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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 3, NUMBER 5 (February 1810)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 31 Mar. 1810 [Murray MS., accounts book; NLS MS. 3879 (f.50); Courier advertisement 26 March, announcing the journal for 31March]

  • Murray printed 5000 copies

  • This Number initially sold 3487. By July 1810 Murray still had on hand 1513 copies, and by November 1811, 700 copies, having lost by that date £119 on the issue

  • This Number cost £876 in total, including £119 for printing, £324 for paper, £2 for wrappers, £2 for new wrappers to correct the price, £72 for stitching, £12 for corrections, £1 for cancelled article (12 pages), £3 for night work and Sunday work, £30 for advertising, £10 for books, postage, carriage, £171 for articles plus £31.10 for article 18 and £50 for the editor plus a £25 bonus for the editor [Murray MS, accounts book]

  • In April, Walter Scott convinced William Gifford not to change the name of the review. Gifford thought the name lacked character

  • The portraitist, John Hoppner, one of Gifford's closest friends and an early contributor, died 23 Jan. 1810, leaving Gifford for a time unable to work and throwing the journal's publication seriously behind schedule

  • Items for 1810 from Jack Lynch's literary resources page, with additions:

    • Napoleon, at the peak of his power, annexes Holland, suppressing all Dutch commerce with Britain and the Americas. Louis Bonaparte, King of Holland and the Emperor's brother, abdicates his throne in protest. Napoleon marries the Archduchess Marie Louis of Austria. He goes on to annex German lands.
    • Economic recession deepens across Europe. Napoleon issues the Decrees of Rombouillet and Fontainbleu, confiscating American and British goods, respectively.
    • Fractious negotiations between Britain and President Madison fail to lift the American embargo.
    • George III increasingly incapacitated by mental and physical illness.
    • Primitive Methodist church established.
    • Scott's Lady of the Lake published (see QR #101); Crabbe's The Borough published (see QR #115).

     

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #67, 71, 75, 78, 81, and particularly 84 (Southey's article on Nelson)

  • Evidence is supplied below that establishes Sir Walter Scott as the probable author of #71 and Robert Grant as the author of an important article on the Bullion Question, #78

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 13

  • Number of probable attributions for this issue: 4

  • Number of articles for which no suggestion of authorship is made: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


67 Article 1. Herculanensia; or Archaeological and Philological Dissertations: containing a Manuscript found among the Ruins of Herculaneum; and dedicated, by Permission, to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, 1-20. Author: Thomas Young.

Running Title: Herculanensia.

Notes: In attributing the article to Young, Shine cites JM III's Register; Brande XXVIII 157; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138; Young 230-38; and Pettigrew IV 21. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 13 Feb. 1810 [16 Feb. postmark]: 'Dr Young has set up a page of curious Greek with Fry's types, which he wishes to have inserted in his Article.'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article appears in Young's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. Devon MS. 1149M (f.78), WG to Edward Copleston, 21 Apr. 1810: mentions Young's article on Herculanensia. BL MS. 28099 (f.69), WG to George Ellis, 12 Feb. [1810], says Young's article in this Number is 'above all praise.' Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 2 Feb. 1810, says he has returned to WG 'the excellent article on the Herculanean manuscript'. George D'Oyly told Blomfield about the article, who hurried a note to Jeffrey to stop a similar article from appearing in the Edinburgh Review. 'If his letter arrives in time, we have lost a triumph.' NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: 'In Herculanensia I have no doubt that we surpass any thing the Edin. Rev. can do.' NLS MS. 3879 (f.74), WG to Scott, 9 May 1810: 'Sir Wm [Drummond] ... is highly gratified with the review of Herculanensia, and has offered his services—this, of course is not for the profane.—I know not what kind of works to send him.—pious m.s. you say!!! O shocking! I thought you had more gravity.' Drummond was notorious among Christians for his forthright atheism; his anti-religious polemics in the Edinburgh Review gave that journal a reputation for impiety and thus indirectly contributed to the founding of the QR. It is notable that he would consider contributing to the QR.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #525, Aug. 1810, by C. J. Blomfield.

Concerning the modern effort to unroll the manuscripts, follow this link http://magazine.byu.edu/article.tpl?num=44-Spr01

JM II's marked QR: 'Dr Young'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Young, but without evidence.


68 Article 2. Dentrecasteaux, Voyage de Dentrecasteaux, envoyé à la Recherche de la Pérouse, publié par Ordre de Sa Majesté l'Empereur et Roi, sous le Ministère de S. E. le Vice-Amiral Decrès, Comte de l'Empire, 21-43. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Dentrecasteaux—Voyage à la Recherche de la Pérouse.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register; Barrow 501-2; Smiles I 166; and Warter III 11-12.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. In the article, Barrow doubts the existence of cannibals (p.38) a conviction he repeats in other articles. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 6 Mar. 1810: says he has only the first part of 'Dentrecasteaux.' Author has access to Admiralty documents (pp. 23-24). Barrow was Second Secretary at the Admiralty.

JM II's marked QR: 'Sir J Barrow'.

JM III's Register attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


69 Article 3. Boothby, Fables and Satires, with a Preface on the Æsopean Fable, 43-50. Author: Frank Sayers.

Running Title: Sir Brooke Boothby's Fables and Satires.

Notes: In attributing the article to Sayers, Shine cites JM III's Register (that queries its attribution to Sayers). Shine also cites Graham 41 [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: Graham, too, relies solely on JM III's Register. The evidence in Shine is therefore not definitive].

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr Sayers, Norwich' on 30 Dec. 1809.

JM III's Register: [in pencil] '? Dr Sayer (Norwich)'


70 Article 4. D'Ivernois, Effets du Blocus continental sur le Commerce, les Finances, le Credit, et la Prospéritédes Isles Britanniques. Seconde Edition, 50-63. Author: George Ellis.

Running Title: Sir Francis D'Ivernois—Effets du Blocus.

Notes: In attributing the article to Ellis, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM [?Feb. 1810]: 'I have this instant heard from G E .... A short article on D'Ivernois (about 6 or 7 pages) will be sent in a day or two.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. George Ellis refused to condense this article and agreed to put it off to this Number. Murray MS., Ellis to JM, [Oct. or Nov. 1809], is sending a brief article on 'Blocus Continental'. NLS MS. 3879 (f.60), WG to Scott, 30 Apr. 1810: 'In the last Number he [George Ellis] had three articles, all excellent.' BL MS. 28099 (f.69), WG to Ellis: 'How is it possible to fail with three of them [i.e., articles by Ellis] in the same No.?' See also #72 and 75.

JM II's marked QR: 'G. Ellis'.

JM III's Register attribution to Ellis, but without evidence.


71 Article 5. Holford, Wallace: or, the Flight of Falkirk. A Metrical Romance, 63-69. Author: Walter Scott, probably, and with Richard Heber.

Running Title: Wallace: or, the Flight of Falkirk.

Notes: In attributing the article to Reginald Heber alone, Shine cites JM III's Register (that queries its suggestion to 'Scott or Heber'). Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, 2 Feb. 1810: 'I have detained Wallace, because I expect Mr. Gray to send for it at the request of Mr. [Richard] Heber.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [?Feb. 1810]: '<H>[olford] is finished, but I ... want to look it over narrowly—it will make 6 or 7 pages—which are perhaps too many. The proofs, I sent to Mr Heber by his desire .... I will take care of the last leaf of which perhaps your suspicions are right.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: in quoting these letters, Shine incorrectly assumes that 'Mr. Heber' refers to Reginald Heber, a sometime contributor to the QR. The reference is instead to Reginald's brother Richard, a close friend of Walter Scott's who at this time frequently acted as WG's sub-editor of Scott's reviews for the QR. See the discussion that follows.]

Some of the following evidence and information was first published in VPR 28; some is published here for the first time. A combination of evidence—including the article's content, the material cited by Shine, and the evidence of the following letters and those quoted at entry #87—suggests that Scott is the author of article #71 and that Richard Heber looked over the proofs. For the sake of clarity, the Shines' evidence quoted above is repeated here. NLS MS. 3878 (f.236), WG to Walter Scott, 30 Dec. 1809: 'Murray says he has sent you Wallace—and he has done well. Not that Wallace is worthy of your pains, for the story is poorly told, and the battle not quite as well fought as the one which I have "heard"... is to be found in a long poem called Marmion ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, 2 Feb. 1810: 'I have detained Wallace, because I expect Mr. Gray to send for it at the request of Mr. [Richard] Heber.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [? 1810]: 'The conclusion of Wallace I had condemned before your letter came.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [tentatively dated in Shine as Feb. 1810]: '<H>[olford] is finished, but I ... want to look it over narrowly—it will make 6 or 7 pages—which are perhaps too many. The proofs, I sent to Mr Heber by his desire .... I will take care of the last leaf of which perhaps your suspicions are right.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Mar. 1810], says Scott's article has arrived and 'it is an Ironical imitation of Dr Johnson.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [17 Mar. 1810]: 'The packet from Scott is this instant arrived—but I do not see how we can insert it, as I think we are full. However we will talk it over—I have not yet opened it.' (This letter is quoted by Shine at entry #90.) Murray MS., WG to JM, [17 Mar. 1810]: 'Mr Heber, who called here this evening, thinks Scott's Article should if possible appear on account of his name. If you are of the same opinion, let me know, and I will prepare it.' BL MS. 28099 (f.72), WG to Ellis, 6 Apr. 1810: 'O that Scott! He sent me two hurried articles, just as the Rev. [Number 5] was printed.'

To summarize the above evidence: In December 1809, JM sent Scott a review copy of Wallace. (If only because of the cost, JM usually sent books for review by prior arrangement.) By early February WG had in hand a review of Wallace. On the advice of Richard Heber, he sent the review to a Mr. Gray. The only person by that name known to be associated Quarterly Review was Sir Charles Edward Grey, though at a later date (see, for example, #516). There is chance this is instead a clever pseudonym for Scott, alluding to Scott's 'The Gray Brother'. The 'ironical imitation of Johnson' is announced as if it were a production WG has seen for the first time and is therefore evidence against #71 being by Scott. And yet, the next articles published in the QR that are known to be by Scott, #87 and 100, cannot be described as 'ironical imitations of Johnson' whereas, arguably, article #71 does match that description. The article's first pages employ the hallmarks of Augustan prose, balanced, epigrammatic phrases, and there are references to correct models and modes of imitation. The author playfully cautions against imitating living authors (if it is Scott, because the living author may review his imitator's work). The reviewer ironically criticizes Holford's Falkirk for its successful imitation of aspects of Scott's Marmion in which critics had found fault ('Mr. Scott was accused of overstepping the bounds of probability in making De Wilton escape detection ... in consequence of his wearing a Palmer's dress .... The author of Wallace has however proceeded much further ....' p. 65). The letter of 17 March announcing the arrival of what is apparently a second article may refer to #87. The letter of 6 April 1810 clearly demonstrates that by March 1810 WG had in hand two articles by Scott.

Richard Heber's role in the early years of the journal has seldom been commented on in the scholarship. He recruited a number of important contributors, including his brother, Reginald, and Robert Grant, Reginald's friend. Moreover, Richard Heber was a close friend to Walter Scott and George Canning. Famously, Heber was present at the October 1809 meeting at Ashestiel with Scott, Murray, and Ballantyne where the subject was broached of establishing a Tory journal to rival the Edinburgh Review. It was often at Heber's prodding that Scott produced material for the QR. For the present article, as with others by Scott, Heber acted as Scott's conscience, determining if the piece was sufficiently up to standard. Heber is identified in the Shine volume as Reginald, Richard Heber's younger brother, probably because Reginald was a frequent contributor while Richard never wrote for the QR. However, it was Richard, not Reginald, who was a member of the journal's editorial coterie and the former frequently, the latter seldom, offered his opinion on articles or had it solicited by WG.

[Bookseller's note: 'A poem on the Scottish hero Sir William Wallace (1272?-1305), written in five cantos and describes Wallace's heroism at the Battle of Falkirk (1298) and how he was betrayed by his fellow countryman Sir John de Menteith (the Sheriff of Dumbarton).']

JM III's Register: [in pencil] '? Scott or Heber'.


72 Article 6. Leroy de Flagis, Etat Politique, Civil, et Militaire de l'Empire de Russie; suivi de Lettres sur le Gouvernement, les Mœurs, le Commerce, les Colonies et les Etablissements Académiques de la Russie, 69-89. Author: George Ellis.

Running Title: J. B. Leroy de Flagis—Etat de Russie.

Notes: In attributing the article to Ellis, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [?1810]: 'Russia is most admirable, and I see nothing that can be altered.'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Geo. Ellis Esqr' on 10 June 1809. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 2 Feb. 1810, says his article on Russia 'is in forwardness'. NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: says in the next Number '... there is also one on Russia, drawn up with all the playful elegance and satire of George.—it is indeed an admirable piece of writing.' See also evidence at #70 and 75.

JM III's Register: attribution to Ellis citing Cooke's memorandum book.


73 Article 7. Peyrard, Œuvres d'Archimède, traduites, littéralement, avec un Commentaire. Dédié à sa Majesté l'Empereur et Roe. Seconde edit., 89-110. Author: Olinthus Gregory, probably.

Running Title: Peyrard—Œuvres d'Archimède

Notes: In attributing the article to Thomas Young, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 13 Mar. 1810 [notation on letter in JM II's hand: 'In answer to my solicitation to leave out a Note reflecting on Playfair in an Article on Archimedes ....'] 'The 1st proof is not yet returned from Woolwich ....' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: in attributing the article to Young, JM III appears to have been confused by Young's having had a hand in articles #103 and 186. Young was, however, sub-editor of these articles, not, as JM III thought, their primary author. JM III may also have been confused by a reference to Young and Playfair in Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 23 June 1809, concerning which see #43.]

The following evidence and discussion was first published in VPR 28. JM insisted that Gregory drop from the article a criticism of Playfair. WG expressed his pleasure at the appearance of this article. He had an interest in the subject, as he was himself known as a competent mathematician. The Edinburgh Review—one of whose pillars was Henry Brougham, who had made an impression at the university as a mathematician—had published some notable articles on mathematics. WG was happy to engage the 'Northern Blast' on this additional front. Young lived in London, on Welbeck Street, whereas the article's author was at Woolwich, as indicated in Murray MS., WG to JM, 13 Mar. 1810, quoted above. Gregory was mathematical master at Woolwich Academy from 1802. He succeeded the eminent Charles Hutton as professor of mathematics there and served in the period 1807-38. Article #73 is not on Young's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. This evidence, taken together, indicates that Young's role in the article was, at best, a subordinate one and that the article originated at Woolwich. Gregory is specifically identified in Murray MS., Books Loaned Register, 8 Nov. 1811: a book reviewed at #186 was sent to 'Dr O. Gregory, Woolwich'. NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: 'We have ventured on Mathematics ^too you see, & I hope not ingloriously. There the E[dinburgh] R[eview] fancied themselves perfectly secure.' See also evidence at #103 and #186.

JM III's Register: attribution to Thomas Young, but without evidence.


74 Article 8. Churton, The Life of Alexander Nowell, Dean of St. Paul's, chiefly compiled from Registers, Letters, and other authentic Evidences, 111-14. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker, probably.

Running Title: Churton's Life of Dean Nowell.

Notes: In attributing the article to Whitaker, Shine cites only Nicholls xxix. Nicholls, however, is sometimes unreliable. In suggesting Walter Scott as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register and quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [March 1810, Numbered 76]: 'Scott's Article reached me this morning—it is an ironical imitation of Dr. Johnson.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the reference in the quoted letter is probably to #71 or 90.]

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Devon MS. (f.114), WG to Edward Copleston, 9 Feb. 1810, says he has heard from Whitaker for the first time. See also evidence at #53.

JM III's Register: 'W Scott??' and note: 'See W G's letter No 76'.


75 Article 9. Duigenan, The Nature and Extent of the Demands of the Irish Roman Catholics fully explained, in Observations and Strictures, &c.; Letter from the Right Hon. Lord Grenville to the Earl of Fingall, 114-29. Author: George Ellis, with George Canning.

Running Title: Ld. Grenville & Dr. Duigenan on Catholic Claims.

Notes: In attributing the article to Canning and Ellis (in that order), Shine cites JM III's Register and Marriot 146. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, 8 Feb. 1810: 'Pray make up a little parcel for Sunning Hill [Ellis's residence]. ... Dr Duigenan's Catholick Question, Lord Grenville's Letter—for an article on that subject.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Feb.? 1810]: 'I have this instant heard from G E. The article is finished ... it will be overlooked by C & will make about 18 pages ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, March 16, 1810 [Notation on letter: 'No 5 Dr Duigenan Article 9']: 'I have this instant recd the enclosed from Mr. C.' The enclosure mentioned in this letter is also in the Murray archives. It reads as follows (quoted in Shine): 'Gloucester lodge / Friday March 16, 1810 / My Dear Gifford, / Is "Duign & Gnv" printed off? or would there be time for a small interpolation? If there would—I should like to see it.' The signature has been removed. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the removal of the signature may be a sign of WG's careful management of his relationship with George Canning, but it is just as likely the result of JM II's satisfying the request of an autograph hunter.] There is a notation on the enclosure: 'A note of Mr Canning to Mr Gifford inclosed in this state to J M.'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 2 Feb. 1810, asks that 'Dr Duigenan's pamphlet & Ld Grenville's letter to Ld Fingal' be sent 'as I have been requested to review them together.' Murray MS., Book Loans Register: both pamphlets reviewed were sent to 'George Ellis Esqr' on 3 Feb. 1810. Murray MS., Ellis to JM, 4 Feb. 1810, says he 'sent back the Catholic question' and that Canning is involved in writing the review. NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: 'We have an exquisite Article on Lord G. which will make him as fretful as a bear with a sore head.' Devon MS. 1149M (f.78), WG to Edward Copleston, 21 Apr. 1810: 'The writer of the Catholic Art. is ... G. Ellis; ... C[anning]. certainly furnished a few hints.' See also evidence at #72.

JM III's Register attribution to Canning and Ellis, and with the following note: 'See W G's letter Feb 9, 1810 & Nov [Mar?] 16, 1810 & G Ellis's Feb 2, 1810.'


76 Article 10. Thornton, The Present State of Turkey; or a Description of the Political, Civil, and Religious Constitution, Government, and Laws of the Ottoman Empire; the Finances, Military and Naval Establishments; the State of Learning, and of the Liberal and Mechanical Arts; the Manners and Domestic Economy of the Turks and other Subjects of the Grand Signior; &c. &c. Together with the Geographical, Political, and Civil State of the Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia. From Observations made during a Residence of fifteen Years in Constantinople and the Turkish Provinces. Second Edition, with Corrections and Additions, 129-43. Author: Reginald Heber.

Running Title: Thornton's Present State of Turkey.

Notes: In attributing the article to Heber, Shine cites JM III's Register and Heber I 347, 347n.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 4 Feb. 1810 and Ellis to JM, 4 Apr. 1810, speak of Heber's review of 'Thornton's Turkey'. Of additional interest is National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, KBK/65/1, Letter Books of Sir John Barrow, ff.56-63, Thomas Thornton to John Barrow, Burnham, 28 Mar. 1812, complaining about Lord Byron's criticisms of his work on Greece.

The first edition of the subject of this article was reviewed in ER #356, July 1807, by Henry Brougham.

JM III's Register attribution to Heber, and with the following note: 'See G E's letter Ap 4, 1810.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: that letter is not quoted in Shine.]


77 Article 11. Mémoires de la Comtesse de Lichtenau, écrits par elle-même; contenant des Anecdotes secrètes sur la Cour de Prusse, &c., 144-52. Author: Isaac D'Israeli, probably, and with a collaborator.

Running Title: Mémoires de la Comtesse de Lichtenau.

Notes: In attributing the article to D'Israeli, Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 9 Feb. 1809: 'Send ... the slips of D'Israeli's which I have engaged Mr —— to revise at Sunning Hill.' [marginal note in JM II's hand beside 'Mr ——': 'G E']. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the import of the letter quoted in Shine is not self-evident. It seems that Shine's attribution to D'Israeli partly depends upon a process of elimination. D'Israeli evidently contributed an article to this Number, and article #77 is the only likely candidate. In the letter, WG mentions Ellis's address and pointedly avoids naming the person he has in mind to sub-edit the article, so the sub-editor cannot be Ellis. Canning was a frequent visitor to Sunning Hill, and WG would have avoided naming him.]

There is no notation for this article in JM III's Register or in JM II's marked QR.


78 Article 12. Ricardo, The high Price of Bullion, a Proof of the Depreciation of Bank Notes; Francis, Reflections on the Abundance of Paper in Circulation, and the Scarcity of Specie, 152-61. Author: Robert Grant, with Edward Copleston.

Running Title: Sir P. Francis and Ricardo on Bullion.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Copleston, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see Smiles I 176-77. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: Smiles speculates that the author was George Ellis.] Shine also cites Davidson Cook in 'Murray's Mysterious Reviewer,' Twentieth Century, CI (April, 1927), 605-13. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: Cook incorrectly identifies the author as William Greenfield.] Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 13 Mar. 1810: 'Pray be careful to remember that the anonymous writer of Ricardo is a different person from the anonymous writer of Parr.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: WG's denial in this letter of Grant's authorship of #78 should be read in the light of Grant's strenuous insistence that his contributions be kept a deep secret. To mask (perhaps from Ellis) what might have been a good clue, WG is suggesting to Murray that they adopt the fiction that the author of Parr and this article are not one and the same.]

The following evidence was first published in VPR 24. BL MS. 28099 (f.85), quoted below definitively demonstrates that Grant was the article's author. Bodleian MS., Eng. Lett. d.214 (f.55), Robert Grant to Reginald Heber, 'Ireland' 11 Oct. 1809, concerning topics he might cover in the QR, says he sees a work on paper money that could be a pretext 'for attacking the present code of the Edinburgh wits [i.e., the Edinburgh Review] about money matters.' BL MS. 28099 (f.72), WG to George Ellis, 6 Apr. 1810: 'I am glad of your little remark on Ricardo, as it may be useful. I can convey it to our nameless friend through Heber. He has promised a review of Gifford's lumbering life of Wm Pitt ....' (Cf. #114.) BL MS. 28099 (f.85), WG to Ellis, 15 Nov. 1810: explaining why Grant has declined to write again on bank restriction, WG quotes Grant as saying that '[t]he subject has now assumed a delicacy from which, when I wrote on Ricardo, it was exempt.' NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: 'The next thing on Paper money is anonymous, and came to me thro. a third hand' (probably Grant to Heber to Teignmouth). Murray MS., Ellis to JM, 4 Apr. 1810, speaks of this article as 'very masterly certainly.' Fetter: William Greenfield (probably), cites 'Cook; Ellis letters' at Murray and notes that 'the Ellis letters at Murray's make it clear that Ellis did not do the review and indicate his belief that "our unknown correspondent" did it.' The Ricardo volume under review was published by John Murray.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #547, Feb. 1811, by T. R. Malthus, and in ER #574, Aug. 1811, by T. R. Malthus.

[Bookseller's note: 'Ricardo's first separate publication. Ricardo had published in 1809 an article in the 'Morning Chronicle' on the high price of bullion and he more fully set out his arguments in the present work. It at once established his reputation as an economist and three more editions appeared within four months. Ricardo argued that the high price of bullion, which had raised from St. 3.17 to 4.12 within a few months, was merely the result of the increase of the number of bank notes. The obligation of the Bank of England to pay their notes in specie on demand could only be effected by diminishing the number of bank notes in circulation.']

JM III's Register: ? G Ellis with the following notes: 'See G E's letter Mar 8, 1810 & Ap 4.' and, in pencil, 'Coplestone [sic] wrote an Art in this No. See G Ellis Feb 1810.'


79 Article 13. Journal d'un Voyage dans la Turquie d'Asie et la Perse, fait en 1807, et 1808, 161-67. Author not identified.

Running Title: French Embassy to Persia.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article.

The following information is published here for the first time. The topic falls within John Barrow's purview, but there is no evidence, external or internal, to suggest that the article is his. There is some indication in primary sources that Edward Copleston had an article in this Number, but in no other instance did he review travel literature. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 4 Feb. 1810, says he is very sorry that 'Copplestone's article' [sic] should have been suppressed because he thought it 'a very good one.' Murray MS., same letter, 'Sunday' [i.e., 11 Feb], says he is glad that Copleston's article will now be printed because he 'thought it very good'. These allusions to 'Copleston's article' probably point to #81 and should be understood as the article procured by Copleston. The following two letters WG to Edward Copleston bear on the question of which article is being referred to. Devon MS. 1149M (f.113), WG to Edward Copleston, [after 28 March 1810]: WG thanks Copleston for procuring 'Sidney Smith' (i.e., #81) and encloses payment to be handed on but does not mention any article by Copleston. Devon MS. 1149M (f.114) and Devon MS. 1149M (f.76), WG to Copleston, 17 Feb. 1810: Richard Heber and Edward Copleston encouraged as a contributor John Latham (1787-1853), a school friend of Reginald Heber and graduate of Brasenose College, Oxford. Copleston, however, discovered that his article was 'intractable' and WG agreed that it should be set aside.


80 Article 14. Burges, Ενξιπιδο Τξωιαες. Euripidis Troades, partim Codicum Manuscriptorum, partim ope conjecturarum emendata. Subjicitur Appendix, in quâ Carminibus Euripideis quœ vulagò habenteur Monsostrophica verus et vetus ordo nunc demum restituitur. Studio G. Burges, A. B. Tin. Coll. Cantabrigiæ, Deighton; Ενξιπιδο Θóινισσαι. Euripidis Phœnissæ. Cum Notulis edidit G. Burges, A. B. Londini. Lunn., 167-85. Author: James Henry Monk, possibly.

Running Title: Burges's Euripidies.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Monk, Shine cites JM III's Register.

The following information was first published in VPR 28. Monk wrote #138, 492, and 571, also on classical subjects. He was a recent graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge (M.A. 1807). At the time this article appeared, Monk was Regius Professor of Greek. As a newly appointed professor in a field known for its bitter rivalries, Monk was perhaps the object of academic malice, malice that is reflected in the gossip D'Oyly retailed to WG in the letter cited below. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: on 2 Feb. 1810 JM II paid £2 to ship a MS. from Cambridge. Devon MS. 1149M (f.78), WG to Edward Copleston, 21 Apr. 1810: 'The Reviewer of the Herculanensia is Dr. Thos Young. The Euri[pides]. I do not know; but he is of T[rinity] Coll. ^ Cambridge, I understand and a st<ude>nt.' Murray MS., JM to WG, 25 Sept. 1810 [draft]: 'I asked Mr Doyly what he thought of the Review of Burgesses Euripides—he said it was supposed to be written by an under graduate & they did not think much of it.' Cf. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: Butler's Æschylus sent to '<?> Camb.' on 4 Jan. 1810; Murray MS., Cash Book 1811-17, p. 4: '6 Dec 1811 QR Sophocles sent to Rev. Mr Monk Cambridge.' However, Murray MS., J. Monk to JM III, 15 Jan. 1858, says his father's first review was in QR Number 9, of Blomfield's Prometheus Vinctus (i.e., #138). Murray MS., Cash Book 1810-11, p. 7: '1810, Feb 1 Quarterly Review No 5 Dr [i.e., debit] Aristophanes <Peter> Elmsley'. The Cash Book reference probably indicates that a copy of Elmsley's Aristophanes was provided to the author of #80. At about this time, John Symmons also wrote for WG on classics (see #92). He was, however, a recent graduate of Oxford University. [These notes produced with the assistance of Dr. Christopher Stray, Swansea; any errors, however, the responsibility of the present writer.]

JM II's marked QR: [in pencil] 'Q[UER]Y Monk'.

JM III's Register: queries 'Prof Monk', cites JM II's marked QR and includes the following note: 'Uncertain.'


81 Article 15. Sydney Smith, A Sermon preached before his Grace the Archbishop of York, and the Clergy, at Malton, at the Visitation, August 1809, 185-94. Authors: John William Ward, Lord Dudley, with William Gifford and John Ireland.

Running Title: Sydney Smith's Visitation Sermon.

Notes: In querying its co-attribution to Ireland and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, postmark 31 Mar. 1810 [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: only part of the relevant portion of the letter is quoted in Shine; the letter is more fully quoted in what follows]: 'I have seen the Dr [Ireland] & he laughs at the idea. Let us keep our own secrets, & we shall do well.' Notation on letter: 'Article on Syndey Smith in No 5 after my application to Mr G.' Murray MS., WG to JM, 30 Mar. 1810 [notation in JM II's hand: 'Article on Sidney Smith in No 5 after my application to Mr G—to know if it were quite proper. J.M.']: says 'I wish for my part, that every writer in the Rev. was unknown to me, & that not an Article was heard of till it came out. Nothing is so hostile to our success, as having too many confidants—but we shall grow wiser in our time, I hope.' Shine also quotes Smiles's transcription of Murray MS., Ellis to JM, 4 Apr. 1810: 'G[ifford]. though the best tempered man alive, is terribly severe with his pen; but S.S. would suffer ten times more by being turned into ridicule ... than from being slashed and cauterized in that manner.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: Smiles, but not Shine, quotes the following additional passage from the letter. Concerning an article in this Number, WG must 'guard against the bad taste of Dr. I.'] In suggesting Dudley alone as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register. In suggesting John Wilson Croker as a third alternative attribution, Shine cites Smith vi and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138.

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Devon MS. 1149M (f.75), WG to Edward Copleston, 3 Jan. 1810: Richard Heber says that Copleston's friend will review Sydney Smith. Devon MS. 1149M (f.114), WG to Copleston, 9 Feb. 1810, says he is happy that 'Sidney is ready.' BL MS. 28099 (f.69-72), WG to Ellis, 12 Feb. [1810], discussing articles in this Number, says that '[Sydney Smith] is a nuisance to be abused; not merely a Jack pudding parson; but a mischievous partisan ... [who] put me in a towering passion.' Bodleian MS. Eng. lett. d.309 (f.20), Richard Heber to Copleston, [3 Mar. 1810], says WG thanks Copleston for the article on Sydney Smith's sermons and asks permission for himself and Dr. Ireland to make alterations and additions, to give the article pungency. Devon MS. (f.113), WG to Copleston, [late Mar. or early Apr. 1810]: thanks Copleston for procuring the article on Sydney Smith; the article is from Copleston's friend. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, n.d., speaks of WG as having been harsh with Sydney Smith. BL MS. 28099 (f.71-72), WG to Ellis, [6 Apr. 1810], excuses his severity toward Sydney Smith and refers to the 'little headpiece' mentioned in Devon MS. (f.113), which Dudley, through Copleston, apparently agreed to let WG insert; 'the rest is his [Dudley's] own'. Devon MS. 1149M (f.79), WG to Copleston, 18 Oct. 1810, makes it clear that Dudley had recently submitted his first contribution. NLS MS. 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: 'Look at your friend Sidney Smith [in this Number], and see how we have graced him. If he continues to print Sermons, I will not as Stephano says, take too much from him: he is a present for any Reviewer that ever trod on <shoe> leather.'

JM II's marked QR: 'Lord Dudley'.

JM III's Register: queries Lord Dudley and adds the following note: '?Dr Ireland. See Ellis letter Apr 4, 1810.


82 Article 16. Barrow, Voyage à la Cochinchine, par les Iles de Madère, de Ténériffe et du Cap Verd, le Bresil et l'Ile de Java. Par John Barrow, &c. Traduit de l'Angalis, avec de Notes et Additions. Par Malte-Brun, 194-205. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Barrow—Voyage à la Cochinchine, &c.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Typical of Barrow in topic, tone, and argument, the review is transparently self-serving. The opening sentence of the article refers back to #48, Barrow's first contribution. There is a reference to Barrow on p.198. The article is referred to at #139, which is also by Barrow. A passage from #82 is quoted in #600, which is also by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works.

The English edition of this article was reviewed in ER #311, Oct. 1806, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM II's marked QR: 'Barrow'.

JM III's Register attribution to Barrow, citing JM II's marked QR, but without further evidence.


83 Article 17. Herbert Marsh, A Course of Lectures, containing a Description and systematic Arrangement of the several Branches of Divinity, accompanied with an Account, both of the principal Authors and of the Progress which has been made at different Periods in Theological Learning, 205-18. Author: George D'Oyly, probably.

Running Title: Herbert Marsh's Lectures.

Notes: In attributing the article to George D'Oyly, Shine cites D'Oyly I xxiv where the article is claimed for D'Oyly. In suggesting James Henry Monk as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register. In suggesting Charles James Blomfield as a third alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register.

The following information is published here for the first time. Blomfield was Marsh's promoter. Marsh was a contributor to the QR. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr Whitaker' on 19 Jan. 1810. Devon MS. 1149M (f.114), WG to Edward Copleston, 9 Feb. 1810, 'I had the pleasure yesterday of hearing for the first time from Dr Whitaker.'

JM II's marked QR: [in pencil] 'Monk or Bloomfield'.

JM III's Register attribution : 'Monk or Blomfield' and cites JM II's marked QR.


84 Article 18. Charnock, Biographical Memoirs of Lord Viscount Nelson, &c., &c., &c.; with Observations, Critical and Explanatory; Harrison, The Life of Lord Nelson; Churchill, The Life of Lord Viscount Nelson, Duke of Bronté, &c; Clarke and M'Arthur, The Life of Admiral Lord Nelson, K.B. from his Lordship's Manuscripts, 218-62. Author: Robert Southey, with excisions by William Gifford.

Running Title: Lives of Nelson.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites JM III's Register; Water II 413, III 283; Cottle 242-43; Southey 291, 291n, 577; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138; QR CCX 746; and Clark 176, 179; and says to see also Warter II 180, 184, 185, 194; Southey 257; and Smiles I 177. Shine also quotes from the following letters. BL Add. MS. 30928 (no folio number given), Robert Southey to Charles Danvers, 14 Dec. 1809: 'Yesterday I received a letter from Gifford requesting me to review the great life of Nelson, and offering me 20 guineas a sheet to do it .... The Life of Nelson is by Stainer Clark, whose ... laying unhallowed hands upon such a subject, I am desired not to spare.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [10 Mar. 1810]: 'I have begun Nelson; and though I have many erasures to make, I confess I think what remains very good.'

The following evidence and discussion is published here for the first time. The article appears in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. Murray MS., Cash Book 1810-11, p.27: '5 April 1810 Quarterly Review / Article 18 extra £13.10 cheque No 799 ....' Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 4 Feb. 1810, says he is glad that Southey's article is to be 'animated and inserted.' NLS MS 3879 (f.50), WG to Walter Scott, 28 Mar. 1810: '[W]e have also a very well written Article by Southey—indeed excellent. It has cost me an infinity of pains, merely, however, to reduce it, for it originally filled four sheets!' NLS MS. 2528 (f.7), WG to Robert Southey, 18 Apr. 1810: '... your most beautiful Essay on the Lives of Nelson. Sorry I was (and I ask your pardon sincerely for it) to be driven by circumstances to some omissions; but I have the consolation of thinking that not one syllable of yours has been changed.' Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 4 Apr. 1810, wonders how Murray could ever have thought ill of Southey's Nelson. John Murray reprinted the essay as a separate volume, with the portions excised by WG returned. Southey's Nelson is considered to be one of the gems of English prose.

[Bookseller's note on Charnock: 'A revised edition of a work originally published in the wake of the Battle of Copenhagen, updated to include Nelson's apotheosis at Trafalgar. Charnock was a naval volunteer, and his work is based largely on letters he had collected for a general naval history, many of which were supplied by Captain William Locker.']

JM II's marked QR: 'Southey'.

JM III's Register attribution to Southey, but without evidence.

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