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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 7 , NUMBER 14 (June 1812)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 13 Aug. 1812 [Courier advertisement, 14 Aug. 1812; BL MS. 34567 (Bliss correspondence), f. 305, Octavius Gilchrist to Philip Bliss, 14 Aug. 1812: Gilchrist received his copy of QR Number 14 that day]

  • This Number initially sold about 4300 of 5000 printed

  • In September 1812 Murray moved his offices from 32 Fleet Street to 50 Albemarle Street (See Smiles I 233 ff. for details about the move.) The following quotations and discussion are published here for the first time.

    By the way—you will find this house of Murray's not unpleasant—there is a good room, detached from the shop, which will at all times be open to you, & where you may transact any incidental business that might otherwise occasion you to extend your walk. [Harewood MS., William Gifford to George Canning, 4 Nov. 1812]

    When you come to town, you will find Murray settled in Albemarle St. His house is not an unpleasant lounge, and Canning & a few others have furnished a private room with the Morning Papers. It is a sort of Horse and cab, & in Parliament time, forms a convenient place of meeting. [BL MS. 28099, f.111, William Gifford to George Ellis, 7 Jan. 1813. ]

    Later in the decade, Murray's literary and political friends used as a retreat the expansive first floor drawing room over Murray's book store at 50 Albemarle (see Smiles I 264-65). But the 'convenient place of meeting' Gifford mentions in the quotations above is more likely the small ground floor waiting room in that venerable building. In the nineteenth century, Murray kept a book store in the ground floor room that faces the street; Gifford alludes to it and describes the 'good room' as separate from it. The small waiting room, tucked away at the end of the ground floor entrance hall, is a private intimate space. It has a fireplace and its own skylight, the latter made possible by the room being situated at the base of a shaft formed on three sides by Murray's building and on the fourth by a neighbouring building. The room is in that sense, then, as Gifford says, 'detached from the shop.' To gain access, one ascends a couple of steps; these circumstances and the room's intimate dimensions make the room resemble, one could fancy, 'a sort of Horse and cab.'

    Murray's waiting room, and later the drawing room, in this period fulfilled the function of a building that adjoined John Wright's Piccadilly book shop in the Canningites' Anti-Jacobin days.  To quote the DNB article on Wright: 'In 1797 Canning, John Hookham Frere, and others, projected the "Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner." They took a lease of 168 Piccadilly, the next house to Wright's, which was vacant on account of the failure of J. Owen, the publisher of Burke's pamphlets, and made over the house to Wright, reserving to themselves the first floor. By means of a door in the partition wall they passed from Wright's shop to the editorial room without attracting notice.'

  • Iowa MS., f. 103, JM to John Wilson Croker: 'When Mr G[ifford] calls upon you which he will about Broughams Speech for our next—I hope you will have the kindness to hint at the ludicrousness of Metaphysical & polemic divinity & of Religious subjects generally & at the necessity of catching Subjects & Books of public interest—of what use is the Review to any person unless it have great circulation.'

  • BL MS. 34567 (Bliss correspondence), f. 305, Octavius Gilchrist to Philip Bliss, 14 Aug. 1812: 'What I have seen of the present number of the Quarterly, I like;though it yet wants that bold and original march of argument which distinguished, more particularly, the early numbers of the Edinb[urgh]. Review.'

  • Parliament, that had been in session from 22 June 1807,  was prorogued 29 Sept. 1812

  • In June the United States declared war on Great Britain (See QR # 219)

  • Article #191 was written one year after Joseph Blanco White converted to Anglicanism

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #191, #197, #204

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 12

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 3

  • Number of articles for which no suggestion of authorship is made: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES



191 Article 1. Walton, Present State of the Spanish Colonies; including a particular Report of Hispaniola, or the Spanish Part of Santo Domingo; with a general Survey of the Settlements on the South Continent of America, as relates to the History, Trade, Population, Customs, Manners, &c. with a concise Statement of the Sentiments of the People on their relative Situation to the Mother Country, 235-64. Author: Joseph Blanco White, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Walton's Present State of the Spanish Colonies.

Notes: In attributing the article to White, Shine cites JM III's Register and Thom III 468. Shine says to see also Southey 280. Shine quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [4 July 1812, numbered 197]:  'I must add something to Blanco, to bring him down to the present day.'  Murray MS., WG to JM, [6 July 1812, numbered 198]:  'Blanco's second sheet I have not yet done with .... the language [of it]... is a Spaniards.' In suggesting William Jacob as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Curry II 38. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #549, Feb. 1811, by Sydney Smith.

JM II's marked QR:  [in pencil] 'Jacob'.

JM III's Register: attribution to William Jacob and with this note: 'Blanco White wrote in this art. See W G's letters Nos 197-98'.  


192 Article 2. Roscoe, A Letter to Henry Brougham, Esq. M.P. on the Subject of Reform in the Representation of the People in Parliament; Roscoe, An Answer to a Letter from Mr. John Merritt on the Subject of Parliamentary Reform, 265-81. Author: John William Ward, Lord Dudley.

Running Title: Roscoe's Letters on Reform.

Notes: In attributing the article to Dudley, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 202; QR LXVII 97; and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register:  the book reviewed was sent to 'Clement Park' (Lord Dudley's residence) on 11 Sept. [?1810].  Devon MS., WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812, suggests this as a topic for Lord Dudley.  Cf. #134, another review of Roscoe by Lord Dudley.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #605, July 1812, by Henry Brougham.

JM II's marked QR:  'Ld Dudley'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Dudley, but without evidence.  


193 Article 3. Biographia Dramatica; or a Companion to the Play-House, containing Historical and Critical memoirs, and original Anecdotes of British and Irish Dramatic Writers, from the Commencement of our Theatrical Exhibitions; among whom are some of the most celebrated Actors: also an Alphabetical Account, and Chronological Lists, of their Works, the Dates when printed, and Observations on their Merits: together with an introductory View of the Rise and Progress of the British Stage. Originally compiled, to the year 1764, by David Erskine Baker; continued thence to 1782 by Isaac Reed, F.S.A.; and brought down to the end of November, 1811, with very considerable Additions and Improvements throughout by Stephen Jones, 282-92. Author: Octavius Gilchrist, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Jones's Biographia Dramatica.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Gilchrist and Gifford, Shine cites DNB; Graham 41; Clark 194: 'much like Gifford's work .... There is a possibility that Gifford only added to Gilchrist's article.' Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [26 Feb. 1812]: 'Gilchrist ... is much pleased with the Art. in hand.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [possibly misdated 14 Mar. 1812]: 'Gilchrist has almost finished Jones <?> he says ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [6 Oct. 1812]: 'As to the Reply ... it is absolute perfection .... If there be a halter in Stamford we shall hear no more of poor Gilchrist .... Mr Barrow will frank a copy for you to Gilchrist.' Notation on letter: 'Jones's pamphlets on QR.' In suggesting William Gifford and Barron Field as an alternative co-attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., WG to Octavius Gilchrist, Monday [probably 3 Feb.] 1812, says he thinks Number 12 is just out and that Gilchrist's 'little Art. will be in excellent time.' Murray MS., WG to Octavius Gilchrist, 13-17 Feb. 1812: 'Can you make an Article, do you think, out of Jones?' Murray MS., WG to Octavius Gilchrist, [June or July 1812?]: 'I was obliged to cut down Jones. ... [I did] not put in a word of my own, except in the concluding paper.' The article was the occasion for Stephen Jones, Hypercriticism exposed: in a letter addressed to the readers of "The Quarterly Review," respecting an article in the XIVth number of that publication, professing to be an examen of Mr. Stephen Jones's edition of the "Biographia Dramatica," lately published. By a friend to candour and truth. (1812).

[Booksellers' notes, combined and silently modified: 'The Biographia Dramatica, an expansion of Baker's Companion to the Playhouse, originally compiled to the year 1764 by David Erskine Baker, was continued thence to 1782 by Isaac Reed, and brought down to the end of November 1811 by Stephen Jones (1763-1827).' 'Baker (1730-1767) trained as a scholar and mathematician until joining an itinerant group of actors. He published the first edition of this work, under the title of Companion to the Playhouse in 1764. The DNB notes that Baker "was largely indebted to his predecessor Langbaine. He adds but little information concerning the early dramatists, but his work is a useful book of reference for the history of the stage during the first half of the eighteenth century." The first part of the work contains a critical and historical account of every tragedy, comedy, and farce in the English language. The second part contains biographies of dramatic writers and actors in Great Britain.']

JM II's marked QR: [in pencil] 'Field but' [in pen] 'mainly Gifford'.

JM III's Register: states 'Barron Field but mainly W. Gifford', but without evidence.


194 Article 4. Eveleigh, Sermons on various Subjects, Doctrinal and Practical, preached before the University of Oxford, 293-97. Author: George D'Oyly.

Running Title: Dr. Eveleigh's Sermons. 

Notes: In querying its attribution to D'Oyly, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see also Smiles I 203. Shine quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [4 July 1812]: 'Whatever be the case, Eveleigh cannot be left out this time without displeasing Dr Ireland, who fully expects it.' Murray MS., WG to JM, 10 July [1812 postmark]: 'Eveleigh, I have cut down into a very unexceptionable article ....' In suggesting John Ireland as a queried alternative attribution, Shine cites exactly the same evidence as above.

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27; the citation of JM II's QR and the quotation from Murray MS., George D'Oyly to JM, 25 Oct. [1811] are the first primary evidence to be published that supports an attribution of #194 to D'Oyly. The volume was reviewed because Eveleigh was an associate of Edward Copleston; Copleston succeeded Eveleigh as Provost of Oriel College. Eveleigh was also a friend of John Ireland, Gifford's closest confidant. Both Smiles and Shine have created problems in the presentation of evidence that concerns #194. Smiles at I 203 quotes a fuller version of Murray MS. WG to JM, [4 July 1812] that demonstrates the tension between WG and JM in the admission of religious articles, this article in particular. Smiles interprets the letter as illustrating 'the influence over Gifford of his friend Dr. Ireland, which JM considered baneful.' But taking into account a wider range of evidence, it appears instead that JM objected equally to D'Oyly, the author of #194. JM had complained about D'Oyly's contributions before: after quoting from the 4 July 1812 letter, Smiles quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [n.d.], 'If you mean—by being no Calvinist that D'Oyly is not to come, I do not see how this can be—as we shall have an article from Mr. C. in the No. following. Nor can I frame excuses for your omissions. This business begins to get too heavy for me, and I must soon have done, I fear.' Shine may be correct in applying this undated letter instead to #164, as the reference in it to 'an article from Mr. C. in the No. following' may be to Edward Copletson's review of Ensor in #173. 

Devon MS. 1149M (f.88), WG to Edward Copleston, 13 Apr. 1811: 'I could wish for a short article ... on Dr Evely's vol of Sermons. Ireland wishes it too, but he loves the Dr. & hesitates to trust himself. I fear the same feeling may be with you—otherwise I shall venture to solicit a few pages.' Murray MS., George D'Oyly to JM, 25 Oct. [1811], asks for a copy of Eveleigh's sermons to review. 

Gifford at one point suggested to Edward Copleston that Eveleigh write for the QR.

JM II's marked QR: 'Rev Dr D Oyley'.

JM III's Register: attribution to D'Oyly, with the following note: '?Dr Ireland see W G July 4, 1812.' 


195 Article 5. Galt, Voyages and Travels in the Years 1809, 1810, 1811; containing Statistical, Commercial, and Miscellaneous Observations on Gibraltar, Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Serigo and Turkey, 297-308. Author: John Ferriar, probably.

Running Title: Galt's Voyages and Travels.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Ferriar, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Note the reference on p.301 to the 'opposition coaches which give such features of pleasantness to the run between Manchester and London. 'Ferriar was a Manchester doctor, well-known to the QR's editorial coterie. His essay on Massinger WG included in his edition of Massinger, and, an avid book collector and a friend of Richard Heber, he was author of Bibliomania: An Epistle to Richard Heber, Esq. (1809). Because of the subject matter, John Barrow's possible participation should be considered. The article is not in Barrow's style, however. Note the classical and literary allusions untypical of Barrow and the emphasis not on information but on criticism. Devon MS. 1149M (f.106), WG to Edward Copleston, 3 Mar. 1812, suggests this topic for Mr. Vaux. Ferriar's Essay towards a Theory of Apparitions was later reviewed at #246, by William Stewart Rose, a friend of Walter Scott's. The attribution to Ferriar cannot be considered definitive as no objective primary evidence has been discovered to support it. Lord Byron accompanied Galt during a part of Galt's travels.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #671, Apr. 1814, by Henry Brougham.

JM III's Register: [in pencil] '? Dr. Ferriar', but without evidence.


196 Article 6. Barbauld, Eighteen Hundred and Eleven. A Poem, 309-13. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Mrs. Barbauld's Eighteen Hundred and Eleven.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Graham 41; Clark 197, 271n28; and Brightfield 454. Shine says to see also Smiles I 202. Shine summarizes Iowa MS. (f.44), JM to John Wilson Croker, [pencil notation 1812]: 'Murray recommends mercy, instead of the sweeping severity in the closing paragraph of the article on Mrs Barbauld; except for those last sentences, he considers the article particularly lively and happy.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University Library bound volumes of Croker's articles. The letter that Shine summarizes (Iowa MS. f.44, JM to Croker) reads in full: 'Dear Sir / Will you pardon me if I venture to plead in mitigation of the sweeping severity of the last closing paragraph—Mrs Barbauld was the first who composed any rational books for children—her "Sir Bertrand" Essays on the "Folly of Inconstant Expectations" "On Education" on the Writings of Richardson & some other compositions, of more celebrity than extent, have placed her ^ so high in public respect & estimation that perhaps some mercy might be recommended in your summing up, after [pen scratches] a castigation so severe and just upon her assuming a character so opposite to her nature & talents— / I allude merely to the last sentences for all proceeding them are in my humble judgement, particularly lively and happy— / J. M.' Smiles in I 202 (cited in Shine) states, without evidence, that Croker had three articles in this Number.

JM II's marked QR: 'Croker'.

 JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.


197 Article 7. Reid, Memoirs of the Public Life of John Horne Tooke, Esq. Containing a particular Account of his Connections with the most eminent Characters of the Reign of George III. His Trials for Sedition, High Treason, &c. With his most celebrated Speeches in the House of Commons, on the Hustings, Letters, &c., 313-28. Author: John William Ward, Lord Dudley, probably with Richard Heber and Edward Copleston.

Running Title: Reid's Memoirs of the Public Life of John Horne Tooke. 

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Ward and Copleston, Shine cites JM III's Register and additional secondary sources that attribute the article to Ward alone: QR LXVII 97; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; Dudley-Ivy 113n; DNB. Shine says to see also Smiles I  218.

Most of following evidence was first published in VPR 28; some additional evidence is published here for the first time. Devon MS. 1149M (ff.107-8), WG to Edward Copleston, 23 May 1812, suggests this as a topic for Lord Dudley. Devon MS. 1149M (f.109), WG to Copleston, 3 June 1812, says John Davison told him that 'my anonymous friend has fixed upon Horne Tooke.' (Combined with other evidence, the Devon PRO MS. 1148M letters demonstrate that the 'anonymous friend' is Lord Dudley.) Devon MS. 1149M (ff.110-11), WG to Copleston, 5 Oct. 1812, strenuously denies knowing the name of this article's author let alone having revealed it. '[A]s far ^as I know, you are the only person in existence who is acquainted with his name. For this, I might appeal to my two most confidential friends, Canning and Ireland[,] who have heard me repeatedly declare that the writer of the Art. on Tooke was utterly unknown to me.' Marchand, Byron's Letters II 235, Byron to JM, 23 Oct. 1812: 'Did Mr. Ward write the review of H. Tooke's life?—it is excellent.' Smiles at I 218 (cited in Shine) quotes JM to Byron, 4 Nov. 1812: 'Neither Mr. Gifford nor I, I can venture to assure you, upon honour, have any notion who the author of the admirable article on "Horne Tooke" is.' The author of the review (or one of the authors) is old enough to have a remembrance of Tooke's political life (p.314) and to recall the events of 1794 (see p.328). Dudley was born in 1781, Heber in 1773, and Copleston in 1776. 

JM II's marked QR: 'Heber / Mr Ward / Ld Dudley / & / Coplestone'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Dudley and Copleston, but without evidence. 


198 Article 8. Edgeworth, Tales of Fashionable Life Vols. 4, 5, and 6, 329-42. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Miss Edgeworth's Tales of Fashionable Life.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 202; Graham 41; Brightfield 338, 454; Pfeiffer in PQ XI 101-3 and notes; and CBEL III 368. Shine says to see also Dudley 13-14. Shine quotes from the following letters. Iowa MS., JM to Croker, [n.d.]: '... perhaps you will make an effort upon Miss Edgeworth who merits all your care ... we used [her] very scurvily in our Review (see no 3 or Vol 2 p 146) of the first three Vols of her Tales ... I am very anxious for a good Article upon these Tales.' Murray MS., WG to JM, n.d.: 'I send Edgeworth which I have been able to look at ... we must not go too fast for ou[r fri]end.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1812]: 'Edgeworth I returned by the boy for press—having made no alteration of importance to it.' Iowa MS., JM to [Croker], n.d.: 'I send the close of the admirable article with which you have favoured us upon Miss Edgeworth & for which I feel greatly obliged.'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Smiles at I 202 (cited in Shine), concerning an article in this Number, quotes Croker to JM, 'I send you a hasty sketch, or rather vile daub, of a portrait of Miss Edgeworth.'  Iowa MS. (f. 103), JM to John Wilson Croker, [n.d., no watermark, but 1810]: requests that Croker review Edgeworth and expand the article into a discussion of 'Novel writing generally.' Iowa MS. (f.42), John Wilson Croker to JM, [1812], returns the close of Croker's 'admirable article' on Edgeworth. Claimed by Croker in five of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge Library bound volumes of Croker's articles. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #604, July 1812, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM II's marked QR: 'Croker'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.


199 Article 9. Mawe, Travels in the Interior of Brazil, particularly in the Gold and Diamond Districts of that Country, including a Voyage to the Rio de la Plata, 342-56. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Mawe's Travels in the Interior of Brazil.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 10 July [1812 postmark]: 'Mr B has sent the first part of Mawe ....'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article's author refers back to #170, which is also by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #613, Nov. 1812, by Sydney Smith.

[Bookseller's note, modified: 'The classic eyewitness account of the gold and diamond mines of Brazil, Mawe was the first foreigner given royal permission to visit the diamond- and gold-mining district. According to Borba de Moraes, the view of the Jaraguá mining camp is the first landscape document that exists of the interior of São Paulo. Plates show the washing of gold, a topaz mine, machines used in mining, the appearance of gold- or diamond-bearing ore, the crystalline structure of diamonds, topaz and tourmaline, and Brazilian shells.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow and with the following notes: 'See W G's letter July 10 / 12. Blanco White wrote in this art. See W G's letters Nos 197-198' [Shine comments: 'That second Addit. note confused White's South American article, Entry 191, with Barrow's.']


200 Article 10. Histoire des Républiques Italiennes du Moyen Age. Par J. C. L. Simonde Sismondi, 357-74. Author: John Herman Merivale, probably.

Running Title: Sismondi—Histoire des Républiques Italiennes.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Merivale, Shine cites JM III's Register and notes its citation of JM II's marked QR. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, 21 Aug. 1812: 'Mr Merivale, I believe, is out of town—however, they will tell you where to find him.'

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Devon MS. 1149M (f.105), WG to Edward Copleston, 4 Feb. 1812, suggests Sismondi as a subject for Copleston's friend (i.e., Lord Dudley). Devon MS. 1149M (ff.103-4), WG to Copleston, 12 Feb. 1812: 'I wrote to you a few days since respecting Sismondi, and strange to say, within these few minutes, I have recd an Article on him from the very person who had long since excused himself on the score of ill health!' The author adopts the form 'Henry the Seventh' (p.371), which Merivale does in at #222 (p.289; 'Louis the Fourteenth' ). Pg. 360n of #200 mentions Giovanni Villani, the subject of #256, which is also by Merivale. The first sentence of #256 refers back to this article which is also referred to at #283, an article whose authorship is not definitely established. Note H. H. Hallam's interest in Sismondi in Duke MS., H. H. Hallam to JM, 5 Sept 1817, where he recommends a friend's translation of 'the five concluding volumes of Mr. Sismondi's Italian republics.'  Sismondi is also mentioned by him in Duke MS. Hallam to JM, 15 Mar. 1820.  

JM II's marked QR: 'Q[UER]Y Merivale'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Merivale and cites JM II's marked QR.


201 Article 11. Moore, Irish Melodies, with Words, 374-82. Author: Horace Twiss, possibly.

Running Title: Moore's Irish Melodies.

Notes: In attributing the article to Twiss, Shine cites JM III's Register and Graham 41. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [20 Apr. 1812]: 'pray let one of your people leave the enclosed for Mr Moore at the Temple ....' Murray MS., WG to JM [6 July 1812]: 'Have the goodness to let one of your people take the inclosed to Mr Moore at the Temple.' In suggesting a queried attribution to Thomas Moore, Shine cites Sharpe II 27-38 that speculates 'written by himself, perhaps ....'

Note the discussion of women's literary interests on p.377.

JM II's marked QR: 'Horace Twiss'. 


202 Article 12. Hurd, The Works of the Right Rev. William Warburton, D.D. Lord Bishop of Gloucester. A New Edition. To which is prefixed, a Discourse by way of General Preface; containing some Account of the Life, Writings, and Character of the Author, 383-407. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker.

Running Title: Hurd's Edition of Bp. Warburton's Works.

Notes: In attributing the article to Whitaker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; Graham 41; and Nichols xxix. Shine also says to see QR VII 401. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [6 July 1812]: 'I have recd the end of Whitaker's art. but unluckily the part which he is labouring at, I suppose, the Descent of Aeneas into Hell, is not arrived; he promises it directly.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: there is no mention in the article of Aeneas.] 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Dr. Whitaker' on 26 Mar. 1811. Devon MS. 1149M (ff.110-11), WG to Edward Copleston, 5 Oct. 1812: 'You will be pleased to hear that the writer of the excellent Art. on Warburton is your old friend Dr Whitaker.' 

Warburton's Letters was reviewed in ER #444, Jan. 1809, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM II's marked QR: 'Rev. Dr Whittaker'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Whitaker, but without evidence.


203 Article 13. Carr, Descriptive Travels in the Southern and Eastern Parts of Spain and the Balearic Isles, in the Year 1809, 408-11. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Carr's Descriptive Travels in Spain.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 454. Shine says to see also Smiles I 202. [Smiles asserts, without evidence, that Croker had three articles in this Number.] 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University Library bound volumes of Croker's articles. 

 JM III's Register: attribution to Croker and cites unspecified letters.


204 Article 14. Biographie Moderne: Lives of remarkable Characters who have distinguished themselves from the Commencement of the French Revolution to the present time. From the French, 412-38. Author: Robert Southey.

Running Title: Lives of the French Revolutionists.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 202; Cottle 242-43; and Southey 286, 577. Shine says to see also Southey 283, 284, 285 and Warter II 251. Shine quotes from BL MS., 30928 [no folio number given], Robert Southey to Charles Danvers, 4 June 1812: 'I shall finish the Register by the end of next week, & shall require a fortnight after it for the Quarterly. Then I am ready to strap on my knapsack & start ....'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article is in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. Ramos 125.

 JM III's Register: attribution to Southey, citing unspecified letters.


205 Article 15. Robert William Spencer, Poems, 438-40 Author not identified.  

Running Title: Spencer's Poems.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. Shine quotes from  Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1812]: 'Spenser—I am sorry to say—I am almost afraid of. It is but feeble & will do us little good—However, I will look at it again.' 'Spencer' is incorrectly spelled 'Spenser' in Shine's transcription of the running title and perhaps also in their transcription of the Murray letter.


206 Article 16. Markland, Euripidis Supplices Mulieres, Iphigenia in Aulide, et in Tauris, cum Notis Jer. Marklandi integris, et aliorum selectis. Accedunt de Grœcorum quinta Declinatione imparisyllabica, et inde formata Latinorum tertia, Quœstio Grammatica, Explicationes veterum aliquot Auctorum, Epistolœ quœdam ad D'Orvillium datœ, cum Indicibus necessariis, 441-64. Author: Peter Elmsley.

Running Title: Markland's Euripidis Supplices, &c.

Notes: In attributing the article to Elmsley, Shine cites JM III's Register and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1812]: 'Greek, I think, must come last as Elmsley says that he has an addition to make.' Shine comments: 'A year later, when Elmsley applied for permission to reprint his essay, Gifford wrote the following polite refusal, which he suggested that Murray should copy and send.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [7 July 1813]: 'I should have pleasure in complying with your [Elmsley's] wishes respecting the Article in the fourteenth No of the Q Review ... but ... I ... fear to afford a precedent which might lead to unforseen consequences.' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Peter Elmsley to JM, 25 June 1813, proposes publishing a pamphlet based on his Greek article in QR Number 14. Murray MS., Elmsley to JM, 11 July 1813, having been refused permission to do so declares he will no longer write for the journal. An Appendix that follows #220 in issue Number 15 supplies corrections to #206. Article #220 is also by Elmsley.

JM II's marked QR:  'Elmsley'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Elmsley, but without evidence. 

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