Wip-Wz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
WIPE..............2
All chaff of custom, wipe away all slime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 820
To burst with hoarest thunderings, and wipe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 348
 
WIPING............1
See, in another picture, nymphs are wiping Sleep and Poetry, Line 372
 
WIS...............1
As he retired, an hour ago I wis , The Jealousies, Line 286
 
WISDOM............4
Of spanning wisdom ; though I do not know Sleep and Poetry, Line 285
Wisdom , though fled far away. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 36
Their wisdom long since fled.- Two wings this orb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 283
Which by thy wisdom will I ever keep. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 9
 
WISE..............19
Men were thought wise who could not understand Sleep and Poetry, Line 184
In through the woven roof, and fluttering- wise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 426
Was I in no wise startled. So recline Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 440
That I am wise , that Pallas is a dunce- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 799
Put cross- wise to its heart. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 744a
In such wise , in such temper, so aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 490
To shew this castle in fair dreaming wise Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 31
Calm speculation; but if you are wise , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 183
For who has mind to relish, Minos- wise , On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 9
In short, convince you that however wise Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 1
A viol, bow strings torn, cross- wise upon Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 40
With hair blown back, and wings put cross- wise on their breasts. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 36
The slang of cities in no wise he knew, Character of C.B., Line 19
"Or shall we listen to the over- wise , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 309
Two or three wise men Two or three posies, Line 5
Conrad, if he flames longer in this wise Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
Sister, you have grown sensible and wise , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
From the Viceroy of Zanguebar,- wise , slow The Jealousies, Line 184
Lifted his wings, and stood attentive- wise . The Jealousies, Line 497
 
WISH..............10
Complete my joy - let not my first wish fail, On Peace, Line 7
Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 37
mythology of Greece, and dulled its brightness: for I wish to try once more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
Would pass the very hardest gazer's wish , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 208
Of old romance. These let us wish away, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 41
Whatever he shall wish , betide her weal or woe. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 162
He doth this moment wish himself asleep Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 91
'Tis not for worldly pomp I wish to see King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 19
That thou would wish thine own heart dry of blood, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 5
(Who wish to give the devil her due) declare The Jealousies, Line 745
 
WISH'D............5
In those still moments I have wish'd you joys To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 127
Another wish'd , mid that eternal spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 378
And wish'd with silent curses in my grave, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 122
She wish'd a game at whist - made three revokes- The Jealousies, Line 700
Wish'd , trusted, hoped 'twas no sign of decay- The Jealousies, Line 714
 
WISHES............3
The Emperor's anxious wishes - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 129a
You will to-morrow succumb to his wishes , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
To thy far wishes will thy streams obey: Lamia, Part I, Line 262
 
WISHEST...........1
"It shall be as thou wishest ," said the Dame: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 172
 
WISHING...........1
Earnestly round as wishing to espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 112
 
WIST..............2
might/ Rest I ne wist , for there n'as erthly wight/ [As I suppose] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
Vaprous doth hide them; just so much I wist Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 4
 
WIT...............6
Till, like the certain wands of Jacob's wit , Sleep and Poetry, Line 198
He saw not fiercer wonders - past the wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 249
Of wind and waters: 'tis past human wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 826
A longer skein of wit in Convent Garden. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 4
Completion of all delicate nature's wit ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36
"He's not asleep, and you have little wit ," The Jealousies, Line 329
 
WITCH.............7
Before the fierce witch , speaking thus aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 538
Glaring the angry witch . O Dis, even now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 567
O vulture- witch , hast never heard of mercy? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 620
One half of the witch in me. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 645a
Built by a Lapland witch turn'd maudlin nun- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 46
Of witch , and demon, and large coffin-worm, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 374
Terrier, ferret them out! Burn - burn the witch ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 138
 
WITCH'S...........2
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
Thou must hold water in a witch's sieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 120
 
WITCHES...........1
And witches There was a naughty boy, Line 43
 
WITCHING..........1
'Tis the " witching time of night"- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 1
 
WITHAL............2
Of his proud horse's mane: he was withal Calidore: A Fragment, Line 111
May be confounded and abash'd withal , Lamia, Part II, Line 58
 
WITHER............6
If I die and wither Hither, hither, love, Line 23
And wither drearily on barren moors: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 287
For I no more shall wither , droop, and pine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 254
But live and wither , cripple and still breathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 597
O leave the palm to wither by itself; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 449
Will wither in few years, and vanish so The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 111
 
WITHER'D..........9
Himself on wither'd leaves, even as though Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 565
Till round his wither'd lips had gone a smile. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 225
Gaunt, wither'd , sapless, feeble, cramp'd, and lame. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 638
The sedge has wither'd from the lake, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 3
Though the sedge is wither'd from the lake, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 47
Is to be ashes!- wither'd up to death! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 194
Pearls, while on land they wither'd and adored. Lamia, Part I, Line 16
Wither'd at dew so sweet and virulent; Lamia, Part I, Line 149
The pale Omega of a wither'd race, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 288
 
WITHERETH.........1
Fast withereth too. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 12
 
WITHERING.........1
Aye, 'bove the withering of old-lipp'd Fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 29
 
WITHERS...........2
Among the dead: She withers , like a palm Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 447
My sweet bride withers at their potency." Lamia, Part II, Line 290
 
WITHHELD..........2
Withheld me first; and then decrees of fate; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 990
Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 1
 
WITHHOLD..........1
Withhold no atom's atom or I die, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 10
 
WITHIN............33
Within my breast; so that the morning light Sleep and Poetry, Line 399
Knowing within myself the manner in which this Poem has Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
Within a little space again it gave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 117
That toiling years would put within my grasp, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 524
Dream within dream!" - "She took an airy range, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
Circled a million times within the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 752
To one, who keeps within his steadfast aim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 848
Within my breast there lives a choking flame- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 317
The burning prayer within him; so, bent low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 546
Working within him into something dreary,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 634
Grew strong within me: wherefore serve me so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 971
Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 64
Within its pearly house.- The mighty deeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 68
Shed balmy consciousness within that bower. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 466
Just within ken, they saw descending thick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 820
" Within his car, aloft, young Bacchus stood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 209
Leaving old Sleep within his vapoury lair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 483
Yet all is still within and desolate. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 528
Beset with plainful gusts, within ye hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 529
Say, is not bliss within our perfect seisure? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 720
Fell sick within the rose's just domain, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 34
And it shall comfort me within the tomb. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 304
Within these roofless walls, where yet O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 2
While far within each aisle and deep recess, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 196
Let the red wine within the goblet boil, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 18
Swift be your steed! Within this hour Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 78b
He met within the murmurous vestibule Lamia, Part II, Line 163
Growing within , I ate deliciously; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 40
A power within me of enormous ken, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 303
While, far within each aisle and deep recess, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 40
Trespass within the circuit of his sword:- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 15
Alas! my wearied heart within me sinks, The Jealousies, Line 165
(Of pastry he got store within the palace,) The Jealousies, Line 218
 
WITHOUT...........68
Without that modest softening that enhances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 3
Felton! without incitements such as these, To George Felton Mathew, Line 72
But what, without the social thought of thee, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 13
A laughing school-boy, without grief or care, Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
Ah, sure no tasteful nook would be without them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 30
So, without more ado, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 16
produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
Endymion too, without a forest peer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 190
Without one muse's smile, or kind behest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 37
Us young immortals, without any let, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 487
Without one impious word, himself he flings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 659
Without an echo? Then shall I be left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 684
And so I can prepare without a sigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 316
Without one hope, without one faintest trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 640
Without one hope, without one faintest trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 640
Opened again, and from without , in shone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 992
Alone, without a peer: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 271
Fearless for power of thought, without thine aid?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 361
Can't be got without hard money! Robin Hood, Line 48
So without any fuss, any hawing and humming, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
Without some stir of heart, some malady; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 4
Where, without any word, from stabs he fell. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 296
And without There was a naughty boy, Line 50
Without your paying me one compliment. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 5
It swallows cabbages without a spoon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 11
Seem'd taking flight for heaven, without a death, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 8
Dream, and so dream all night without a stir, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 75
Without a motion, save of their big hearts Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 26
Still without intermission speaking thus: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 326
With buds, and bells, and stars without a name, Ode to Psyche, Line 61
Who have not learnt to be content without her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 6
To steal away, and leave without a task Ode on Indolence, Line 14
So it is like to do, without my prayers, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 125
Without design indeed,- yet it is so,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
Smooth, without clashing cymbal, tones of peace Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 48
Nay, nay, without more words, dost know of him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 67
For, without thee, this day I might have been Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 166
And then they own'd themselves without a blush, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 81
Without that tyrant temper, you so blame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 8
Without proof could you think me innocent? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 42
( without ). Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.b to Line 80b
Generously, without more certain guarantee, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 109
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 53b
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 54b
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 54c
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 55b
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 56a
( without ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 56c
Without credentials. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 110a
We are without conjecture; not a soul Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 274
Silent,- without revenge,- pshaw!- bitter end,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
The sword has done its worst; not without worst Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 5
(indistinctly without ) Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 39
Without surprise, his questions, howe'er strange. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 18
Flash'd phosphor and sharp sparks, without one cooling tear. Lamia, Part I, Line 152
The cruel lady, without any show Lamia, Part I, Line 290
For that she was a woman, and without Lamia, Part I, Line 306
Without the aid of love; yet in content Lamia, Part I, Line 314
Without a gap, yet ne'er before had seen Lamia, Part II, Line 154
Had fix'd his eye, without a twinkle or stir Lamia, Part II, Line 246
Dream, and so dream all night, without a noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 374
Moneta silent. Without stay or prop The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 388
Unmask'd, and being seen - without a blot! I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 4
Full soldier as he is, and without peer King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 31
Zodiac will not move without a sly douceur! The Jealousies, Line 297
"Venus won't stir a peg without a fee, The Jealousies, Line 298
Without a little conjuring." "'Tis Pearl, The Jealousies, Line 382
"Do put them out, and, without more ado, The Jealousies, Line 483
 
WITHOUTEN.........1
I leave withouten wordes mo All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 55
 
WITLESS...........4
So witless of their doom, that verily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 492
Thus much I know, that, a poor witless elf, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 11
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
 
WITNESS...........6
Or again witness what with thee I've seen, To George Felton Mathew, Line 25
And I could witness his most kingly hour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 549
That thou hast been a witness - it must be- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 394
The teeming earth a sudden witness bore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 338
A rope-ladder for false witness . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 147a
That soldiers may bear witness how my arm King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 28
 
WITNESSETH........1
Produce more than our searching witnesseth : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 834
 
WITS..............6
Who with combined powers, their wits employ'd To George Felton Mathew, Line 6
And babbles thorough silence, till her wits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 948
Great wits in Spanish, Tuscan, and Malay. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 136
So keep your wits at work, for your own sake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
He sets his bustling household's wits at work King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 48
Her wits to 'scape away to Angle-land; The Jealousies, Line 114
 
WITT..............1
That since belong'd to Admiral De Witt , The Jealousies, Line 416
 
WITTED............1
With triumph o'er that evil- witted Duke! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 270
 
WITTOL............1
Thou liest! Thou, Auranthe's fool! A wittol ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
 
WIVES.............2
Mothers and wives ! who day by day prepare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 207
Where gingerbread wives have a scanty sale, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 3
 
WIZARD............3
And all around her shapes, wizard and brute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 500
Not the Wizard of the Dee Not Aladdin magian, Line 3
I shall believe in wizard -woven loves Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
 
WOE...............46
The enchanting tale - the tale of pleasing woe . To Lord Byron, Line 14
But let me think away those times of woe : Sleep and Poetry, Line 220
A heavenly beacon in their dreary woe . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 354
Or the old eyes dissolving at his woe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 400
Counting his woe -worn minutes, by the strokes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 50
But woe is me, I am but as a child Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 120
He had begun a plaining of his woe . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 547
Endymion: woe ! woe! is grief contain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 823
Endymion: woe! woe ! is grief contain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 823
Fair maid, be pitiful to my great woe . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 949
How chang'd, how full of ache, how gone in woe ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 80
When I have cast this serpent-skin of woe ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 240
To more immediate matter. Woe , alas! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 398
Yet ere thou leavest me in utter woe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 586
"Ah, woe is me! that I should fondly part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 30
Since to a woe like this I have been led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 90
This is this world - sweet dewy blossom!"- Woe ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 320
Woe ! Woe to that Endymion! Where is he?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 321
Woe! Woe to that Endymion! Where is he?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 321
Of new-born woe it feels more inly smart: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 519
Woe -hurricanes beat ever at the gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 527
We miscal grief, bale, sorrow, heartbreak, woe , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
Than idle ears should pleasure in their woe . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 88
Moan hither, all ye syllables of woe , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 441
Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 1
Poor Silver-wing! Ah! woe is me! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 5
Whatever he shall wish, betide her weal or woe . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 162
No uttered syllable, or, woe betide! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 203
Oh leave me not in this eternal woe , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 314
"No dream, alas! alas! and woe is mine! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 328
That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 372
More sorrow like to this, and such like woe , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 159
Made a fit roofing to this nest of woe . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 14
More thought than woe was in her dusky face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 56
Give consolation in this woe extreme. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 242
And this thing woe crept in among our hearts, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 254
So haggard and so woe -begone? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 6
And there I dream'd - Ah! woe betide! La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 34
Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 47
Pale grew her immortality, for woe Lamia, Part I, Line 104
Of sorrow for her tender favourite's woe , Lamia, Part I, Line 291
For truth's sake, what woe afterwards befel, Lamia, Part I, Line 395
Bearing more woe than all his sins deserve. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 176
More sorrow like to this, and such-like woe , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 8
To a cold dullard fay,- ah, woe betide! The Jealousies, Line 167
I' the morning, freighted with a weight of woe , The Jealousies, Line 239
 
WOES..............11
Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 149
The woes of Troy, towers smothering o'er their blaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 8
Poor lovers lay at rest from joys and woes .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 736
For, never since thy griefs and woes began, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 546
And the bright Titan, phrenzied with new woes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 299
For there thou wilt find Saturn, and his woes . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 346
With songs of misery, music of our woes ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 269
O leave them, Muse! O leave them to their woes ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 3
Upon my pillow, breeding many woes : Sonnet to Sleep, Line 10
Ay, a sweet kiss - you see your mighty woes . Lamia, Part II, Line 55
With such remorseless speed still come new woes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 366
 
WOFUL.............1
So woful , and of such deep sorrowing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 160
 
WOKE..............1
He woke as from a trance; his snow-white brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 221
 
WOLDS.............1
And purblind amid foggy, midnight wolds . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 636
 
WOLF..............1
By angry wolf , or pard with prying head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 76
 
WOLF'S............1
Wolf's -bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
 
WOLFISH...........1
While yet our England was a wolfish den; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 5
 
WOLSEY............1
Whose linsey- wolsey lining hangs all slack, The Jealousies, Line 229
 
WOLVES............3
And beard them, though they be more fang'd than wolves and bears." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 153
In feud with wolves and bears, when no eye saw Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 10
Frighten the wolves ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 57a
 
WOMAN.............13
To banish Woman from my mind. Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 4
Woman ! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 1
From lovely woman : while brimful of this, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 146
Andromeda! sweet woman ! why delaying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 602
Look, woman , look, your Albert is quite safe! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 120
Dictate my task. Sweet woman ,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 39a
It must be done as my bribed woman can Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 22
O wretched woman ! lost, wreck'd, swallow'd up, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
Tell me where that detested woman is, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 3
"I was a woman , let me have once more Lamia, Part I, Line 117
For that she was a woman , and without Lamia, Part I, Line 306
As a real woman , lineal indeed Lamia, Part I, Line 332
Must not a woman be To Fanny, Line 36
 
WOMAN'S...........12
A woman's sigh alone and in distress? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 55
Or like a beauteous woman's large blue eyes Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 53
Taking on me a woman's privilege, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 29
A woman's secret!- though a fiend she be, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 26
And shrink away from a weak woman's eye? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 247
She had a woman's mouth with all its pearls complete: Lamia, Part I, Line 60
A woman's shape, and charming as before. Lamia, Part I, Line 118
Give me my woman's form, and place me where he is. Lamia, Part I, Line 120
To hear her whisper woman's lore so well; Lamia, Part I, Line 325
More pleasantly by playing woman's part, Lamia, Part I, Line 337
And in her sorrow nearer woman's tears. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 338
Over her woman's weakness. ' Where,' cried I, The Jealousies, Line 780
 
WOMB..............1
From the old womb of night, his cave forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 372
 
WOMBS.............1
Eolian magic from their lucid wombs : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 786
 
WOMEN.............12
women ." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2. Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
Give me women , wine, and snuff Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 1
And lovely women were as fair and warm, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 219
To sudden veneration: women meek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 187
Thou wast the charm of women , lovely Moon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 169
Women gain little from experience When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 57
her robes, and a train of Women . She kneels. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
Men I have spurn'd, and women I have taunted? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 34
And there her women , in a mournful throng, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 2
[The doors open. Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
Men, women , rich and poor, in the cool hours, Lamia, Part I, Line 355
For love of mortal women , maidens fair, The Jealousies, Line 5
 
WON...............14
So in fine wrath some golden sounds he won , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 203
Thou pointest out the way, and straight 'tis won . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 96
Thou wast the river - thou wast glory won ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 166
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
Immortal bliss for me too hast thou won . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1024
Thee to thy native hopes. O thou hast won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 17
Who strive therefore: on the sudden it is won . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 532
The short-lived, paly summer is but won On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 5
Won from the gaze of many centuries: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 280
Victory, might be lost, or might be won . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 342
Won by the syren-trumpets, and the ring Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 14
So threw the goddess off, and won his heart Lamia, Part I, Line 336
Of all the glory I have won this day, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 23
For by thy valour have I won this realm, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 8
 
WON'T.............5
There's a blush for won't , and a blush for shan't, O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 5
"My darling Ape, I won't whip you to-day- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 63
I won't speak to his sister or his mother! The Jealousies, Line 156
"Venus won't stir a peg without a fee, The Jealousies, Line 298
"And listen to my words. You say you won't , The Jealousies, Line 460
 
WOND'RING.........1
And springing up, they met the wond'ring sight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 227
 
WOND'ROUS.........5
Of all the secrets of some wond'rous thing Sleep and Poetry, Line 30
The charioteer with wond'rous gesture talks Sleep and Poetry, Line 136
Into some wond'rous region he had gone, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 191
With the noise of fountains wond'rous , Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 7
Who keepeth clos'd a wond'rous riddle-book, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 130
 
WONDER............25
To show this wonder of its gentle might. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 10
Fair as some wonder out of fairy land, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 94
The large-eyed wonder , and ambitious heat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 127
That we must ever wonder how, and whence Sleep and Poetry, Line 70
The silver lamp,- the ravishment,- the wonder - I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 147
Tell but one wonder of thy bridal night! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 210
A wonder , fair as any I have told- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 894
Ready to snort their streams. In this cool wonder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 885
Was seen such wonder underneath the stars. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 727
A blush of coral. Copious wonder -draughts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 843
From some approaching wonder , and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 363
Of tangled wonder , breathless and aghast. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 655
And a giggle at a wonder ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 9
Gazed at such a rugged wonder . Not Aladdin magian, Line 9
I, Coelus, wonder , how they came and whence; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 314
Of such new tuneful wonder . Is't not strange Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 67
I wonder not this stranger's victor-deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 52
Still give me leave to wonder that the Prince Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 2
And left him space for wonder . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 23a
And wonder at her, friends, she is so fair; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 60
And wonder that 'tis so,- the magic chance! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 69
He did; not with cold wonder fearingly, Lamia, Part I, Line 247
They seek no wonder but the human face; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 163
Shall be to thee a wonder ; for the scenes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 244
Free from all pain, if wonder pain thee not." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 248
 
WONDER'D..........8
The breathless Latmian wonder'd o'er and o'er; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 429
Among her kindred, wonder'd that such dower Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 454
And, furthermore, her brethren wonder'd much Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 457
Greatly they wonder'd what the thing might mean: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 460
And he wonder'd There was a naughty boy, Line 114
He wonder'd There was a naughty boy, Line 115
Shoes and he wonder'd - There was a naughty boy, Line 117
And next she wonder'd how his eyes could miss Lamia, Part I, Line 310
 
WONDERED..........1
At which I wondered greatly, knowing well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 556
 
WONDERFUL.........1
'Twas far too strange, and wonderful for sadness; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 219
 
WONDERING.........8
The wondering spirits of heaven were mute, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 31
He wander'd through, oft wondering at such swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 679
Aeaea's isle was wondering at the moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 415
That old nurse stood beside her wondering , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 377
Unseen before by Gods or wondering men, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 183
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 185
Let me no longer be the wondering food Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 111
Around the silken couches, wondering Lamia, Part II, Line 197
 
WONDERMENT........3
On the smooth wind to realms of wonderment ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 142
Through winding alleys; and lo, wonderment ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 384
Home through the gloomy wood in wonderment . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1003
 
WONDERS...........21
Ah! could I tell the wonders of an isle Imitation of Spenser, Line 19
What though while the wonders of nature exploring, To Some Ladies, Line 1
And all the wonders of the mazy range To George Felton Mathew, Line 91
O what wonders had been told Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 2
Many the wonders I this day have seen: To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 1
Would be the wonders of the sky and sea? To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 14
These wonders strange he sees, and many more, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 53
And full of many wonders of the spheres: On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 12
So do these wonders a most dizzy pain, On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
Of nature's lives and wonders puls'd tenfold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 105
And wonders ; struggles to devise some blame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 716
For with wide eye he wonders , and smiles oft. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 63
He saw not fiercer wonders - past the wit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 249
There, when new wonders ceas'd to float before, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 274
Thee safely through these wonders for sweet ends. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 575
Swifter than lightning went these wonders rare; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 621
The ceaseless wonders of this ocean-bed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 392
Of deep-seen wonders motionless,- and blaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 885
Cooler than all the wonders he had seen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1030
Thy spirit in the wonders I shall tell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 862
The many, many wonders see, Apollo to the Graces, Line 10
 
WONDROUS..........7
"What wondrous beauty! From this moment I efface from my mind all Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
That wondrous night: the great Pan-festival: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 897
Through the dark earth, and through the wondrous sea? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 91
O happy spirit-home! O wondrous soul! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 543
Or any other wondrous thing Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 6
That sullen ferment, which for wondrous ends Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 193
A wondrous lesson in thy silent face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 112
 
WONT..............5
As she was wont of old? prepare her steeds, Sleep and Poetry, Line 165
As she was wont , th' imagination Sleep and Poetry, Line 265
Lorenzo, courteously as he was wont , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 189
Then, as was wont , his palace-door flew ope Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 205
Fast by the springs where she to bathe was wont , Lamia, Part I, Line 17
 
WONTED............1
There came before my eyes that wonted thread Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 2
 
WOO...............6
To woo sweet kisses from averted faces,- Sleep and Poetry, Line 106
To woo its own sad image into nearness: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 174
Thy shepherd vest, and woo thee mid fresh leaves. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 700
Or may I woo thee Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 4
To those who woo her with too slavish knees, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 2
Any diviner eloquence,- woo her ears Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
 
WOO'D.............1
Have mov'd, even though Amphion's harp had woo'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 461
 
WOOD..............20
TUNE - "Julia to the Wood Robin" Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Keats's note to Line 1
In noisome alley, and in pathless wood : Addressed to Haydon, Line 4
And now, as deep into the wood as we Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 122
Around the western border of the wood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 542
The earth its dower of river, wood , and vale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 838
Thick, as to curtain up some wood -nymph's home. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 941
For, as the sunset peeps into a wood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 382
Down-looking, vacant, through a hazy wood , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 560
Into the dungeon core of that wild wood : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 565
Home through the gloomy wood in wonderment. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1003
There is Wild Wood , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 13
To-night, upon the skirts of the blind wood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 147
From vale to vale, from wood to wood, he flew, Lamia, Part I, Line 27
From vale to vale, from wood to wood , he flew, Lamia, Part I, Line 27
Of the Wood -Gods, and even the very trees. Lamia, Part I, Line 34
Dash'd by the wood -nymph's beauty, so he burn'd; Lamia, Part I, Line 130
About a young bird's flutter from a wood , Lamia, Part I, Line 180
A censer fed with myrrh and spiced wood , Lamia, Part II, Line 176
Of other crisped spice- wood - then again The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 236
Whom thou saw'st step from yon forlornest wood , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 333
 
WOODBINE..........4
And clumps of woodbine taking the soft wind I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 36
Shading its Ethiop berries; and woodbine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 413
Night-shade with the woodbine kissing; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 14
But every morn of woodbine fresh Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 17
 
WOODCUTTER........1
Of the lone woodcutter ; and listening still, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 51
 
WOODED............1
A wooded cleft, and, far away, the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 75
 
WOODEN............1
Was as wooden There was a naughty boy, Line 110
 
WOODLAND..........8
Of a fresh woodland alley, never ending; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 20
A woodland rivulet - a poet's death. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 14
Making directly for the woodland altar. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 127
O'er many a heath, through many a woodland dun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 72
Art thou now forested? O woodland Queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 305
That woodland Hyacinthus could escape Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 68
Panted, and all his food was woodland air, Character of C.B., Line 17
Known to the woodland nostril, so the words The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 406
 
WOODLANDER........1
With every friend and fellow- woodlander - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 893
 
WOODLARK..........1
Woodlark may sing from sandy fern,- the sun may hear his lay; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 14
 
WOODS.............16
Through its tall woods with high romances blent: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 4
Of nymphs in woods , and fountains; and the shade Sleep and Poetry, Line 67
Through wilderness, and woods of mossed oaks; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 49
Of river sides, and woods , and heathy waste, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 303
Of mine was once made perfect in these woods . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 966
No woods were green enough, no bower divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 151
Peona of the woods !- Can she endure- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 801
Honour to the woods unshorn! Robin Hood, Line 52
Amid the woods they were, so lone and wild, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 5
Those green-rob'd senators of mighty woods , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 73
Went step for step with Thea through the woods , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 202
Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods , Lamia, Part I, Line 2
Into the green-recessed woods they flew; Lamia, Part I, Line 144
Stay! though the greenest woods be thy domain, Lamia, Part I, Line 263
They melted from my sight into the woods : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 459
Goes, step for step, with Thea from yon woods , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 46
 
WOOER.............3
A happy wooer , to the flowery mead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 951
Cheated by shadowy wooer from the clouds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 190
Her playmate, and her wooer in the shade." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 290
 
WOOF..............5
Through a vast antre; then the metal woof , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 230
Were emblem'd in the woof ; with every shape Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 203
The while it did unthread the horrid woof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 292
We know her woof , her texture; she is given Lamia, Part II, Line 232
The woof of darkness, thick, for hid delight; The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 12
 
WOOFED............2
So mus'd awhile, entoil'd in woofed phantasies. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 288
Wool- woofed carpets: fifty wreaths of smoke Lamia, Part II, Line 179
 
WOOING............5
Gave temperate sweets to that well- wooing sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 101
The wooing arms which held me, and did give Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 654
He onward kept; wooing these thoughts to steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 140
With wooing light upon me, ere the morn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
To pamper his slight wooing , warm yet staid: The Jealousies, Line 8
 
WOOL..............4
And black Numidian sheep wool should be wrought, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 63
When they St. Agnes' wool are weaving piously." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 117
Wool -woofed carpets: fifty wreaths of smoke Lamia, Part II, Line 179
Touch'd a spring-lock, and there in wool , or snow The Jealousies, Line 511
 
WOOLLEN...........1
Though the woollen that will keep 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 22
 
WOOLLY............1
And silent was the flock in woolly fold: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 4
 
WOOS..............2
What smoothest air thy smoother forehead woos ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 306
Woos him to hold a duet in a smile, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 44
 
WORD..............27
O breathe a word or two of fire! You say you love; but with a voice, Line 21
Stand anxious: see! behold!" - This clamant word Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 494
Without one impious word , himself he flings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 659
And whisper one sweet word that I may know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 319
No word return'd: both lovelorn, silent, wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 764
And speak not one pale word , and sigh no more. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 808
Turn, damsels! hist! one word I have to say. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 909
And ere he spake a word , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 2
And ere he spake a word , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 6
O Phoebus, that I had thy sacred word Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 30
Where, without any word , from stabs he fell. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 296
Where is another Chaos? Where?"- That word Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 145
Or word , or look, or action of despair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 40
Forlorn! the very word is like a bell Ode to a Nightingale, Line 71
No treason 'gainst his head in deed or word ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
Not a word of greeting, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 93b
Or with one word fever'd you, gentle Prince, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
A word to fright the proudest spirit here!- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 68
Not a word more. Let me embrace my child. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 98
At a word , this: Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 143b
Fair creature, bless me with a single word ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
Why has he time to breathe another word ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
Stay, stay; here is one I have half a word with. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 114
Or gainsaid by one word ; his very motions, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 31
Be your word law; forget to-day- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 165a
And every word she spake entic'd him on Lamia, Part I, Line 326
Marrying to every word a twinborn sigh; Lamia, Part I, Line 341
 
WORDES............1
I leave withouten wordes mo All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 55
 
WORDING...........3
On things for which no wording can be found; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 962
Thus wording timidly among the fierce: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 251
Fine wording , Duke! but words could never yet Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 37
 
WORDS.............55
E'en so the words of love beguile, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 21
While from their master's lips pour forth the inspiring words . Ode to Apollo, Line 29
Whose words are images of thoughts refin'd, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 11
Of words at opening a portfolio. Sleep and Poetry, Line 338
O for three words of honey, that I might I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 209
Smile, as if those words should burn me, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 22
To answer; feeling well that breathed words Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 712
He heard but the last words , nor could contend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 215
Here must we leave thee." - At these words up flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 579
To mellow into words , and then there ran Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 737
Of human words ! roughness of mortal speech! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 818
With syren words - Ah, have I really got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 955
With tears, and smiles, and honey- words she wove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 426
As Pluto's sceptre, that my words not burn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 474
I read these words , and read again, and tried Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 682
Some pleasant words :- but Love will have his day. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 915
To his inward senses these words spake aloud; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1020
When these words reach'd him. Whereupon he bows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 40
Even these words went echoing dismally Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 322
These words awoke the stranger of dark tresses: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 462
And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 303
She hurried at his words , beset with fears, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 352
Leaning with parted lips, some words she spake Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 47
Some mourning words , which in our feeble tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 49
So came these words and went; the while in tears Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 79
So at Hyperion's words the Phantoms pale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 255
Could agonize me more than baby- words Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 314
Your spleens with so few simple words as these? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 321
Could do you better service than mere words ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
Nay, nay, without more words , dost know of him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 67
Fine wording, Duke! but words could never yet Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 37
Whose words once utter'd pass like current gold; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 210
Though, at my words , the hollow prison-vaults Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 257
With hope that gloss of words , or suppliant action, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128
For ever! Speak no more; but hear my words , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 140
In mournful syllables. Let but my words reach Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 15
Despair, or eat thy words ! Why, thou wast nigh Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
And fain would I catch up his dying words , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 42
Her throat was serpent, but the words she spake Lamia, Part I, Line 64
Light flew his earnest words , among the blossoms blown. Lamia, Part I, Line 91
These words dissolv'd: Crete's forests heard no more. Lamia, Part I, Line 170
For so delicious were the words she sung, Lamia, Part I, Line 249
Of sorrows at his words ; at last with pain Lamia, Part II, Line 67
Lycius, perplex'd at words so blind and blank, Lamia, Part II, Line 102
With reconciling words and courteous mien Lamia, Part II, Line 171
With the fine spell of words alone can save The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 9
I had no words to answer; for my tongue, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 228
As near as an immortal's sphered words The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 249
At those few words hung vast before my mind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 307
Leaning, with parted lips, some words she spake The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 349
Some mourning words , which in our feeble tongue The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 351
So came these words , and went; the while in tears The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 378
Known to the woodland nostril, so the words The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 406
His speech, his only words were "yes" and "no," The Jealousies, Line 185
"And listen to my words . You say you won't, The Jealousies, Line 460
 
WORDSWORTH........2
Better than Wordsworth too, I ween, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 31
petty fancies I was crossed." Wordsworth O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
 
WORE..............6
A thousand handicraftsmen wore the mask Sleep and Poetry, Line 200
An old red blanket cloak she wore ; Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 27
This skull-cap wore the cowl from sloth, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 19
Long time this sconce a helmet wore , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 49
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
Upon her crest she wore a wannish fire Lamia, Part I, Line 57
 
WORK..............14
Had brought me a gem from the fret- work of heaven; To Some Ladies, Line 18
This canopy mark: 'tis the work of a fay; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 25
It cannot be that ought will work him harm." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 130
Might seem a work of pain; so not enough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 382
That set sharp racks at work , to pinch and peel. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 120
Work through the clayey soil and gravel hard, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 355
Then 'gan she work again; nor stay'd her care, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 375
Ever such a work began; Not Aladdin magian, Line 2
Destroy'd the work of every fist O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 15
So keep your wits at work , for your own sake, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
He sets his bustling household's wits at work King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 48
from Bayle's Dictionary, and had copied a long Latin note from that work . The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
"Sire, this is Bertha Pearl's neat handy- work , The Jealousies, Line 442
Her work -box, and 'twill help your purpose dearly; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
WORKETH...........1
Worketh he, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 7
 
WORKING...........3
Working within him into something dreary,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 634
And eyes at horrid working . Nearest him Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 52
With the wreath'd trellis of a working brain, Ode to Psyche, Line 60
 
WORKINGS..........3
Haply it was the workings of its pride, Imitation of Spenser, Line 34
Of mighty workings ? - Addressed to the Same, Line 13
Now while the silent workings of the dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 107
 
WORKS.............2
Of thee, and of thy works , and of thy life; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 27
It works a constant change, which happy death The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 259
 
WORLD.............76
Above the ingrate world and human fears. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 12
Thrown by the pitiless world . We next could tell To George Felton Mathew, Line 65
Which seem'd full loath this happy world to leave: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 4
And half forget what world or worldling meant. Happy is England! I could be content, Line 8
Be lull'd with songs of mine. Fair world , adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
These, these will give the world another heart, Addressed to the Same, Line 11
Then the events of this wide world I'd seize Sleep and Poetry, Line 81
Till in the bosom of a leafy world Sleep and Poetry, Line 119
Of the goaded world ; and Kosciusko's worn Sleep and Poetry, Line 387
Tell him, I have you in my world of blisses: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 54
Of this fair world , and all its gentle livers; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 117
So that we feel uplifted from the world , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 139
Shapes from the invisible world , unearthly singing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 186
A trampling down of what the world most prizes, On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 11
Then is there nothing in the world so fair? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 9
With the green world they live in; and clear rills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 16
A world of other unguess'd offices. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 370
And moonlight; aye, to all the mazy world Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 460
Heave his broad shoulder o'er the edge of the world , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 530
Of all the congregated world , to fan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 818
The world with benefits unknowingly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 827
How beautiful thou art! The world how deep! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 188
Into the sparry hollows of the world ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 204
The world has done its duty. Yet, oh yet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 728
A moon-beam to the deep, deep water- world , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 101
With rapture to the other side of the world ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 250
Is, in this restless world , for me reserv'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 715
I sat a weeping: in the whole world wide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 183
But now of all the world I love thee best. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 284
This is this world - sweet dewy blossom!"- Woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 320
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 13
Nurse of swart nations since the world began, To the Nile, Line 5
In the dark void of night. For in the world Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 71
Beyond the sweet and bitter world - beyond it unaware; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 30
But in the world of thought and mental might. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 14
Beyond this world , this mortal time O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 63
Fools! if some passions high have warm'd the world , And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 11
Beauty before the wide world never knew- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
The dragon- world of all its hundred eyes; As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 5
She was a Goddess of the infant world ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 26
Another world , another universe, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 143
I see them, on the mortal world beneath, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 334
Mnemosyne was straying in the world ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 29
Which, when it ceases in this mountain'd world , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 123
Unhinges the poor world ;- not in that strife, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 147
Not world on world upon these shoulders piled, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 313
Not world on world upon these shoulders piled, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 313
Why then should man, teasing the world for grace, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 13
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 19
O kings and princes of this fevrous world , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 100
To set the silly sort o' the world agape, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
Is frankness, and a true tongue to the world ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 176
Driven me to the very edge o' the world , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 52
Or, for such trifles, rob th' adorned world Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 88
Then the damn'd crime of blurting to the world Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 25
The world is all agape to see dragg'd forth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 68
A wide world , where a thousand new-born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
I leave you to the desert of the world Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 230
Of all the world to trust in. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 253a
The whole world chaff to me. Your doom is fixed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
Darkness steal out upon the sleepy world Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 30
My wrath against thee for the orbed world . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
A long life in the foulest sink o' the world ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 13
That the extremest beauty of the world Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 93
Ah, what a world of love was at her feet! Lamia, Part I, Line 21
Shut from the busy world of more incredulous. Lamia, Part I, Line 397
Into the noisy world almost forsworn. Lamia, Part II, Line 33
And, pledging all the mortals of the world , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 44
"But those to whom the miseries of the world The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 148
All else who find a haven in the world , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 150
"Are there not thousands in the world ," said I, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 154
Who feel the giant agony of the world ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 157
To the great world ? Thou art a dreaming thing; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 168
The one pours out a balm upon the world , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 201
Backbiting all the world in ev'ry page; The Jealousies, Line 95
But how in the world can I contrive to stun The Jealousies, Line 158
 
WORLD'S...........8
A hand that from the world's bleak promontory Calidore: A Fragment, Line 107
What are this world's true joys,- ere the great voice, To My Brothers, Line 13
My thirst for the world's praises: nothing base, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 770
My pilgrimage for the world's dusky brink. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 977
And the world's gaudy ensigns see in shreds. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 12
Of the world's herbal, this fair lily blanch'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
She is the world's chief jewel, and, by heaven, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 73
Those melodies sung into the world's ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 188
 
WORLDLINESS.......1
Chacing away all worldliness and folly; Sleep and Poetry, Line 26
 
WORLDLING.........1
And half forget what world or worldling meant. Happy is England! I could be content, Line 8
 
WORLDLY...........5
And look, quite dead to every worldly thing! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 292
To be fill'd with worldly fear. God of the meridian, Line 8
Forgotten is the worldly heart - alone, it beats in vain. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 24
Take farewell too of worldly vanities. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 173
'Tis not for worldly pomp I wish to see King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 19
 
WORLDS............1
And now it tells me, that in worlds unknown, To Kosciusko, Line 5
 
WORM..............8
Or was I a worm too low-creeping for death, God of the golden bow, Line 11
O why didst thou pity and beg for a worm ? God of the golden bow, Line 20
To give the glow- worm light? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 155
Ravening a worm .- Away ye horrid moods, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 105
Of witch, and demon, and large coffin- worm , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 374
Or Vesper, amorous glow- worm of the sky; Ode to Psyche, Line 27
Even as the worm doth feed upon the nut, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 158
And supersedeth quite the use of the glow- worm . The Jealousies, Line 216
 
WORMS.............2
Darkness, and worms , and shrouds, and sepulchres Sleep and Poetry, Line 243
Glow- worms began to trim their starry lamps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 141
 
WORMY.............1
Ah! wherefore all this wormy circumstance? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 385
 
WORN..............8
From the worn top of some old battlement Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 15
Of the goaded world; and Kosciusko's worn Sleep and Poetry, Line 387
Counting his woe- worn minutes, by the strokes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 50
Before that care- worn sage, who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
Through dangerous winds, had by my footsteps worn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 616
Such men to honor thee, who, worn with toil, To the Nile, Line 7
Concerning what will make that sin- worn cheek Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
Tired out, and weary- worn with contumelies. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 116
 
WORRIED...........1
Where liv'd the youth, who worried and annoy'd The Jealousies, Line 115
 
WORSE.............5
Worse than a housewife's, when she thinks her cream Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 3
Worse than the torment's self: but rather tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 177
To save thee from a worse . All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 28
Too heavy a sigh would kill him, or do worse . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 19
That fellow's voice, which plagues me worse than any, The Jealousies, Line 159
 
WORSHIP...........4
Of their star in the east and gone to worship them. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
That I may worship them? No eyelids meet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 48
Rich in the simple worship of a day. Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 14
That he might gaze and worship all unseen; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 80
 
WORSHIPERS........1
Of all mock lyrists, large self worshipers , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 207
 
WORST.............3
I thought the worst was simple misery; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 330
The sword has done its worst ; not without worst Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 5
The sword has done its worst; not without worst Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 5
 
WORTH.............8
But these comparisons are nothing worth . To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 8
Your sceptre worth a straw, your cushions old door mats." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
All its more ponderous and bulky worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 803
Nought earthly worth my compassing; so stand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 162
That things of delicate and tenderest worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 367
Matters not worth remembering, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 89
See scraps of mine will make it worth your while, The Jealousies, Line 562
Which calls them Highland pebble-stones not worth a fly. The Jealousies, Line 747
 
WORTHLESS.........1
And sauces held he worthless as the chaff; Character of C.B., Line 12
 
WORTHY............4
They be of what is worthy , - though not drest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 21
For what there may be worthy in these rhymes Sleep and Poetry, Line 349
A sentence something worthy of his guilt. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 21
If you hold Bertha as a worthy prize. The Jealousies, Line 499
 
WOULDN'T..........2
O who wouldn't hie to Dawlish fair, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 17
O who wouldn't stop in a meadow? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 18
 
WOULDST...........9
Tell me what thou wouldst have been? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 43
That thou wouldst spout a little streamlet o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 718
Full well I feel thou wouldst not leave me. Still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 751
So thou wouldst thus, for many sequent hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 797
Thou wouldst bathe once again. Innocent maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 978
O thou wouldst joy to live in such a place; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 675
What wouldst thou ere we all are laid on bier?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 973
Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 59
What wouldst say? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 115c
 
WOUND.............9
Until his heart is well nigh over wound , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 8
Heal'd up the wound , and, with a balmy power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 483
With power to dream deliciously; so wound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 708
From where large Hercules wound up his story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 406
I am wound up in deep astonishment! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117
For, in the healing of one wound , I fear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149
The tight- wound energies of his despair, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 26
And wound with many a river to its head, Lamia, Part I, Line 29
And, in its marriage robe, the heavy body wound . Lamia, Part II, Line 311
 
WOUNDED...........2
That pains my wounded ear. Lines Written on 29 May, Line 6
Enter ALBERT ( wounded ). Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
 
WOUNDS............2
But a fierce demon 'nointed safe from wounds King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 32
" Wounds ! how they shout!" said Hum, "and there,- see, see, The Jealousies, Line 550
 
WOVE..............4
With tears, and smiles, and honey-words she wove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 426
She wove and she would sing. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 20
And with the larger wove in small intricacies. Lamia, Part II, Line 141
Which needs had been of dyed asbestus wove , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 74
 
WOVEN.............11
Which round its marge reflected woven bowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 8
Where woven boughs shut out the moon's bright ray, To Hope, Line 8
And garlands woven of flowers wild, and sweet, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 155
A little space, with boughs all woven round; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 166
Apollo's very leaves - woven to bless To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 7
In woven baskets bringing ears of corn, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 6
In through the woven roof, and fluttering-wise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 426
Was woven in with black distinctness; storm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 200
A cloth of woven crimson, gold, and jet:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 256
I shall believe in wizard- woven loves Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
His woven periods into careless rhyme; The Jealousies, Line 636
 
WOX...............2
Pale wox I, and in vapours hid my face. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 326
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim. In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
WRANGLE...........1
In coil and wrangle . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 48
 
WRAPP'D...........4
A cloak of blue wrapp'd up his aged bones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 197
She wrapp'd it up; and for its tomb did choose Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 413
His mind wrapp'd like his mantle, while her eyes Lamia, Part I, Line 242
With hasty steps, wrapp'd cloak, and solemn looks, The Jealousies, Line 219
 
WRAPPING..........1
Wrapping all objects from my smothered sight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 901
 
WRAPPIT...........1
I saw her wrappit in her hood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 25
 
WRAPS.............1
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
 
WRATH.............19
And his dark brow for very wrath is knit? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 26
So in fine wrath some golden sounds he won, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 203
For wrath became stiffened; the sound God of the golden bow, Line 16
By things I tremble at, and gorgon wrath . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 754
And hoping heaven's dread wrath to shun, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 77
He enter'd, but he enter'd full of wrath ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 213
Now I behold in you fear, hope, and wrath ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 332
Where, finding sulphur, a quadruple wrath Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 146
How we can war, how engine our great wrath ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 161
"O ye, whom wrath consumes! who, passion-stung, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 173
Of huge Enceladus swallow'd it in wrath : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 304
The edge of his sharp wrath to eager kindness. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 55
Pour'd out a phial of wrath upon my faults? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 50
Be not so rash; wait till his wrath shall pass, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 105
My wrath against thee for the orbed world. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
Your wrath , weak boy? Tremble at mine, unless Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Into some cranny to escape my wrath ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
He is so full of grief and passionate wrath ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 18
Upon the altar of wrath ! She stings me through!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 157
 
WRATHFUL..........1
A wrathful dew. O folly! why did I Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 222
 
WREATH............14
A sun-beamy tale of a wreath , and a chain; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 22
And list to the tale of the wreath , and the chain, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 39
To see the laurel wreath , on high suspended, Sleep and Poetry, Line 35
Flit onward - now a lovely wreath of girls Sleep and Poetry, Line 149
More lovely than a wreath from the bay tree? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 2
When like a blank ideot I put on thy wreath - God of the golden bow, Line 8
His aged head, crowned with beechen wreath , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 159
Before the vine- wreath crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 258
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 12
Pain had no sting, and pleasure's wreath no flower. Ode on Indolence, Line 18
For every crime I have a laurel- wreath , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 3
Thou beauteous wreath , with melancholy eyes, Lamia, Part I, Line 84
What wreath for Lamia? What for Lycius? Lamia, Part II, Line 221
Though swimming through the dance's dangerous wreath , To Fanny, Line 27
 
WREATH'D..........5
Walking upon the white clouds wreath'd and curl'd. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 140
Came swelling forth where little caves were wreath'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 665
With the wreath'd trellis of a working brain, Ode to Psyche, Line 60
His turban wreath'd of gold, and white, and green, The Jealousies, Line 278
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth. The Jealousies, Line 729
 
WREATHED..........8
Rich benedictions o'er us; ye have wreathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 222
No wreathed incense do we see upborne To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 3
For their sweet queen: when lo! the wreathed green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 516
Of all its wreathed pearls her hair she frees; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 227
Of wreathed silver: sumptuous they stand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 273
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
"When from this wreathed tomb shall I awake! Lamia, Part I, Line 38
Before its wreathed doorway, on a mound The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 28
 
WREATHER..........1
Wreather of poppy buds, and weeping willows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 14
 
WREATHING.........1
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 6
 
WREATHS...........7
Upholding wreaths of ivy; the white dove, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 43
Through tendril wreaths fantastically creeping. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 170
And flowers, and wreaths , and ready myrtle crowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 342
Also, when he would taste the spicy wreaths Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 186
Wool-woofed carpets: fifty wreaths of smoke Lamia, Part II, Line 179
The myrtle sicken'd in a thousand wreaths . Lamia, Part II, Line 264
Flush angerly: when he would taste the wreaths The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 30
 
WRECK.............3
Stood trembling creatures. I beheld the wreck ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 658
Amid the wreck of thousands I am whole; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
I should have perish'd in our empire's wreck ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
 
WRECK'D...........3
Morning fair and storm- wreck'd hull; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 13
O wretched woman! lost, wreck'd , swallow'd up, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
Where they were wreck'd and live a wretched life; What can I do to drive away, Line 33
 
WRECKS............1
To fret at myriads of earthly wrecks . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 776
 
WREN..............3
Down in the blue-bells, or a wren light rustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 451
Where pleasure may be sent: the nested wren Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 63
Wren or eagle, finds his way to Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 9
 
WRENCH'D..........1
Wrench'd with an iron hand from firm array, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 5
 
WRESTLE...........1
Temper'd with coolness. How they ever wrestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 75
 
WRESTLING.........1
And where the bee with cowslip bells was wrestling . To George Felton Mathew, Line 50
 
WRETCH............8
O what a wretch is he! and when 'tis his, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 144
Dismay'd; and, like a wretch from whom the rack Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 256
"In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 689
If I sleep not, I am a waking wretch . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 97
Remorseless Albert! Cruel, cruel wretch ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 177
Will you? Ah, wretch , thou canst not, for I have Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 58
Turn them aside, wretch ! or the righteous ban Lamia, Part II, Line 278
Corinthians! look upon that gray-beard wretch ! Lamia, Part II, Line 287
 
WRETCH'S..........2
Gush'd with more pride than do a wretch's tears?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 122
On the right shoulders; on that wretch's head Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 144
 
WRETCHED..........12
When thou art dead, and all thy wretched crew? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 14
To musty laws lined out with wretched rule Sleep and Poetry, Line 195
Yes: now I am no longer wretched thrall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 333
He leant, wretched . He surely cannot now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 86
My china closet too - with wretched nerves Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 14
To boot - say, wretched ingrate, have I not Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 15
O, wretched dolt! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 196b
Wretched impediment! evil genius! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 12
O wretched woman! lost, wreck'd, swallow'd up, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 77
Or living on perhaps, your wretched thrall, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 11
Where they were wreck'd and live a wretched life; What can I do to drive away, Line 33
Dare keep its wretched home: To Fanny, Line 45
 
WRETCHES..........1
Poor self-deceived wretches , who must think Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 76
 
WRING.............1
Wring hands; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
 
WRINKLED..........2
From his old teacher's wrinkled countenance, Lamia, Part II, Line 244
Whose carved features wrinkled as he fell, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 225
 
WRINKLES..........3
Furrow'd deep wrinkles in his forehead large, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 223
No wrinkles , where all vices nestle in Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 83
Shaded his deep green eyes, and wrinkles brown The Jealousies, Line 507
 
WRINKLING.........1
Of Saturn; tell me, if this wrinkling brow, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 100
 
WRIST.............2
O let me for one moment touch her wrist ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 103
In the cold moonshine. Straight he seiz'd her wrist ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 508
 
WRISTS............4
Upheld on ivory wrists , or sporting feet: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 156
Rubbing their sleepy eyes with lazy wrists , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 508
And each one's gentle wrists , with reverence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 743
Nay, look not down, nor lick thy dainty wrists - To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 9
 
WRIT..............1
Writ in the tongue of heaven, by those souls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 130
 
WRITE.............9
E'en now, dear George, while this for you I write , To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 9
" Write ! thou wilt never have a better day." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 100
Trust to my feelings, and write you a letter. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 104
Let me write down a line of glorious tone, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 11
Write on my tablets all that was permitted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 79
For what has made the sage or poet write I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 125
Many and many a verse I hope to write , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 49
But meeting her blue orbs! Who, who can write Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 531
Let me see, and let me write Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 26
 
WRITES............1
All that he writes with such a hurrying glow. Sleep and Poetry, Line 154
 
WRITH'D...........2
Writh'd not of passed joy? In drear nighted December, Line 20
She writh'd about, convuls'd with scarlet pain: Lamia, Part I, Line 154
 
WRITHE............1
Writhe at defeat, and nurse your agonies! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 174
 
WRITHEN...........1
For the whole herd, as by a whirlwind writhen , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 529
 
WRITHES...........1
That writhes about the roots of Sicily: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 244
 
WRITHING..........2
Writhing with pity, and a cursing fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 664
Writhing her little body with ennui, The Jealousies, Line 74
 
WRITITH...........2
-"Als writith he of swevenis The Eve of St. Mark, Line 99
He writith ; and thinges many mo: The Eve of St. Mark, Line 109
 
WRITTEN...........6
On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 21
And so I did. When many lines I'd written , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 101
written with the least atom of purpose to forestall criticisms of course, but Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Written in star-light on the dark above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1021
Written in small crow-quill size The Eve of St. Mark, Line 96
Written by Crafticant, and published The Jealousies, Line 87
 
WRONG.............11
Its sweets in the wrong sense.- Thou dost eclipse Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 12
I would not Albert suffer any wrong . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110
Can smother from myself the wrong I've done him,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 156
Gersa, I think you wrong me: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107b
Thou art wrong ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 181b
He hath wrong'd me, and I have done him wrong ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 58
Do not wrong me, Prince. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 12b
But then to wrong the generous Emperor Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 28
You do yourself much wrong . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 196a
Of younger friends; yet must I do this wrong , Lamia, Part II, Line 168
And great unerring Nature once seems wrong . What can I do to drive away, Line 43
 
WRONG'D...........4
The wrong'd Libertas,- who has told you stories To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 44
Had he then wrong'd a heart where sorrow kept? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 284
Am I not cruelly wrong'd ? Believe, believe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 748
He hath wrong'd me, and I have done him wrong; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 58
 
WRONGS............2
And pitying forsooth my many wrongs ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 75
For I am sick and faint with many wrongs , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 115
 
WROTE.............1
And wrote There was a naughty boy, Line 45
 
WROTH.............2
Now tiger-passion'd, lion-thoughted, wroth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 68
Wroth as himself. He look'd upon them all, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 351
 
WROUGHT...........10
His armour was so dexterously wrought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 116
Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 11
Their voices to the clouds, a fair wrought car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 165
Wrought suddenly in me. What indeed more strange? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 521
That but one night had wrought this flowery spell; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 557
Collecting, mimick'd the wrought oaken beams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 623
And black Numidian sheep wool should be wrought , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 63
Glow'd through, and wrought upon the muffling dark Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 275
Had wrought upon ye; and how I might best Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 241
And wrought by spumy bitumen Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 16
 
WRUNG.............4
I have no daedale heart: why is it wrung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 459
O Goddess! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung Ode to Psyche, Line 1
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 221
Beseeching him, the while his hand she wrung , Lamia, Part II, Line 68

Published @ RC

March 2005