Vol 5. No. 10 - Index

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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 5 , NUMBER 10 (May 1811)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 1 July 1811 [Courier 29 June announced the Number for 1 July; Murray MS. Paid Contributors list records publication as 2 July; Devon MS. 1149 (f. 92), WG to Edward Copleston, 24 June 1811: '[W]e shall be out by Saturday' (29 June).]

  • Murray printed 6000 for this Number [Murray MS., 1803-23 Letter Book]

  • This Number cost Murray £220.15.6 for articles, including £50 for the editor

  • Printer: C. Rowarth, Bell-yard, Temple-bar, London

  • Booksellers (listed on the title page): Hatchard, Piccadilly; Richardson, Cornhill; Parker, Oxford; Deighton, Cambridge; William Blackwood, Edinburgh; M. N. Mahon, Dublin

  • Murray MS. Quarterly Review Debit Register, p. 36, for Number 10 has been destroyed (No. 9 was on the obverse), possibly because at some point someone identified the articles' authors

  • The following Notice appears on page 528 of this Number:
We should esteem it a favour if our anonymous correspondents would indicate a channel by which our observations might reach them.
  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 8
  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 5

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


141 Article 1. Géographie de Strabon, traduite du Grec en Français, 274-303. Author: Thomas Falconer, with Edward Copleston.

Running Title: French Translation of Strabo.

Notes: In attributing the article to Falconer, Shine cites JM III's Register; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138; and the DNB article on Falconer. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 17 July 1810: 'The French Strabo must be sent ... to the Revd Mr T Falkner, Bath.' 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Rev. T. Falconer' on 10 July 1810. Devon MS. 1149M (f.80), WG to Edward Copleston, 9 Jan. 1811, states that Copleston has provided an introduction to 'Falconer' and has otherwise generally improved it. Devon MS. 1149M (f.81), WG to Edward Copleston, 11 Feb. 1811: 'We have a tremendously long Article in this No. as you know. But the writer has laid out his whole soul in it, and no further abridgement can take place — though I lament that nature has not endowed our Bath friend with the faculty of compression.' Devon MS. 1149M (f.82), WG to Copleston, 17 Feb. 1811: 'The Strabo of our Bath friend is follement long, and the last (1st) part slovenly in style.' Devon MS. 1149M (f.83), WG to Copleston, 26 Feb. 1811: 'I have in this No. an article on Clavier's Ancient Greece ... which ... will oblige me to postpone Falconer to our next ....' BL MS. 28099 (f.95), WG to George Ellis, 15 Apr. 1811, mentions a 'geographical' article by Falconer for this Number procured by Heber. Devon MS. 1149M (f.91), WG to Copleston, 31 May 1811: 'Falconer is the first Article in this No. .... The only interesting part ... you were kind enough to append.' Falconer published Two Letters . . . on the Articles in the Edinburgh Review, relating to the Oxford Strabo (John Murray, 1811), and in 1817 an English translation of Strabo. Copleston's likely contribution to a recent QR article (see #113 above), a passage on Strabo, is cited in the opening paragraph of this article (cp. the first letter cited above).

The Oxford edition of Strabo was reviewed in ER #478, July 1809, by R. Payne Knight and the Traduction de Strabon in ER #513, Apr. 1810, possibly by R. Payne Knight.

JM III's Register: attribution to Falconer, but without evidence.


142 Article 2. Kirkpatrick, An Account of the Kingdom of Nepaul; being the Substance of Observations made during a Mission to that Country, in the Year 1793. Illustrated with a Map and other Engravings, 303-32. Author: John Barrow, with John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Kirkpatrick's Account of the Kingdom of Nepaul.

Notes: In attributing the article to Henry Barry, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine misquotes the following letter (reading 'Barry' for 'Barr<ow>'):  Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811; 'No. 120']: 'I send you the first 16 pages of Barry .... The rest tomorrow ... the Revise is gone to the Admiralty as C[roker] wished to look at it.' Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811, 'No. 123']: 'I send the first page of Nepaul ... the remainder ... will make about 12 pages .... Pray let this part of Nepaul be set up up without delay.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [28 May 1811]: 'I think Barry [Baring?] will amuse. Can it be got in?'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Shine misreads 'Barry' for 'Barrow' in the entry in JM III's Register for this article. The reference in Murray MS. WG to JM, [May 1811; 'No. 120'], quoted above is probably not to #152—it is 13 pages long—the only other likely candidate in this Number. Note emphasis on China, a topic that is Barrow's preserve. There is a specific reference on p.307 to #85 (p.292), an article by Barrow: 'We entirely concur .... agrees with one we ventured to give in a former Number, with regard to those Sanscrit works, which had been transferred into the Chinese language, prior to the Mahomedan invasion of Hidostan.' In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. Nepal as spelled in the article's head note and running title as above. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #572, Aug. 1811, by Sydney Smith.

[Bookseller's note: 'In 1793, following disputes between the Nepalese and the Lama of Tibetwhich was under the protection of China— a Chinese army crossed Tibet and established quarters near Katmandu. Kirkpatrick, a staff officer under Lord Cornwallis in India, was dispatched to Nepal to mediate. As the rather romantic opening paragraph of the Preface states, "No Englishman had hitherto passed beyond the range of lofty mountains which separates the secluded valley of Nepaul from the north-eastern parts of Bengal; and the public curiosity respecting that Terra Incognita (as it might then be justly called), was still ungratified., when toward the close of the year 1792, an opportunity was unexpectedly presented to the British government in India, of removing the veil which had so long interposed between the two countries."']

JM III's Register: attribution to '? Mr Barr<ow>', and with the following note: 'See W G's letter No 120 & 123'.


143 Article 3. Daniel and Samuel Lysons, Magna Britannia; a concise Topographical Account of the several Counties of Great Britain, 332-39. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker.

Running Title: Lysons—Magna Britannia.

Notes: In attributing the article to Whitaker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Nichols viii, xiv, xxix, xxxiv. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr. Whitaker' 15 Dec. 1810. There are parallels in treatment and content between this article and #118, which is also by Whitaker. Both articles open with a paeon to Gough and both works find humor in Chalmers' mermaid. The subject of this article is Whitaker's preserve.

JM III's Register: queries its attribution to Whitaker.


144 Article 4. Dealtry, The Principles of Fluxions: designed for the Use of the students in the University, 340-52. Author: Olinthus Gregory, probably; with John Ireland and possibly with George D'Oyly.

Running Title: Dealtry's Principles of Fluxions.

Notes: In querying its attribution to George D'Oyly, with an alternative queried attribution to John Ireland, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [dated by another hand 'May? 1811']: 'I sent all of Dealtry but the last leaf which I am obliged to keep, because I have not yet seen Dr Ireland. This little addition must come in there.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [1811]: 'Dr I[reland] <sent> last night for the last leaf of Dealtry & De Motu ... I told you that Dr I would positively reach me on Wednesday.' WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'D'Oyly has not yet sent his proof....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [17 May 1811]: 'D'Oyly has not been sent but I think the first sheet will want few alterations ....'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27 and VPR 28. The evidence for attribution is certainly confusing but on balance establishes Gregory as the primary author. Ireland seems to have been brought in to ensure that the article did not contain language that would be offensive to the Saints (parliamentary Evangelical philanthropists under William Wilberforce). On the face of it, the letters seem to suggest Ireland as the primary author. However, mathematics formed no part of Ireland's expertise while at this time Gregory had a monopoly on mathematics in the QR. The subject is picked up again, possibly by Gregory, in #519 (p. 148). The letters that Shine quotes from in support of D'Oyly as primary author more likely refer to #145. D'Oyly was perhaps brought in as sub-editor of this article because he shared with Dealtry an association with Cambridge University or volunteered as protector of its reputation.

Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812, says that Ireland 'check[ed] the eagerness of Dealtry & the other disputants' in this mathematical debate 'who were growing rather fierce'. BL MS., 28099 (f.65), WG to George Ellis, [26 Nov. 1810]: 'I have not written to our friend [Thomas] Young. ... There is a treatise on Fluxion by Dealtry come out this morning—would this, think you, suit him? And yet there is a difficulty, for if a favourable account could not be given of it, I should not wish to have it noticed. The saints are scandalized at out treatment of him in the last No. [cp. #106] ... that I should not like to venture another attack on him.' Criticism of Bossut on pp.340-49 similar to that on pp.157-58 of #215, which is also probably by Gregory. The promotion of Hutton's trigonometry table is a repetition of p.401 of #122, which is also probably by Gregory. Hutton (mentioned again on p.351 of the article) was Gregory's mentor. 

The second edition of the subject of this article was reviewed in ER #769, Sept. 1816, by John Playfair.

JM III's Register: attribution to Dr. Ireland (crossed out); attribution to D'Oyly, and with the following note: 'See W G's letter No. 119 & 121'


145 Article 5. The State of the Established Church, in a series of Letters to the Right Honourable Spencer Perceval, Chancellor of the Exchequer, &c. Second Edition, 352-65. Author: George D'Oyly.

Running Title: State of the Established Church.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Henry Home Drummond, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811, 'No. 120']: 'And we must see if we cannot foist in Drummond [into Number 10].' 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Devon MS. 1149M (f.91), WG to Edward Copleston, 31 May 1811, says that the theological article in this Number, by a Cambridge man, is deficient in style, a complaint he had made elsewhere against D'Oyly. Murray MS., WG to JM, [1811]: 'Dr I[reland] <sent> last night for the last leaf of Dealtry & De Motu ... I told you that Dr I would positively reach me on Wednesday.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'D'Oyly has not yet sent his proof....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [17 May 1811]: 'D'Oyly has not been sent but I think the first sheet will want few alterations ....' Devon MS. (f.92), WG to Copleston, 24 June 1811, says that on Copleston's advice WG rejected a manuscript from 'H. Drummond'. (Cp. evidence at #113 above.) On p.358 the author associates himself with Cambridge University. 

JM III's Register: queries attribution to Drummond (in pencil), and with the following note: 'See W G's Letter No 120'


146 Article 6. The Substance of a Speech delivered by Lieutenant-General Tarleton, in a committee of the House of Commons, on the Army Estimates, March 4, 1811, 366-72. Author: John William Ward, Lord Dudley, probably, and John Wilson Croker; possibly with John Barrow.

Running Title: General Tarleton's Speech.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker and 'Mr B's Friend', Shine cites JM III's Register; Brightfield 453; and the DNB article on Croker. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [9 May 1811]: '... [the] review of Tarleton ... is not from Mr C[roker] but comes from Mr B[arrow]'s friend.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'I like Mr Croker's alterations [to Tarleton] as far as they go, very much indeed.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'Not knowing that Mr Croker was out of town I left both sheets at the Admiralty as Tarleton was divided between them.' Iowa MS., JM to [Croker], 3 Jun3 1811: ' ... Barrow ... told me that he had sent the Sheet with Tarleton upon it ...'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. BL MS. 28099 (ff.89-90), WG to George Ellis, [31 Dec. 1810]: '... lest you should already have hit upon Sir R. Wilson [#132] ... I have a review of him in hand. I know not the writer, but am told he is ... a young man, but in parliament. The offer of his assistance came thro' Barrow.' Devon MS. 1149M (f.88), WG to Edward Copleston, 13 Apr. 1811: 'There is, I am told, a very foolish speech of a very foolish fellow, Gen. Tarleton ... but perhaps it is not worth our friend's [i.e., Lord Dudley's] notice—yet it might furnish something on Portugal.' Reference is made on page 367 of this article to observations in #134, which is also by Dudley. Claimed by Croker in five of his holograph Clements Library lists and in the Cambridge Library bound collection of his articles. The phrase 'divided between them' in Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811] quoted by Shine may refer to Croker and Barrow.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker and with the following note: 'Croker revised this, but W.G. writes May 9, 1811 "it is not from Mr C. but comes from Mr B's friend."'


147 Article 7. Marshman, A Dissertation on the Characters and Sounds of the Chinese Language; including Tables of the Elementary Characters, and of the Chinese Monosyllables, 372-403. Author: John Barrow and George Thomas Staunton.

Running Title: Marshman's A Dissertation on the Chinese Language.

Notes: In attributing the article to Staunton alone, Shine cites JM III's Register and notes its citation of JM II's marked QR. Shine says to see also Grierson II 441, 441n.

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Staunton was at this point actively supplying Barrow with information on the topic of this article. The article's author refers back to #48 (specific reference to p.273), #82, and 85, all of which are also by Barrow. This article is referred to in #302, 333, 349, and 389 (twice), all of which are by Barrow. The author of #142WI (probably Barrow) takes credit for this article and articles #85, 119, 333, and 389, all of which are by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works.

JM II's marked QR: [in pencil] 'Sir G. Staunton'.

[Bookseller's note, modified: 'Marshman (1768-1837), a British orientalist, was a bookseller by the age of 15, then became a weaver and educated himself by reading continuously at his loom, before being called to India to serve as a missionary. This was his first book, preceding his translation of the works of Confucius (see below); he then published a Chinese grammar and the first Chinese Bible which was the first book printed in Chinese from moveable metal type. He later published the first newspaper ever printed in any Oriental language. Marshman resided at the mission in Serampore, and there he translated the Bible into at least nine Indian dialects, all the while teaching and establishing other missions. The Catholic Encyclopedia states that "The first Protestant (Ye-su-kiao) worker among the Chinese was Joshua Marshman, though he did not go to China, his labours being carried on in Bengal, at Serampore, where he died 7 Dec., 1837." With Marshman's book on the Chinese language are bound Books I-III (of V) of his translation of The Works of Confucius, likewise printed at the Baptist Mission Press in Serampore. In 1812 a fire destroyed the Baptist Mission Press, although a number of the most important matrices were saved. By 1820 it had regained prominence as the most important printing operation in India.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Staunton, citing JM II's marked QR.


148 Article 8. Pasley, Essay on the Military Policy and Institutions of the British Empire, 403-37. Author: Robert Southey and John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Capt. Pasley on the Military Policy of Gr. Britain.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Southey and Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Water II 209-10, 223, 228, 308; Southey 272, 274-75; Foster 155; Rickman 154; and Heber I 411. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [1811]: '... Pasley ... must go thru more hands than Southey's ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1811]: '... Southey ... is perfectly incorrect and dangerous .... Southey's article [on Pasley] ... would involve us in quarrels with all parties and commit the Review to principles which cannot be maintained.... I must show it to some person or other ... I must <consult> ... one or other of our great men ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'I have looked over Pasley & like it very much; but I cannot correct it, till Mr C has finally done with it.' Iowa MS., JM to [Croker], 3 June [1811]: ' ... I went to the Admiralty and saw there Mr Barrow .... as I could not ascertain anything respecting a packet which I had sent on Saturday afternoon containing Pasley, I have thought it better to send you another Copy ....'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Pages 435-37 of this article are reprinted in Southey's Essays [1832], I 22-26. The article is in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. Devon MS. 1149M (f.88), WG to Edward Copleston, 13 Apr. 1811: '... unfortunately Southey has taken up Paisley, & sent me an article on it, which I am endeavoring by all possible means to make safe and readable .... ' BL MS. 28099 (f.95), WG to George Ellis, 15 Apr. 1811, says that 'Canning has seen it [Southey's article on Pasley] ... [It is] full, of course, of imperfect views, & dangerous statements.' Clements Library MS., Croker to WG, 26 Mar. 1811: 'I have not heard about the Review yet from Mr Murray.' Claimed by Croker in four of his holograph Clements Library lists (one entry is queried), but the article is not in the Cambridge Library bound collection of his articles.

JM II's marked QR: 'Southey & Croker.' 

[Booksellers' notes, modified: 'Influential and reforming work, cites the on-going lessons of the Napoleonic conflicts in the Peninsula and Mediterranean affairs in a critique of British military institutions.' 'No second part was published.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Southey citing JM II's marked QR and Robert Cooke's Memorandum Book, and with the following note: 'Aided by Croker'.


149 Article 9. Lee, The Odes of Pindar, in celebration of Victors in the Olympic, Pythean, Nemean, and Isthmean Games, translated from the Greek, not one fourth part of which have ever appeared in English, including those by Mr. West; Girdlestone, All the Odes of Pindar, Translated from the Original Greek, 437-57. Author: Reginald Heber.

Running Title: Translations of Pindar.

Notes: In attributing the article to Heber, Shine cites JM III's Register; Heber I 350, 350n; and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'Mr Heber wishes to see the proof of Pindar.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'I ... send back Pindar ... in hopes that you may be able to send it to Hodnet Hall ...' [Heber's residence.] Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'Pindar is arrived ... it wants an extract or two.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [12 June 1811]: 'Deffand [#153] I have not heard of—nor is Girdleston [#149] come back, though—M—H [i.e., Mr Heber?] expects it some time today.'  

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Rev. R. Heber, Hodnet' on 8 Mar. 1810. Murray MS., WG to JM [May? 1811]: 'I have heard from Mr Reginald Heber this morning, he promises Pindar this week.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]: 'Mr Heber wishes to see the proof of Pindar.' 

JM III's Register: attribution to Heber, but without evidence.


150 Article 10. Reflections on the Nature and Extent of the Licence Trade; An Enquiry into the State of our Commercial Relations with the Northern Powers, with reference to our Trade with them under the Regulations of Licences, 457-71. Author: George Ellis.

Running Title: Reflections on the Licence Trade.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Ellis, Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1811]:  Pray send ME the pamphlet for it is a subject much canvassed—Mr C[anning] thinks that a "Licences" will be important.' 

The following evidence was first published in VPR  24.  BL MS. 28099 (f.93), WG to George Ellis, 19 Feb. 1811: 'The 'Licence' pamphlets Murray will procure for you.' BL MS. 28099 (f.96), WG to Ellis, 15 Apr. 1811: '[`Licences'] I have always reserved for you.... I shall be happy to get your first Article which I presume will be ... the Commercial licences.'


151 Article 11. Tighe, Psyche, with other Poems, 471-85. Author: Reginald Heber, probably.

Running Title: Mrs. Tighe's Psyche.

Notes: In attributing the article to Heber, Shine cites JM III's Register and notes its citation of JM II's marked QR.

The following information is published here for the first time. The reviewer refers repeatedly to an earlier translation by Hudson Gurney of Apuleias' 'Cupid and Psyche' (on pages 471, 475, and 481).

[Bookseller's note, modified: 'Mary Tighe's Psyche was greatly admired on first publication in 1805, although it has now been largely forgotten. Its early admirers  included John Keats, who took some hints from it for Endymion.']

JM II's marked QR: 'Heber.'

JM III's Register: attribution to Heber, citing JM II's marked QR, but without additional evidence.


152 Article 12. Baron von Sack, A Narrative of a Voyage to Surinam; of a Residence there during 1805, 1806, and 1807; and of the Author's Return to Europe, by the way of North America, 485-98. Author: John Barrow, probably.

Running Title: Baron von Sack's Voyage to Surinam.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, the Shine volume does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Numerous marks of Barrow's authorship. The article is expository, not analytical. Note the reviewer's wry wit. Note the emphasis on geographical information. Note comment on frontispiece, on slave trade, on German imagination, on Stedman's narrative, all interests of Barrow's. Note the ref. on p.497 to Staunton and China, and on page 498 to ship-building, all of which are topics that point to Barrow. The author represents dates as '25th of January' etc., in Barrow's manner. 


153 Article 13. Correspondence inédite de Madame Du Deffand, avec D'Alembert, Montesquieu, Le Président Henault, La Duchesse Du Maine; Mesdames De Choiseul, De Staal; Le Marquis D'Argens, Le Chevalier D'Aydie, etc.; Letters of the Marquise Du Deffand to the Hon. Horace Walpole, afterwards Earl of Orford, from the Year 1766 to the Year 1780. To which are added Letters of Madame Du Deffand to Voltaire, from the Year 1750 to the Year 1775. Published from the Originals at Strawberry- Hill, 498-528. Author: Charles Grant, probably, and possibly with John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Letters of Mad. Du Deffand, &c.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Grant and Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; the DNB article on Grant; Brightfield 453; and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [Jan. 1810]: 'Should not something be said to Mr Croker about the translation of Deffand?' Murray MS., WG to JM, [1811]: 'If you have not sent Madame du Deffand to Sunning Hill [Elli's residence], pray send it to me, as I shall be able to find a good writer for it.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [12 June 1811]: 'Deffand I have not heard of—nor is Girdleston [#149] come back, though—M—H [i.e., Mr Heber?] expects it some time today.'  

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, [Oct. or Nov. 1809], says that the letters of Madame du Deffand 'will serve my purpose well for an article for our next'. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Geo. Ellis' on 22 Nov. 1809. Murray MS., George Ellis to JM, 3 Dec. 1809, promises an article on this subject. Murray MS., Ellis to JM, 2 Feb. 1810, says the article on Deffand will wait. The article is not claimed by Croker in any of his holograph Clements Library lists, nor is it in the Cambridge Library bound collection of his articles. In his lists, Croker often includes articles to which he made a substantial editorial contribution and usually indicates his collaboration with a 'P' (i.e., part), but not in this case. The evidence Shine presents for Grant is not definitive. 

Correspondence de Madame du Deffand et de Mademoiselle de Lespinasse was reviewed in ER #508, Jan. 1810, by Francis Jeffrey, and Letters of Madame du Deffand in ER #544, Feb. 1811, by John Playfair.

[Bookseller's note: 'The Marquise du Deffand was proud, cynical, openly selfish - and immensely witty. She hosted a salon in Paris that attracted scientists, writers and all who were of any consequence in the world of letters and in society. She carried on a correspondence for many years with some of the most important thinkers and statesmen of her day. Her letters to Horace Walpole, English man of letters and inventor of the Gothic novel are telling, sharp, and brilliant. Just so are her letters to Voltaire.']

JM II's marked QR: 'Croker'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Grant (a previous attribution having been erased) and with the following note: 'Aided by Croker' and to support the suggestion cites JM II's marked QR.


The following advertisement (only the heading of which is transcribed below) is bound in Volume Five Number Ten. It follows the Quarterly List of New Publications section. The advertisement is unique in the Quarterly as, for the most part, only booksellers' advertisements appeared at the end of a volume. Burney having been John Murray II's childhood tutor probably explains its presence.


A PROSPECTUS

OF

THE PLAN OF EDUCATION

AT

THE NAVAL ACADEMY,

COLD HABOUR, GOSPORT;

WHERE YOUNG GENTLEMEN ARE GENTEELLY BOARDED AND CAREFULLY INSTRUCTED

IN EVERY BRANCH OF USEFUL AND POLITE LITERATURE.

-

By WILLIAM BURNEY, LL. D.

Published @ RC

February 2005

City

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