kept them wide : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 352
Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
And in her wide imagination stood Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 58
O Heaven wide ! O unseen parent dear! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 159
Wide glaring for revenge!"- As this he said, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 324
Pour into the wide hollows of my brain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 117
With horrid warning gaped wide , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 42
In the earth's wide entrails old Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 69
And in the midst of this wide quietness Ode to Psyche, Line 58
This Conrad's gates, to the wide air again. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 84
More than my love, and these wide realms in fee? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
A wide world, where a thousand new-born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
Of a wide empire, like a glowing moon; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 80
Hot, glaz'd, and wide , with lid-lashes all sear, Lamia, Part I, Line 151
To the wide -spreaded night above her towers. Lamia, Part I, Line 354
Of the wide doors disclos'd a place unknown Lamia, Part I, Line 388
My presence in wide Corinth hardly known: Lamia, Part II, Line 93
The glowing banquet-room shone with wide -arched grace. Lamia, Part II, Line 121
Whose slender feet wide -swerv'd upon the soft Lamia, Part II, Line 178
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 329
Who on a wide plain gather in sad troops, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 43
While the wide din of battle dies away King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 3
Of the wide kingdom's rule and government, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 12
And as she would be frighten'd wide awake The Jealousies, Line 488
Through the wide air to Kent this morn I glide!" The Jealousies, Line 527
At the open doors, with wide saluting eyes, The Jealousies, Line 758
 
WIDENED...........1
Widened a little, as when Zephyr bids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 763
 
WIDENESS..........1
Feast them upon the wideness of the sea; On the Sea, Line 10
 
WIDENESSES........1
Ere I can have explored its widenesses . Sleep and Poetry, Line 309
 
WIDENING..........3
A black-eyed swan upon the widening stream; To George Felton Mathew, Line 87
The widening circles into nothing gone. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 18
And make the widening circlets of your eyes Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 85
 
WIDER.............2
The archers too, upon a wider plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 332
Some wider -domed high magnificence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 34
 
WIDEST............1
Into the widest alley they all past, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 126
 
WIDOW'D...........2
And most forlorn upon that widow'd bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 859
I sue not for my lone, my widow'd wife; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 545
 
WIDOW'S...........1
Poor Girl! put on thy stifling widow's weed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 229
 
WIDTH.............1
Or height, or depth, or width , or any chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 357
 
WIELD.............1
And strives in vain to unsettle and wield Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 414
 
WIELDS............1
As is the wand that queen Titania wields . To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 8
 
WIFE..............10
Be the summer's wife . Hither, hither, love, Line 12
I sue not for my lone, my widow'd wife ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 545
Stab him! O sweetest wife ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 73b
Your wife ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 74b
Wife ! so soon! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 75a
Aye, wife ! Oh, impudence! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 75b
Wife ! Why dost linger on that syllable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
Being a wife most mild and dutiful. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 77
For the sake of my fair newly wedded wife , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 142
An immaterial wife to espouse as heaven's boon. The Jealousies, Line 27
 
WIGHT.............5
Be jealous that the foot of other wight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 59
might/ Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight / [As I suppose] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
How lightning-swift the change! a youthful wight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 775
By chilly finger'd spring. "Unhappy wight ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 971
To some wight , amaz'd to hear Robin Hood, Line 17
 
WIGS..............1
Powder'd bag- wigs and ruffy-tuffy heads The Jealousies, Line 770
 
WILD..............71
'Tis still! - Wild warblings from the AEolian lyre Ode to Apollo, Line 34
Its spray that the wild flower kindly bedews. To Some Ladies, Line 8
Why linger you so, the wild labyrinth strolling? To Some Ladies, Line 9
Wild strains to which, spell-bound, the nightingales listened; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 30
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 8
Some flowery spot, sequester'd, wild , romantic, To George Felton Mathew, Line 37
For thou wast once a flowret blooming wild , To George Felton Mathew, Line 76
In dark green ivy, and among wild larches? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
Of the wild cat's eyes, or the silvery stems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 50
High as the berries of a wild ash tree, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 114
Mysterious, wild , the far heard trumpet's tone; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 156
A fragrant wild , with Nature's beauty drest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 7
I saw the sweetest flower wild nature yields, To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 5
Make pleasing music, and not wild uproar. How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 14
Look'd at each other with a wild surmise- On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 13
Bubbles a pipe; fine sounds are floating wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 228
And some are hearing, eagerly, the wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 370
A filbert hedge with wild briar overtwined, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 35
And garlands woven of flowers wild , and sweet, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 155
And then I run into most wild surmises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 13
Wild thyme, and valley-lilies whiter still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 157
When snouted wild -boars routing tender corn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 282
More subtle cadenced, more forest wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 494
Bluster'd, and slept, and its wild self did teaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 687
I sat contemplating the figures wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 886
Stems the upbursting cold: a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
To fainting creatures in a desert wild . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 119
To wild uncertainty and shadows grim. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 273
Of rivers, nor hill-flowers running wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 286
Favour this gentle youth; his days are wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 549
Leading afar past wild magnificence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 598
To scud like a wild bird, and take thee off Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 698
Of his white palace in wild forest nook, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 890
She fathoms eddies, and runs wild about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 87
Oh what a wild and harmonized tune Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 170
Upon my wild conjecturing: truth had come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 556
Into the dungeon core of that wild wood: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 565
And garlanding grew wild ; and pleasure reign'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 934
Long didst thou sit amid our regions wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 8
To our wild minstrelsy!' Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 227
Unfaded amaranth, when wild it strays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 783
Adieu!" Whereat those maidens, with wild stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 903
As doth a mother wild God of the meridian, Line 13
She would weep that her wild bees Robin Hood, Line 46
There is Wild Wood, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 13
And make the wild fern for a bed do? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 20
No wild boar tushes, and no mermaid's toes: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 16
Of periwinkle and wild strawberry, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 101
Alas! when passion is both meek and wild ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 48
Its eyes, though wild , were still all dewy bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 289
She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 403
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
O' the western wild , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 50
O' the western wild , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 55
Amid the woods they were, so lone and wild , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 5
Soon wild commotions shook him, and made flush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 124
And her eyes were wild . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 16
And honey wild , and manna dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 26
And there I shut her wild eyes La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 31
Fledge the wild -ridged mountains steep by steep; Ode to Psyche, Line 55
The grass, the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 45
What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 10
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
More calm; his features are less wild and flush'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 47
And rested at the foot of those wild hills, Lamia, Part I, Line 175
Her wild and timid nature to his aim: Lamia, Part II, Line 71
Trac'd upon vellum or wild Indian leaf The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 5
Whose arms spread straggling in wild serpent forms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 447
She was born at midnight in an Indian wild ; The Jealousies, Line 390
The craggy hollowness of a wild -reefed shore. The Jealousies, Line 738
Lords, scullions, deputy-scullions, with wild cries The Jealousies, Line 763
 
WILDER'D..........2
Look not so wilder'd ; for these things are true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 850
The wilder'd stranger - seeming not to see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 219
 
WILDERING.........1
More wildering than all that hoarse affright; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 528
 
WILDERNESS........4
My herald thought into a wilderness : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 59
Through wilderness , and woods of mossed oaks; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 49
Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 250
Of honour 'mid the growling wilderness . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 12
 
WILDERNESSES......1
His forest wildernesses . I have clung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 636
 
WILDEST...........1
The room with wildest forms and shades, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 85
 
WILDLY............3
Whence genius wildly flash'd, and high debate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 4
Babbling so wildly of its lovely daughters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 42
Yet mutter'd wildly . I could hear he lov'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 567
 
WILDS.............2
About the wilds they hunt with spear and horn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 255
About these thornless wilds ; her pleasant days Lamia, Part I, Line 95
 
WILES.............1
At my lost brightness, my impassion'd wiles , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 783
 
WILL'D............1
How, ever, where she will'd , her spirit went; Lamia, Part I, Line 205
 
WILL'T............1
Will't please your Highness enter, and accept Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 77
 
WILLIAM...........1
High-minded and unbending William Wallace. To George Felton Mathew, Line 69
 
WILLIE............1
First Willie on his sleek mare came Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 17
 
WILLING...........4
A thousand willing agents to obey, Sleep and Poetry, Line 239
For willing service; whether to surprise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 264
Came blushing, waning, willing , and afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 635
In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 6
 
WILLOW............6
About old forests; while the willow trails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 43
In tender pressure. And as a willow keeps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 446
A willow -bough, distilling odorous dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 424
Sad Zephyr droops the clouds like weeping willow : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 369
And your shawl I hang up on this willow , Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 14
The leaves of willow and of adder's tongue; Lamia, Part II, Line 224
 
WILLOWS...........1
Wreather of poppy buds, and weeping willows ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 14
 
WILSON............1
Stands next door to Wilson the Hosier. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 6
 
WILT..............34
Thou wilt think that some amorous zephyr is nigh; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 14
And then, thou wilt know that the sigh comes from me. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 16
Alas! thou this wilt never do: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 65
And wilt surely never spill Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 67
Him thou wilt hear; so I will rest in hope Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 65
"Write! thou wilt never have a better day." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 100
Endymion! one day thou wilt be blest: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 573
That breath about my eyes? Ah, thou wilt steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 745
Thou wilt be gone away, and wilt not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 747
Thou wilt be gone away, and wilt not heed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 747
Or thou wilt force me from this secrecy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 780
And thou wilt see the issue."- 'Mid the sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 771
Visit my Cytherea: thou wilt find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 918
Yet if thou wilt behold all beauty's store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 58
Will slime the rose to night. Though if thou wilt , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 133
Wilt fall asleep? O let me sip that tear! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 318
All through the teeming year: so thou wilt shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 661
Wilt thou devote this body to the earth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 731
Wilt be content to dwell with her, to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 871
To-day thou wilt not see him, nor to-morrow, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 231
"Ah! why wilt thou affright a feeble soul? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 154
Her own lute thou wilt see: no time to spare, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 175
For there thou wilt find Saturn, and his woes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 346
Leave them, O Muse! for thou anon wilt find Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 7
For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 20
What swift death wilt thou die? As to the lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 171
Wilt thou infuriate me? Proof! Thou fool! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 198
Why wilt thou tease impossibility Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 199
Albert, wilt thou follow there? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 245b
Wilt thou creep dastardly behind his back, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 246
O, unbenignest Love, why wilt thou let Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 29
Wilt thou forsake him at his latest hour? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 12
Wilt thou forgive me? And thou, holy man, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 171
If thou wilt , as thou swearest, grant my boon!" Lamia, Part I, Line 111
 
WILY..............2
For, as I hear, the wily enemy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 134
First wily Crafticant, the chamberlain, The Jealousies, Line 580
 
WIN...............9
So with the horrors past thou'lt win thy happier fate. On Peace, Line 14
A melancholy spirit well might win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 98
Would at high Jove's empyreal footstool win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 378
Ah! when a soul doth thus its freedom win , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 219
And see what more my phantasy can win . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 47
And win perhaps that night a peerless bride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 167
That shadowy thought can win , Ode to Psyche, Line 65
Unless perchance I might rejoice to win Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 23
And knowing surely she could never win Lamia, Part II, Line 113
 
WINCE.............1
I'll make the opposition-benches wince , The Jealousies, Line 138
 
WIND..............38
What is more gentle than a wind in summer? Sleep and Poetry, Line 1
And clumps of woodbine taking the soft wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 36
On the smooth wind to realms of wonderment; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 142
Nought but a lovely sighing of the wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 160
By every wind that nods the mountain pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 261
Who, suddenly, should stoop through the smooth wind , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 381
From out her cradle shell. The wind out-blows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 627
A half-forgetfulness in mountain wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 980
Those same dark curls blown vagrant in the wind ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 562
Moving about as in a gentle wind , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 616
By a cavern wind unto a forest old; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 831
Should be engulphed in the eddying wind . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 846
Can make a ladder of the eternal wind , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 26
Feeding from her white fingers, on the wind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 278
Yet there was not a breath of wind : she banish'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 532
This tangled thread, and wind it to a clue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 756
Of wind and waters: 'tis past human wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 826
Nor care for wind and tide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 250
And listened to the wind that now did stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 294
O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind , O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 1
Says I, 'tis the wind at a parley. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 10
An echo of thee in the north- wind sung. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 160
Fra wind and raining- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 26
Solution sweet: meantime the frost- wind blows The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 322
By no sharp north wind ever nipt, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 46
A quavering like three reeds before the wind - When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 46
There came enchantment with the shifting wind , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 276
And not a wind of heaven but will breathe Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 11
Instead of pines shall murmur in the wind : Ode to Psyche, Line 53
Sullen against the wind ! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
Sway'd by command, as corn is by the wind ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 19
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
The eastern soft wind , and his galley now Lamia, Part I, Line 223
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind ; To Autumn, Line 15
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; To Autumn, Line 29
When in mid-May the sickening east wind The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 97
Or thou might'st better listen to the wind , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 4
Swayed to and fro by every wind and tide? To Fanny, Line 38
 
WIND'S............1
Flutter'd in the besieging wind's uproar; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 359
 
WINDER............1
A ram goes bleating: Winder of the horn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 281
 
WINDING...........13
Winding through palmy fern, and rushes fenny, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 80
Whence, from a certain spot, its winding flood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 543
Through winding passages, where sameness breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 235
Through winding alleys; and lo, wonderment! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 384
One of shell- winding Triton's bright-hair'd daughters? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 691
Along the ground they took a winding course. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 926
I will delight thee all my winding course, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 988
And, ample as the largest winding -sheet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 196
Been made for Cleopatra's winding sheet; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 50
Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 40
Whither, whither is he winding ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 128a
Draws near when I must make a winding up Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 130
A winding -sheet - Ah me! I must away Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 16
 
WINDINGLY.........1
Windingly by it, so the quiet maid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 448
 
WINDINGS..........2
Went off in gentle windings to the hoar Calidore: A Fragment, Line 27
And to the windings in the foxes' hole, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 409
 
WINDOW............12
That on the window spreads its feathers light, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 44
All the green leaves that round the window clamber, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 136
Amid her window -flowers,- sighing,- weaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 28
And from her chamber- window he would catch Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 19
Yet can I ope thy window -sash to find This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 10
Against the window -panes; St. Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
And on the western window panes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 6
With forehead 'gainst the window pane; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 49
A window to her chamber neighbour'd near, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
"Open the window , Hum; I'm ready now!" The Jealousies, Line 541
Cried Elfinan, and closed the window -blind; The Jealousies, Line 597
And lighted graceful on the window -sill; The Jealousies, Line 605
 
WINDOWS...........3
The windows as if latch'd by fays and elves- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 50
Should look through four large windows , and display Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 28
Throw them from the windows ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 166
 
WINDS.............23
Looks out upon the winds with glorious fear: Sleep and Poetry, Line 128
The winds of heaven blew, the ocean roll'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 188
The shiftings of the mighty winds that blow Sleep and Poetry, Line 286
That I have not the cloudy winds to keep On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 7
When last the winds of heaven were unbound. On the Sea, Line 8
Into the winds : rain-scented eglantine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 100
Among the winds at large - that all may hearken! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 738
Of music's kiss impregnates the free winds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 784
Dark clouds, and muttering of winds morose. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 652
Among cool clouds and winds , but that the free, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 351
Up in the winds , beneath a starry roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 491
Through dangerous winds , had by my footsteps worn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 616
Sound mournfully upon the winds and low; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 445
Of admonitions to the winds and seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 109
My life is but the life of winds and tides, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 341
No more than winds and tides can I avail:- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 342
And the beams of still Vesper, when winds are all whist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 98
For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 10
In wintry winds the simple snow is safe, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 26
Or nature's rocks toil'd hard in waves and winds , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 69
Whose winds , all zephyrless, hold scourging rods, What can I do to drive away, Line 37
Speed giving to the winds her lustrous hair; The Jealousies, Line 41
In echoing places; when the winds respire, The Jealousies, Line 571
 
WINE..............52
Hast thou a goblet for dark sparkling wine ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 5
Give me women, wine , and snuff Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 1
When butts of wine are drunk off to the lees? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 36
And, when upheld, the wine from each bright jar To My Brother George (epistle), Line 41
Because my wine was of too poor a savour To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 25
Of mingled wine , out-sparkling generous light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 154
With wine , in honour of the shepherd-god. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 226
Upon these living flowers. Here is wine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 441
For as delicious wine doth, sparkling, dive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 511
These tenderest, and by the nectar- wine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 760
My goblet full of wine - my topmost deed:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 168
The two deliverers tasted a pure wine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 801
And little rills of crimson wine imbrued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 212
' For wine , for wine we left our kernel tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 232
' For wine, for wine we left our kernel tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 232
For wine we left our heath, and yellow brooms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 233
For wine we follow Bacchus through the earth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 235
And honeysuckles full of clear bee- wine . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 698
Than mine host's Canary wine ? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 6
My wine overbrims a whole summer; Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 6
And may it taste to you like good old wine , Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 19
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
My wine - O good! 'tis here at my desire, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 70
Ne cared he for wine , or half and half, Character of C.B., Line 10
Let the red wine within the goblet boil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 18
And deify me, as if some blithe wine Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 118
The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
And precious goblets that make rich the wine . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
And a nice judge in the age and smack of wine . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 11
And in-door melodies; nor the ruddy wine Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 49
Or the mad-fumed wine -? Nay, do not frown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 35
To-morrow? Ho! some wine ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 32a
No, no more wine ; methinks you've had enough. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 39
The cool wine , kiss'd off with a soldier's smack: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 30
His wine is bitter, for you are not there; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 63
In a deep goblet: let me see - what wine ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 120
Or of old AEtna's pulpy wine -presses, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 123
Of Ceres' horn, and, in huge vessels, wine Lamia, Part II, Line 187
At first, for scarcely was the wine at flow; Lamia, Part II, Line 202
Now, when the wine has done its rosy deed, Lamia, Part II, Line 209
No more so strange; for merry wine , sweet wine, Lamia, Part II, Line 211
No more so strange; for merry wine, sweet wine , Lamia, Part II, Line 211
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Shall I gulp wine ? No, that is vulgarism, What can I do to drive away, Line 24
No,- wine is only sweet to happy men; What can I do to drive away, Line 27
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
Fear not, quake not, and as good wine recruits The Jealousies, Line 358
But let me cool your brandy with a little wine ." The Jealousies, Line 414
Some lady's fingers nice in Candy wine ; The Jealousies, Line 429
And take some more wine , Hum;- O, heavens! I burn The Jealousies, Line 530
(I own it,)- have made too free with his wine ; The Jealousies, Line 614
 
WINES.............1
Like three fit wines in a cup, Fancy, Line 38
 
WING..............24
Yes! patient plume thy little wing , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 7
To those who strove with the bright golden wing To George Felton Mathew, Line 63
And seems from purple clouds to wing its flight. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 45
Perhaps on the wing of poesy upsoar,- Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 12
Catches his freshness from archangel's wing : Addressed to the Same, Line 4
Beneath thy drowsy wing a triple hour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 462
But by a patient wing , a constant spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 24
She fled me swift as sea-bird on the wing , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 404
Then Love took wing , and from his pinions shed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 891
I die - I hear her voice - I feel my wing -" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1012
' We follow Bacchus! Bacchus on the wing . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 222
Then there's a little wing , far from the sun, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 45
As bird on wing to breast its eggs again; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 470
Eagles may seem to sleep wing -wide upon the air; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 19
When the hen-bird's wing doth rest Fancy, Line 61
Ah! woe is me! poor Silver- wing ! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 1
Poor Silver- wing ! Ah! woe is me! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 5
A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 333
Ever let my nourish'd wing , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 7
The bridal embassy had taken wing , The Jealousies, Line 128
But swift of look, and foot, and wing was he,)- The Jealousies, Line 186
To be upon the wing ! Now, now, that minx I spurn!" The Jealousies, Line 531
Thank you, old mummy!- now securely I take wing ." The Jealousies, Line 603
Shed a quill-feather from my larboard wing - The Jealousies, Line 713
 
WING'D............5
The freaks, and dartings of the black- wing'd swallow, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 14
Fire- wing'd , and make a morning in his mirth: Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 8
On love, and wing'd St. Agnes' saintly care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
With music wing'd instead of silent plumes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 287
Freckle- wing'd and lizard-sided! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 73
 
WINGED............24
Or as the winged cap of Mercury. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 115
And the broad winged sea-gull never at rest; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
Went swift beneath the merry- winged guide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
Look! how those winged listeners all this while Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 493
And now, O winged Chieftain! thou hast sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 100
At his right hand stood winged Love, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 864
"Bright- winged Child! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 978
Those winged steeds, with snorting nostrils bold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 364
Those two on winged steeds, with all the stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 390
Then let winged fancy wander Fancy, Line 5
Let, then, winged Fancy find Fancy, Line 79
Let the winged Fancy roam, Fancy, Line 93
The winged Lion of St. Mark, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 35
His winged minions in close clusters stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 197
By noble winged creatures he hath made? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 235
That was before we knew the winged thing, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 341
The winged Psyche with awaken'd eyes? Ode to Psyche, Line 6
The winged boy I knew; Ode to Psyche, Line 21
That thou, light- winged Dryad of the trees, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 7
Burnt from his winged heels to either ear, Lamia, Part I, Line 23
And but the flitter- winged verse must tell, Lamia, Part I, Line 394
His winged minions in close clusters stand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 41
A troop of winged janizaries flew; The Jealousies, Line 587
While that fair Princess, from her winged chair, The Jealousies, Line 740
 
WINGEDLY..........1
So wingedly : when we combine therewith, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 813
 
WINGING...........1
Winging along where the great water throes? What can I do to drive away, Line 17
 
WINGS.............73
But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings To Hope, Line 41
Dip so refreshingly its wings , and breast Calidore: A Fragment, Line 16
And scales upon the beauty of its wings . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 37
That float about the air on azure wings , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 74
With outspread wings the Naiad Zephyr courts, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 6
And half discovered wings , and glances keen. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 8
Than wings of swans, than doves, than dim-seen eagle? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
Wings to find out an immortality. Sleep and Poetry, Line 84
And now broad wings . Most awfully intent, Sleep and Poetry, Line 151
Melt my Dedalian wings , and drive me down Sleep and Poetry, Line 303
A butterfly, with golden wings broad parted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 343
Of out-spread wings , and from between them shone Sleep and Poetry, Line 393
As though the fanning wings of Mercury I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 24
With wings of gentle flush o'er delicate white, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 58
Or perhaps, to show their black, and golden wings , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 91
When it is moving on luxurious wings , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 131
Forgive me that I have not eagle's wings - To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
Would often beat its wings , and often too Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 87
Their freckled wings ; yea, the fresh budding year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 259
Trembling its closed eyes and sleeked wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 468
Of colours, wings , and bursts of spangly light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 569
And meet so nearly, that with wings outraught, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 866
A golden butterfly; upon whose wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 61
Large wings upon my shoulders, and point out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 178
Muffling to death the pathos with his wings ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 421
Towards him a large eagle, 'twixt whose wings , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 658
Will shade us with their wings . Those fitful sighs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 981
Buzz from their honied wings : and thou shouldst please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 997
Our spirit's wings : despondency besets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 22
Who stolen hast away the wings wherewith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 109
Each with large dark blue wings upon his back. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 344
Their wings chivalrous into the clear air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 482
Not Hesperus: lo! upon his silver wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 567
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
Give me new phoenix wings to fly at my desire. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 14
And havens of repose, when his tired wings Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 9
P'rhaps one or two, whose lives have patient wings , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 14
Love meanwhile held her dearly with his wings , Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 5
With hair blown back, and wings put cross-wise on their breasts. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 36
As are the tiger-moth's deep-damask'd wings ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 213
Save wings , for heaven:- Porphyro grew faint: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 224
The stars of heaven, and angels' wings , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 30
With wings or chariot fierce to repossess Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 123
Flush'd angerly: while sometimes eagle's wings , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 182
And made their dove- wings tremble. On he flared, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 217
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 284
Those silver wings expanded sisterly, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 296
Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
For when the Muse's wings are air-ward spread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 82
Because it cooeth, and hath snowy wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 222
Like one who once had wings .- O why should I Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 91
But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 33
And ached for wings , because I knew the three: Ode on Indolence, Line 24
They faded, and, forsooth! I wanted wings : Ode on Indolence, Line 31
For you, whose wings so shadow over me Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 138
With such a tender grace; nor are her wings Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
Who vails its snowy wings and grows all pale- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
A glue upon my wings , that cannot spread, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 13
Into his mantle, adding wings to haste, Lamia, Part I, Line 367
Hover'd and buzz'd his wings , with fearful roar, Lamia, Part II, Line 13
There was a noise of wings , till in short space Lamia, Part II, Line 120
Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings , Lamia, Part II, Line 234
As if with wings ; but the fair trees were gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 59
And made their dove- wings tremble: on he flared The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 61
My muse had wings , What can I do to drive away, Line 11
Upon their wings , they bore in bright array, The Jealousies, Line 35
Of faeries stooping on their wings sublime The Jealousies, Line 98
Lifted his wings , and stood attentive-wise. The Jealousies, Line 497
"Those wings to Canterbury you must beat, The Jealousies, Line 498
Borne upon wings ,- and very pleased she feels The Jealousies, Line 593
From twelve to half-past - wings not fit to fly The Jealousies, Line 646
Upon the laden wings that scantly could respire. The Jealousies, Line 666
 
WINK..............8
A coward, did my very eye-lids wink Sleep and Poetry, Line 299
Which, in a wink , to watery gauze refin'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 617
Before young Bacchus' eye- wink turning pale.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
The old man may sleep, and the planets may wink ; Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 20
And fall they must, ere a star wink thrice Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 14
Tipping the wink to him was heathen Greek; Character of C.B., Line 20
Those grey lids wink , and thou not know it, monk! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
But, in a wink , their splendour they regain'd, The Jealousies, Line 174
 
WINKING...........1
With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 17
 
WINNING...........3
Thy winning graces; - to be thy defender Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 11
Though winning near the goal - yet, do not grieve; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 18
Their weak rebellion, winning me with lies, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 74
 
WINNOW............1
And winnow from the coming step of time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 819
 
WINNOWING.........1
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind; To Autumn, Line 15
 
WINTER............11
On a lone winter evening, when the frost On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 10
Of winter hoar. Then came another crowd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 161
Of this still region all his winter -sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 480
In Autumn's sickle, Winter frosty hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 423
He hath his winter too of pale misfeature, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 13
The breath of Winter comes from far away, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 250
Let not quick Winter chill its dying hour!- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 450
And the snake all winter -thin Fancy, Line 57
And the warm angled winter screen, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 77
When Winter lifts his voice; there is a noise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 117
That they, against the winter of thy sire, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
 
WINTER'S..........4
Many times have winter's shears, Robin Hood, Line 6
O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 1
From winter's ague, for one hour's gleam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 6
Spirit of a winter's night; Fancy, Line 18
 
WINTERY...........1
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
 
WINTRY............9
O may no wintry season, bare and hoary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 54
When last the wintry gusts gave over strife Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 920
Leave melodizing on this wintry day, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 3
For an inhabitant of wintry earth Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 6
"Love! thou art leading me from wintry cold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 65
Whose heart had brooded, all that wintry day, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 43
Full on this casement shone the wintry moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 217
In wintry winds the simple snow is safe, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 26
Beckon me out into the wintry air. To Fanny, Line 8

Published @ RC

March 2005