Vol 7. No. 13 - Index

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Quarterly Review
VOLUME 7 , NUMBER 13 (March 1812)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 11 May 1812

  • This Number initially sold about 4800 of 5000 printed. At this time Gifford estimated the journal's total readership to be at least 50,000

  • Booksellers listed on the title page: Hatchard, Piccadilly; Richardson, Cornhill; Parker, Oxford; Deighton, Cambridge; William Blackwood, Edinburgh; J. Cumming, Dublin

  • In February, William Drummond, anticipating a review of his privately circulated Oedipus Judaicus, warned Gifford against publishing and called Southey a 'masked assassin' for having criticized, in #169, his (Drummond's) private religious opinions. See #248, George D'Oyly's article on Drummond

  • Robert Walpole, writing to John Murray in February, asked Murray to forward an enclosure to Gifford and praised 'Montgomery' (#172). Walpole has not been identified as a contributor to the QR

  • The following advertisement is appended to [John Wilson Croker], A Key to the Orders in Council 6th edn. [pamphlet] London: John Murray, 1812 (note that Number 14 appeared 14 August 1812):
Quarterly Review No. 13 is just published, and contains a complete view of the operation of the Orders in Council, as they affect our commercial interests with America. ... No. 14 will be published early in June 1812, and the future Numbers regularly every three months.
  • At the head of the Quarterly List of New Publications appended to this Number, an unusual notice appears, running to 180 words, that warns readers against Enthusiastic Cheap Repository tracts as 'unprincipled piracy' of Hannah More's series, Cheap Repository Tracts

  • April to August, Wellington gained successes in the Peninsula. But he ultimately had to fall back on Ciudad Rodrigo

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #180 and #189

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 10

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


180 Article 1. Sheffield, The Orders in Council, and the American Embargo, beneficial to the Political and Commercial Interests of Great Britain; Message of the President of the United States, communicated to Congress 5th Nov. 1811; Report in part of the Committee, to whom was referred that part of the President's Message which relates to Foreign Affairs; A View of the State of Parties in the United States of America; being an Attempt to account for the present Ascendancy of the French or Democratic Party in that Country, in two Letters to a Friend, 1-34. Author: John Barrow, with William Gifford, John Wilson Croker, Frederick John Robinson, and George Canning; suggested by John Murray.

Running Title: America—Orders in Council, &c.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Barrow and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see also Smiles I 201. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [7 Dec. 1811]: [notation on the letter in JM II's hand:  'About an article on American affair of Lille Belt suggested by J.M.'] '... I sent to Mr Cr[oker] as I promised.  Mr C[anning] has written G[eorge] E[llis] and I think we may expect something there ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [1812]: 'I will not close my eyes till the whole of America is finished .... Our friend B[arrow] proves a tougher piece of work than I expected. ... I find some difficulty to preserve the chain of the argument clear & unbroken.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [21 Mar. 1812; notation on letter: 'Article on America B— W—']: 'I am glad to receive the slips & shall send them to B tomorrow.'

Some of the following evidence was first published in VPR 28; additional evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: one of the pamphlets reviewed was sent to 'Geo. Ellis' on 13 May 1809.  Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812:  'The Orders in Council were written at the Admiralty, & chiefly by my friend Barrow—Croker & Robinson lent their aid, and Canning was kind enough to give me two or three hours revisal of them.' The Robinson mentioned is almost certainly John Frederick Robinson, Viscount Goderich, who was at this time an Admiralty Lord. Other possibilities are less likely because WG assumes Copleston's familiarity with the name and these other men are too obscure: William Robinson, Extra Clerk in the Marine Pay Department and Christopher Robinson (1766-1823), a Tory MP 1818-20, King's Advocate from 1809, who became a judge of high court of Admiralty in 1828. Murray MS., JM to John Bristed, New York, 12 Dec. 1811, says that he is interested in obtaining articles from Bristed on 'the real state of the parties in America' and on other American matters of interest to the British.

The Orders in Council were drafted by James Stephen, a friend of Prime Minister Preceval and a key member of the Saints (Evangelical parliamentarians and philanthropists under the leadership of William Wilberforce, later known as the Clapham Sect). The Saints were important early supporters of the QR.

The Orders in Council were the subject of ER #610, July 1812, by James Loch and Francis Jeffrey.

[Booksellers' notes, modified: 'Orders in Council of Jan. 7 and Nov. 11, 1807 aimed at strangling neutral commerce, the United States being the chief target; the orders were repealed but too late to prevent the War of 1812.' 'On taking office Madison had repealed Jefferson's embargo on European commerce and installed his own policy that there would be "non-intercourse" with England or France until they repealed their own non-trading policies. In 1809 Macon's Bill No. 2 was passed. This restored trading with England and France but promised that if either would recognize America's neutral stand then America would stop trade with the other. As of 2 November 1810 Napoleon had announced that he had revoked his "antineutral system and [it was determined] that non-intercourse would be revived against Britain, if in three months' time she did not repeal her orders in council." (Morison "Oxford History" p. 378) France did in fact not stop its "antineutral" practices but Madison felt that he had given the country's pledge and on 2 March 1811 intercourse with Britain was banned under the Macon Act. England suffered under this as Napoleon had cut off many of their other markets and the winter of 1811 to 1812 was the bitterest "between the Great Plague and 1940/1." 16 June 1812 Castlereagh rescinded the Orders in Council; two days later, not having heard of this decision, Congress declared war.']

JM II's marked QR:  'Barrow'. 

JM III's Register: queries its attribution to Barrow.


181 Article 2. Hodgson, The Life of the Right Reverend Beilby Porteus, D.D. late Bishop of London. Second edition. Prefixed to an Edition of Porteus's Works; The Life of Dr. Beilby Porteus, late Lord Bishop of London; with Anecdotes of those with whom he lived, and Memoirs of many living and deceased Characters. By a Lay-Member of Merton College, Oxford, 34-48. Author: George D'Oyly, probably; possibly with Thomas Dunham Whitaker.

Running Title: Life of Bishop Porteus.

Notes: In attributing the article to Thomas Dunham Whitaker, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [20 Apr. 1812]: 'I have red the proof from Whitaker ... he has not taste enough to strike out anything....' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the reference may be to #183.]

The following evidence was fist published in VPR 24. Murray MS., George D'Oyly to JM, 25 Oct. 1811, says he has received books on the Bishop of London. Porteus was a Cambridge man, which might have recommended him to the author of this article. D'Oyly was a professor at Cambridge. Whitaker was an Oxford graduate. Cf. the praise of Porteus's anti-Calvinism here with similar sentiments in #164, which is also by D'Oyly. The article is not attributed to Whitaker in Nichols. Whitaker mentions Porteus in #183 and #234.

Not, apparently, an Evangelical himself, Porteus was nevertheless an early Church of England supporter of Evangelical philanthropy and the great Evangelical societies, including the British and Foreign Bible Society, the Church Missionary Society, the Bettering Society, the Society for the Suppression of Vice, and the London Society for the Promotion of Christianity among the Jews.

JM II's marked QR:  [in pencil] 'Whittaker.'

JM III's Register: attribution to Whitaker, but without evidence.

Summary: Recommends bishop Porteus as a zealous pastor, a careful but not deep scholar, and an anti-Calvinist; he is in the second rank of greatness in the Church. The Society for the Suppression of Vice, though a worthy agent of social control, is open for abuse.


182 Article 3. Mackenzie, Travels in the Island of Iceland, in the Summer of the Year 1810; Hooker, Journal of a Tour in Iceland, in the Summer of 1809, 48-92. Author: Robert Southey.

Running Title: Travels in Iceland.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites Cottle 242-43 and Southey 577. Shine says to see also Warter II 251. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [20 Apr. 1812, numbered 192]: 'I send the remr of Southey....' BL MS. 30928 [no folio number given], Robert Southey to Charles Danvers, 9 May 1812: 'the next number [of QR] will contain a reviewal of the Iceland Traveler.' BL MS. 28603 [no folio number given], Southey to William Peachey, 6 Apr. 1825: 'The paper in QR no 13 upon some Travels in India is not mine .... There is a paper of mine upon Iceland in that number.' In suggesting John Barrow as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see also Smiles I 201. [Quarterly Review editor's note: article #182 is an example of the Shine volume rejecting JM III's Register in favour of primary source evidence, which is relevant as the Shine volume in very many instances accepts the Register without qualification when its attributions are not supported by evidence. It also illustrates that JM III's Register sometimes solely depends upon JM II's marked QR.]

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article is in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles.  Murray MS., Book Loans Register: one of the books reviewed in #182 was sent to 'R. Southey' on 4 Oct. 1811. Murray MS., Robert Southey to JM, 13 Dec. 1811, says he is working on 'Iceland.'  Murray MS., Southey to JM, 31 Jan. 1812, says he will submit 'Mackenzie' as soon as he can.  Murray MS., Southey to JM, 7 Mar. 1812, sends some of 'Iceland.' Article #182 is quoted in #368, by John Barrow. Note that the Hooker volume under review was published by 'Miller, Albemarle-street' and is therefore one of the last volumes printed by William Miller (1769-1844) who retired in 1812. In August 1812, John Murray purchased Miller's premises at 50 Albemarle and moved his business there in September; the building remained the headquarters of John Murray until 2002 and, as of this writing (June 2003), still houses the offices of John and Virginia Murray and the company's venerable archives. See Smiles I 233 ff. for details about the move to Albemarle Street. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #594, Feb. 1812, by James Playfair.

[Bookseller's note on Mackenzie: 'Mackenzie, a distinguished mineralogist and president of the physical class of the Royal Society, travelled to Iceland in 1810 in the company of Drs. Henry Holland and Richard Bright. The present work is the joint production of the three men, Mackenzie contributing the narrative of the voyage and travels, and the chapters on mineralogy, rural economy and commerce, Dr. Bright the sections on zoology and botany, and Dr. Holland the chapters on literature, diseases, and government, laws and religion. The mineralogical collections brought back from the expedition were spoken of with great admiration by Sir Charles Lyell. The fine hand-coloured aquatints of scenery and costume by J. Clark and text engravings and plates by R. Scott and E. Mitchell are based on original sketches by the three travellers, the majority drawn by Mackenzie.']

[Bookseller's note on Hooker, modified: 'Hooker, later director of Kew, visited Iceland to undertake botanical investigations on the advice of Sir Joseph Banks. All his collected specimens were lost when on the voyage home an arsonist set fire to the ship. Hooker vividly describes his escape from the burning ship. The book contains interesting sections on every branch of Icelandic natural history, including volcanoes and geysers, and a long appendix on "Odes and Letters presented by the Literati of Iceland to the Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Banks and the Hon. Capt. Jones."']

JM II's marked QR:  'Barrow'.

JM III's Register:  'J Barrow' and note:  'Southey wrote in this No See W G's letter 182'.


183 Article 4. Lingard, The Antiquities of the Saxon Church, 92-107. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker.

Running Title: Antiquities of the Saxon Church.

Notes: In attributing the article to Whitaker, Shine cites only Nichols xxix. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr Whitaker' on 19 Dec. 1810 and (again?) on 10 Jan. 1811. Murray MS., Thomas Dunham Whitaker to JM, 11 Feb. 1811: speaks of preparing this article. Compare a statement at #229 page 433, an article by Whitaker, that Lingard, a Catholic priest, like Gibbon, uses history for polemic. The author attacks celibacy as unnatural and recommends latitude in matters of doctrine. Whitaker was an Evangelical clergyman in the Church of England.

[Bookseller's note: 'Lingard was an English Catholic parish priest. He wrote the first major Catholic history of England in the early 1800s; his work presents English history, particularly the Reformation, from the Catholic viewpoint.']

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #734, Oct. 1815, by John Allen.


184 Article 5. Cooke, History of the Reformation in Scotland; with an Introductory Book and an Appendix, 107-20. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker.

Running Title: Cooke's History of the Reformation in Scotland.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Walter Scott, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [Apr. 1812]: 'Nothing from Sunning Hill—nor from Scott.'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 24. Murray MS., Thomas Dunham Whitaker to JM, 11 Feb. 1811, asks to be sent this book for the next Number of the Review.  Murray MS., Book Loans Register:  the book reviewed was returned by 'Revd. Dr Whitaker' on 15 Nov. 1820. John Murray was the London publisher of the book under review.

JM III's Register: '? Sir W Scott' [in pencil] and with the following note in pencil: 'This suggestion is derived from Gifford's letter to Scott, lent to me by D Douglas July 1893.'


185 Article 6. Haafner, Voyages dans la Peninsule Occidentale de l'Inde, et dans l'Ile de Ceylan, 120-36. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Haafner's Travels in India.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see also Smiles I 201. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [Apr. 1812]: 'Barrow ... wishes much for an Article on India ....'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article is referred to in #228, which is also by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works.' Ceylon is spelled in the article's head note as above.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, and with the following note: 'See W G's letter Mar 14 / 12.'


186 Article 7. Traité Elémentaire d'Astronomie Physique, par J. B. Biot, Membre de l'Institut de France, &c. Avec des Additions relatives à l'Astronomie Nautique, par M. de Rossel, ancien Capitaine de Vaisseau, Rédacteur et Co-opérateur du Voyage de d'Entrecasteaux. Seconde Edition, destinée à l'Enseignement dans les Lycées impériaux et les Ecoles secondaires .... An Elementary Treatise on Physical Astronomy, &c., 136-50. Author: Olinthus Gregory, with Thomas Young and Edward Copleston.

Running Title: Biot—Traité Elémentaire d'Astronomie Physique.

Notes: In attributing the article to Young, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr O. Gregory, Woolwich' on 8 Nov. 1811. Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812:  'I thank you for the correction of Biot. I put the article in the hands of a Cambridge man; but the error escaped him. I will transmit it to the writer.'  Thomas Young was associated with Cambridge. See also evidence at #73 and #103 where Gregory's and Young's role in the QR in relation to each other is demonstrated. As minor internal evidence, compare the first sentence of the last paragraph of this article—'We have now reached the end of our analysis ....'—with that of #103—'We have now reached the end of a task ....' Article #103 is also by Gregory. The article is not in Young's definitive manuscript list of his QR articles. In the letter cited above, WG clearly indicates that Young and Copleston sub-edited the article.

JM II's marked QR: [in pencil] 'Dr Young'.  

JM III's Register: attribution to Young, but without evidence.


187 Article 8. Grenville, Portugal. A Poem; in Two Parts, 151-59. Authors: John Wilson Croker and William Gifford.

Running Title: Portugal: A Poem.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 454. Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [Apr. 1812]: 'Barrow suggests something on Portugal for our next, but I know not whether he can get it done. Murray MS., WG to JM, [24 Apr. 1812]: 'I send you Mr C cut down to a very pleasant article.'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May, 1812:  'Lord ^Nugent Grenville ... I only put together.  Croker read the book over, & with it, sent me much of the matter.'  Murray MS., WG to JM, [24 Apr. 1812]:  'I send you Mr C cut down to a very pleasant article.'  Claimed by Croker in four of the Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge Library bound volumes of Croker's articles.

JM II's marked QR:  'Croker'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.


188 Article 9. Romilly, Observations on the Criminal Law of England, as it relates to Capital Punishments, and on the Mode in which it is administered, 159-79. Author: John Davison.

Running Title: Sir S. Romilly on the Criminal Law of England.

Notes: In attributing the article to Davison, Shine cites JM III's Register; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138; and DNB

The following information is published here for the first time. Reprinted in Davison's Works

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #593, Feb. 1812, by Henry Brougham.

JM III's Register: attribution to Davison, but without evidence.


189 Article 10. Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, a Romaunt. Cantos I and II, 180-200. Author: George Ellis.

Running Title: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, a Romaunt, by Lord Byron.

Notes: In attributing the article to Ellis, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 126 [claims the article for Ellis, but without evidence]; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 138; Graham 41; and CBEL III 192. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [Nov. 1811]:  'I like Lord B's letter, & will send it to G[eorge] E[llis] ... say as little as possible ... till we hear from Sunning Hill [George Ellis's residence].' Murray MS., WG to JM, [1812]:  '... Child Harold ... must not go without the extracts, for those Mr E expressly desires may be inserted.'

The following citation of JM II's marked QR is published here for the first time. The volume under review was published by John Murray.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #596, Feb. 1812, by Francis Jeffrey.

 JM II's marked QR:  'Geo Ellis'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Ellis, but without evidence. 


190 Article 11. Nicholl, The Judgment delivered Dec. 11,1809, by the Right Hon. Sir John Nicholl, Knt. LL.D. Official Principal of the Arches of Canterbury; upon the Admission of Articles exhibited in a Cause of Office prompted by Kemp against Wickes, Clerk, for refusing to bury an Infant Child of two of his Parishioners, who had been baptized by a Dissenting Minister; Daubney, A Respectful Examination of the Judgment, &c., in a Letter to Sir John Nicholl; Hutton, Remarks upon a Late Decision in the Court of Arches, &c., 201-23. Author: Henry Phillpotts.

Running Title: Sir J. Nicholl and Dr. Daubney, &c. on Lay Baptism.

Notes: In attributing the article to Phillpotts, Shine cites JM III's Register and Smiles I 201. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the books reviewed were sent to 'H. Phillpots' on 6 Mar. 1812. Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812: 'Mr Phillpotts' I flatter myself will do good.' Devon MS. 1149M (ff.109), WG to Copleston, 3 June 1812:  'I wrote to Mr Phillpotts on the completion of our No.' The following Notice appears on page 304 of Number 11 (which was published ca. 14 Oct. 1811): 'The Address of H. P. is mislaid.' Phillpotts, later Bishop of Exeter, was brought into the QR by Edward Copleston. In 1811 he was a rector at Durham. 

JM II's marked QR: 'Rev. Philpots now Bp of Exeter[; his] first contribution[;] introduced to QR by Coplestone'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Phillpotts, with the following note: 'The Bp of Exeter's first contribution to Q R, he was introduced by Coplestone' and cites JM II's marked QR.

Published @ RC

February 2005

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