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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 10, NUMBER 20 (January 1814)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 1 Apr. 1814 [Murray MS., green Letter Book, Mdme de Staël to JM, 2 Apr. 1814 (copy), annotation in JM II's hand: 'to me upon the Criticism on L'Allemagne which appeared in my review No XX published the day before'. Courier advertisement, 25 Mar. 1814, announces the journal's appearance for the 28th]

  • The Courier advertisement of 25 Mar. 1814 lists the articles for this Number, but not in the order as printed. Article #277, (article 6 in this Number), is listed in the advertisement as article 8; #278, article 7 in this Number, is listed in the advertisement as article 6; #279, article 8 in this number is listed as article 7.

  • This Number initially sold about 6000

  • The winter of 1814-15 was one of the coldest in London on record with January to March being exceptionally cold. The tidal Thames froze over from late January to early February; shipping and travel were severely disrupted by heavy fog, frost, and snow. See the interesting Internet page on nineteenth-century weather  

  • Items for 1814 from Jack Lynch's literary resources page, with additions:

    • Allied armies invade France from the north, south and east, inciting Bourbon sentiment as they traverse the country. Napoleon fights a series of brilliant counter-attacks but, by March, Paris has fallen.
    • April: Napoleon abdicates and, through the efforts of Talleyrand, is succeeded by Louis XVIII. Napoleon is exiled to the Italian island of Elba (see QR #321).
    • The great European powers meet for the Congress of Vienna (September 1814-June 1815) and agree upon a conservative and monarchist world order.
    • British forces attack Washington D.C., burning the White House and Capitol. American forces under Jackson are victorious at New Orleans. The "War of 1812" is concluded by the Treaty of Ghent.
    • English Corn Laws passed in Parliament. These protectionist laws encouraged the export and limited the import of corn when prices fell below a fixed point, later becoming the object of a fierce political struggle between the landowning and industrialist classes.
    • The British navy develops the first steam-driven warship.
    • George Watson invents the steam locomotive.
    • Legh Richmond publishes influential religous tract 'Annals of the Poor'.
    • Founding of the New Monthly Magazine.
    • Austen publishes Mansfield Park; Byron, The Corsair (see QR #308); Scott, Waverley (see QR #304); Wordsworth, The Excursion (see QR #315).

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #274, #275, #277, #281, #282

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 11

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: none

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


272. Article 1. Edgeworth, Patronage, 301-22. Author: John William Ward, Lord Dudley, with Edward Copleston. 

Running Title: Miss Edgeworth's Patronage.

Notes: In attributing the article to Lord Dudley, Shine cites JM III's Register; Dudley-Ivy 170, 170n, 250; QR LXVII 90n, 97; Romilly-Edgeworth 39; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; Graham 41; and Dudley 8-9, 10, 13-14, 25. In suggesting John Wilson Croker as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Pfeiffer in PQ XI 102-3, 103n. Shine also states: 'However, we recently examined the Brewer MS letter upon which Pfeiffer bases his statement. That MS letter's further allusions to Brougham and to Sir Robert Wilson convince us that it was written some years after the appearance of the 1814 review of Patronage.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article is claimed by John Wilson Croker in five of his Clements Library MS. lists and it is included in the Cambridge Library bound volumes of Croker's articles. However, a query by an unknown hand is entered beside the contents page title to the Cambridge bound volumes. Note that Croker was also mistaken about his having reviewed Edgeworth's Tales (#42). At the time he compiled his lists (in the 1840s) he seems to have misremembered having written all of the Edgeworth reviews in the QR

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #666, Jan. 1814, by Charles Kinnaird and Francis Jeffrey.

JM II's marked QR: 'Hon G Ward Ld Dudley' [sic].

JM III's Register: attribution to Ward, but without evidence. 


273. Article 2. Broughton, Letters written in a Mahratta Camp, during the Year 1809, descriptive of the Character, Manners, Domestic Habits, and Religious Ceremonies of the Mahrattas. With Ten coloured Engravings, from Drawings by a Native Artist, 323-31. Author: John Barrow, with William Gifford. 

Running Title: Broughton's Letters from a Mahratta Camp.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Barrow and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register and quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM Murray MS., WG to JM, [25 Mar. 1813]: 'B's India ... I have softened it; but as Barrow means to print it under his own ... name, there is no reason why he may not say what we cannot venture to do. I have therefore preserved his own proof for him ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1814] : 'I have now made the Maharattas a very readable article—it was a good deal confused at first.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [22 Mar. 1814]: 'I had taken great pains yesterday with this India Art. which is loosely written (as to style I mean) though full of good facts.'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 24 May 1813: justifies his discussion of missionaries in the 'Mahratta' article. The volume under review was published by John Murray. Note that Barrow did not, as suggested in Murray MS., WG to JM, [25 Mar. 1813], quoted in Shine, publish a version of this article. John Murray published the volume under review.

[Bookseller's note: 'Broughton first arrived in India in 1795 as a cadet in the Bengal establishment. Following the siege of Seringapatam in 1799, in which he was actively engaged, he was appointed commandant of the cadet corps. At the time he wrote the present work he was military resident with the Mahrattas. His book is dedicated to the Marquis of Wellesley.']

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #648, Oct. 1813, by Sydney Smith.  

JM II's marked QR: [pencil] 'Barrow'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, citing JM II's marked QR, and with the following note: 'much edited by Gifford.' 


274. Article 3. Giaour, a Fragment of a Turkish Tale and Bride of Abydos, a Turkish Tale. By Lord Byron. Eleventh Edition.—The Bride of Abydos, a Turkish Tale. By Lord Byron. Seventh Edition. 331-54. Author: George Ellis

Running Title: Lord Byron's Giaour, and Bride of Abydos. 

Notes: In attributing the article to Ellis, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 126; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; Graham 41; and CBEL III 193-94. Shine says to see also Smiles I 221. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1814]: '... Giaour will require so little alteration as to occasion no delay ... the proof will arrive from Sunning Hill [Ellis's residence] ... I have desired to Mr E to lose no time in his revise ....' 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time.  BL MS. 28099 (f.115), WG to George Ellis, 30 June 1813 [5 July 1813 postmark]: 'I had some thoughts of asking you to say a few words on the Giaour. You pleased Lord Byron mightily before ....' (See #189.) The volume under review was published by John Murray.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #635, July 1813, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM III's Register: attribution to Ellis, but without evidence.


275. Article 4. Madame de Staël, De l'Allemagne, 355-409. Author: Reginald Heber

Running Title: Madame de Staël Holstein's De l'Allemagne.

Notes: In attributing the article to Heber, Shine cites JM III's Register; Heber I 396, 396n; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; and says to see also Smiles I 314. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1814]: 'This moment I have rec'd the whole of Mad. de Stael from Mr Reg. H. ....' 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Heber I 418: Reginald Heber to Robert Wilmot, 20 Apr. 1814, claims review of de Staël in QR. The first London edition of the volume under review was published by John Murray.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #656, Oct. 1813, by James Mackintosh.

JM II's marked QR: 'Rev. R. Heber'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Heber, but without evidence.


276. Article 5. Butler, Some Account of the Life and Writings of James Bossuet, Bishop of Meaux; Butler, Life of Fenelon, Archbishop of Cambray, 409-27. Author: Thomas Dunham Whitaker

Running Title: Butler's Lives of Bossuet and Fenelon.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Robert Southey, Shine follows JM III's Register. Shine also cites Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139 and Southey. In suggesting Thomas Dunham Whitaker as a queried alternative attribution, Shine cites the note in JM III's Register (see below). 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 24. Murray MS., Thomas Dunham Whitaker to JM, 11 Sept. 1813, offers to review Butler's Bossuet. Murray MS., Whitaker to JM, 20 Dec. 1813, says he has not yet received the proofs of 'Fenelon' and 'Bossuet.' Ramos 132: Southey says, 'nothing of mine in the last Quarterly.'

JM III's Register: R. Southey' and note: '? by Dr Whitaker—see his letter of Oct 27, 1813'. 


277. Article 6. Zur Farbenlehre. On the Doctrine of Colours. By Goethe; with sixteen coloured Plates in 4to, 427-41. Author: Thomas Young.  

Running Title: Goethe on Colours.

Notes: In attributing the article to Young, Shine cites JM III's Register; Brande XXVIII 157; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 139; and Pettigrew IV 21. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article appears in Young's definitive MS. list of his QR articles published in Gurney. BL MS. 28099 f.105, WG to George Ellis, [9?] Dec. 1813, Young will show Ellis 'a very extraordinary article' [evidently by Young himself]. The reference is probably to #271. 

Goethe on colours was the subject of a much later review by Sir David Brewster, ER #1743, Oct. 1840.

JM III's Register: attribution to Young, but without evidence.


278. Article 7. ΕΡMΗΣ δ ΛΟΓΙΟΣ Η ΦΙΛΟΛΟΓΙΚΑΙ ΑΓΓΕΛΙΑΙ πεgιοδοζ Α. εν βιεννηι, 442-63. Author: Stratford Canning.

Running Title: Hermes—State of the Modern Greeks.

Notes: In attributing the article to Thomas Dunham Whitaker, Shine cites JM III's Register and quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1814],  '... Whitaker on Greece.' In querying Stratford Canning as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Murray MS,. Stanley Lane Poole to JM III, 14 June [1887]: 'I have a letter from George Canning to his cousin, Stratford, in which he says, "I return your proof . . . it will do you good in Giff's credit"—dated 20 Feb 1814. The proof appears to have dealt with matters of style and grammar for G C criticises some of Stratford's remarks about "aorists and paulas" & "the explosion of the dual number." Can this be a Quarterly Review article?' Notation on letter in JM III's hand: 'Ansd 15/IV/87, 1st quotn evidently refers to No 20 Art 7.'

Some of the following evidence was first published in VPR 28; some is published here for the first time. The attribution in JM III's Register to Whitaker is suspect as this article does not appear in Nichols's mostly reliable list of Whitaker's articles. Also, current events and Greek language are novel and unlikely subjects for Whitaker. In the light of Murray MS., Poole to JM 14 June [1887], a passage on p. 447 of the article demonstrates that the article is by Canning: 'The use of the dual number is exploded. All the nice distinctions so laboriously arranged by the ancient grammarians, the delicate shades of first and second future, the paulo post futurum, first and second aorist, the participles, &c. &c. are entirely obliterated.' Compare Murray MS., Cash Day Book 1810-12, p. 40 dated Tuesday 11 May 1813, 'Quarterly Review Dr [i.e., debit] / 1 copy 8 vols. 8 vo. for < ? > / to S. Canning Esq.'

JM III's Register: attribution to Whitaker, citing unspecified letters. 


279. Article 8. Lay of the Scottish Fiddle. A Poem. In Five Cantos. Supposed to be written by W— S—, Esq. First American, from the Fourth Edinburgh Edition, 463-67. Author: John Wilson Croker

Running Title: Lay of the Scottish Fiddle.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 454. Shine says to see also Smiles I 244 and Grierson III 395-96. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [19 Jan. 1814]: 'I will see in the morning what can be done with the Lay—Omission of some parts of it, perhaps.'   

The following evidence is published here for the first time Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge Library bound volumes of Croker's articles.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, citing unspecified letters. 


280. Article 9. Resolutions of a General Meeting of the Committee of Ship-Owners for the Port of London, held the 9th April, 1812; Various Returns of Thames and Indian-built Shipping, Prize Ships, &c, Ordered by the House of Commons to be Printed in the Session 1813, 467-81. Author: John Barrow

Running Title: Resolutions—of the London Ship Owners.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following evidence in favour of Barrow's authorship first appeared in VPR 27. Public Record Office (Kew), ADM 1 / 4368 miscellaneous papers of the Secretaries of the Admiralty [Croker and Barrow], f. 198: Exposition of Facts In support of an adequate duty to be imposed on India-Built Shipping, for the protection of the British Manufacturers of Ships [pamphlet dated London 10 June 1813]. See #260. The article's author alludes to #260, an article by Barrow. Article #280 is mentioned at #287 and possibly at #704, both of which are by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. The article is one in a series by Barrow on the subject of dry rot. The series includes #208, #245, #260, #280, #297, #320, #328, #541, #704, and #341WI.


281. Article 10. Dépêches et Lettres interceptées, &c. Copies of the Original Letters and Dispatches of the Generals, Ministers, Grand Officers of State, &c. at Paris, to the Emperor Napoleon, at Dresden; intercepted by the advanced Troops of the Allies in the North of Germany, 481-94. Author: John Wilson Croker

Running Title: Intercepted Letters, &c.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 454. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [19 Jan. 1814]: 'I have read the Intercepted Art ... what will be said of the politicks of it? .... If Peace be made it must be softened. We shall see what Mr Croker will do ....' Murray MS., WG to JM [7 o'clock, Friday evening, 22 Mar. 1814]: 'I hope Mr Croker has not left in anything about the Bourbons at this critical time.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [25 Mar. 1814]: 'About 11 last night Mr C sent his Art. It must be docked, that is, the last part, which is the only heavy part, taken off—but I will set to work immediately.' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge Library bound volumes of Croker's articles. Iowa MS. (f.97),  WG to JM, 25 March [1814]: 'By some unlucky accident the letter which I sent to Mr Croker this morning has, but just reached him & I am sorry to say that he objects to what I have omitted, being left out. I know not what to do; but I could wish to see you if possible as it may be still necessary to stop Rowarth [the printer], as I will not disoblige Mr Croker. I have written an explanatory note, and wait for his answer to be provided by it. Advise me what to do with Rowarth [.]' 

JM II's marked QR: [pencil] 'Q[UER]Y Croker'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker citing unspecified letters. 


282. Article 11. Ingersoll, Inchiquen, the Jesuit's Letters, during a late Residence in the United States of America; being a Fragment of a Private Correspondence, accidentally discovered in Europe, containing a favourable View of the Manners, Literature, and State of Society, of the United States; and a Refutation of many of the Aspersions cast upon this Country, by former Residents and Tourists. By some Unknown Foreigner, 494-530. Author: John Barrow

Running Title: Inchiquen's Favourable View of the United States.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and Graham 10. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [8 Mar. 1814]: 'send me the second sheet of America ... this [copy] I have scratched on.' Shine offers alternative attributions to each of William Gifford (from Tichnor I 58); to Robert Southey (from British Library catalogue entry number 1431 c. 19); and to Basil Hall (from Graham in PQ II 101, 101n). But the evidence to support these suggestions is weak. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article's author refers back to #219 (specific reference to p.193), which is also by Barrow. The article is referred to at #297, #282, and #468 (specific reference), all of which are by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. The article was the occasion for [Timothy Dwight], Remarks on the Review of Inchiquin's Letters, Published in the Quarterly Review; Addressed to the Right Honourable George Canning, Esquire. By an Inhabitant of New-England (1815). 

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, and note: 'From 5 letters of J B. Nov. 1813 wh shew that he was then engaged on an article on America for QR.' 

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February 2005

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