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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 14 , NUMBER 28 (January 1816)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 18 May 1816 [Courier advertisement, 18 May 1816]

  • This Number initially sold about 8000

  • Reginald and Richard Heber's brother Tom died 27 Mar. 1816. The event led to the delay of #386 that had been slated for this Number

  • News of the great Tambora volcanic eruption in Indonesia that occurred in April 1815 reached London via a report in The Times in November. Fallout from the eruption exacerbated already difficult climate conditions in Europe that had begun in 1814; the winter of 1814-15 was severe; 1816 came to be known as the 'year without a summer.' The cold wet weather is said to have indirectly inspired Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; the startling sunsets caused by volcanic dust in the upper atmosphere are pictured in Turner's landscapes. Useful Internet links include a page on nineteenth-century weather records and a page on the Tambora volcano

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #366, #368, #372, #373, #374, #377

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 11

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


366 Article 1. Culloden Papers: comprising an extensive and interesting Correspondence from the Year 1625 to 1748; including numerous Letters from the unfortunate Lord Lovat, and other distinguished Persons of the Time; with occasional State Papers of much historical Importance. The whole published from the Originals in the Possession of Duncan George Forbes, of Culloden, Esq. To which is prefixed, an Introduction, containing Memoirs of the Right Honourable Duncan Forbes, many Years Lord President of the Court of Session in Scotland. Illustrated by Engravings, 283-333. Author: Walter Scott.

Running Title: Culloden Papers.

Notes: In attributing the article to Scott, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 290; Grierson IV 167, 167n; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 140; Scott; and Douglas I 356. Shine says to see also Smiles I 287, 289-90 and Grierson IV 168, X 198, 198n. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Reprinted in Scott's Miscellaneous Prose (the collection was not, however, edited by Scott). NLS MS. 3887 (f.17), WG to Walter Scott, 6 Mar. 1816: 'It is with feelings of peculiar pleasure that I see you once more in the lists.... I thank you for both the Arts. [#369 and #366] The last ... stands ... at the head of our 28th ....'  NLS MS. 866 (ff.89-90), JM to Scott, 12 Apr. 1816: 'I trust you will oblige us with James'. James IV's relations with Scotland are treated in this article. Scott to JM, 25 Jan. 1816, quoted in Smiles I 289, refers to his long article on the Highlands.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #749, Feb. 1816, by Henry Cockburn.

JM II's marked QR: 'Scott'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Scott, but without evidence.


367 Article 2. Vita di Vittorio Alfieri, &c. Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Victor Alfieri, written by himself; The Tragedies of Vittorio Alfieri, translated by Charles Lloyd, 333-68. Author: Robert Southey.

Running Title: Alfieri's Life and Writings.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites JM III's Register; Cottle 242-43; Southey 577; and CBEL III 238. Shine says to see also Warter II 14-15, III 394. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article appears in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. Charles Lloyd, the translator, was a friend of Lamb and Coleridge. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Southey, but without evidence. 


368 Article 3. Humboldt, Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of the New Continent, during the Years 1799-1804, 368-402. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: De Humboldt's Travels.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and Gentleman's Magazine XXXI 140. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. BL MS. 34611 (f.363), John Barrow to Macvey Napier, 14 Mar. 1816: '... I have engaged to give my friend Gifford a heavy article for the next review.' By length, this is the most substantial of the three articles in this Number attributable to Barrow. On page 369, the article's author refers back to #345 (specific reference to page 323), which is also by Barrow. The article is referred to in #394, #446, #505, and #590, all of which are by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #725, June 1815, by John Leslie.

JM II's marked QR: 'Barrow'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 

Sample:  'There are two ways of reviewing M. de Humboldt's book; the analytical, which, by excluding the superfluous matter, would lay bare a skeleton composed of but scanty and meagre materials . . .; and the synthetical, if we may be allowed that term to express the collecting together his general views and opinions . . . . We prefer the latter, as being less dry, and possessing moreover the advantage of displaying the author's manner of treating a subject, as well as the matter of it . . . .'


369 Article 4. Polwhele, The Fair Isabel of Cotchele. A Cornish Romance: in six Cantos, 402-5. Author: Walter Scott.

Running Title: The Fair Isabel of Cotchele.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Scott, Shine follows JM III's Register. Shine also cites Smiles I 290 and Graham 41, and says to see also Grierson II 81-82, 397, 422-23, and Smiles I 290-91. 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 28. NLS MS. 3879 (f.262), WG to Walter Scott, 22 Nov. 1810, proposes that Scott review this book. See evidence at #366. Scott to JM, 15 Oct. [n.y.], quoted in Smiles I 290, offers to review 'Polwhele's works'.

JM III's Register: '? Sir W Scott' and note: 'See a letter from Sir W S to J M (undated).'

Sample: The essay begins: 'The valuable manuscript of the poem before us was inclosed, it seems, in a bureau of Mr. Walter Scott, which was "for some time inaccessible." . . . The key, however, was at length luckily found, or a blacksmith procured; and the Cornish Romance emerged from the obscurity of its seclusion. . . . In the drawer of this mystic cabinet were some papers belonging to Mr. Scott himself . . . .'


370 Article 5. Beckmann, A History of Inventions and Discoveries, 405-29. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Beckmann's A History of Inventions

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. The article was promised in #353, which is by Barrow. The volume under review is 'not a complete history of technology but, rather, an admirable collection of historical descriptions of individual inventions. For sources [Beckman] used primarily literary material, and his excellent philological and good technological knowledge served him well'. (Dictionary of Scientific Biography

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


371 Article 6. Alison, Sermons Vol. II, 429-43. Author: William Rowe Lyall.

Running Title: Alison's Sermons.

Notes: In attributing the article to Lyall, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'Wm Lyall' on 12 Dec. 1815. Note author's use of italics and repeated use of the phrases 'we do not,' 'we would not,' 'we are not,' 'having thus,' all characteristics of Lyall's writing. Note the author's evangelical tone and argument (though Lyall did not belong to the Evangelical party per se). 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #690 Sept. 1814, by Francis Jeffrey.

John R. Griffin in 'John Keble and the Quarterly Review,' Review of English Studies 29 (Nov. 1978), 454-55 and in John Keble, Saint of Anglicanism (1987) misattributes this article to John Keble. Griffin's error arises from a misreading of letters of John Keble to John Taylor Coleridge preserved in the Bodleian Library (MS. Eng. lett. d.134). 

JM III's Register: attribution to Lyall, but without evidence.


372 Article 7. Hobhouse, The Substance of some Letters written by an Englishman resident at Paris during the last reign of Napoleon. With an Appendix of Official Documents, 443-52. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Letters from Paris.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register, Broughton I 342, 342n; Brightfield 454; and Clark 198. Shine also quotes from Iowa MS., JM to John Wilson Croker, n.d. [Shine's summary]: 'Murray urging Croker to write a severe article against Beloe, says: Let it be like Hobhouse, a thing to remain in all times and to be quoted.'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. Hobhouse recounted the Hundred Days, Napoleon's return from exile on Elba. Croker expresses the view that Hobhouse's attack on the Bourbon dynasty is an infamous libel. Hobhouse was a friend to Lord Byron and was an executor of his will. The French government suppressed the French translation of Hobhouse's book and imprisoned the book's printer and translator. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #753, Feb. 1816, by Douglas Kinnaird.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.


373 Article 8. The Narrative of Robert Adams, a Sailor, who was wrecked in the Year 1810, on the Western Coast of Africa, was detained three Years in Slavery by the Arabs of the Great Desert, and resided several Months of that Period in the City of Tombuctoo; with a Map, Notes, and an Appendix, 453-75. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Tombuctoo.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The author's discussion of the Niger River and Lake Wangara and his argument that it connects with the Nile (pp.469-71), is identical to Barrow's in #337 (pp.140-51), #410 (pp.317-19), #457 (pp.347-49), and #544 (passim). The article is one in a series by Barrow in which he judges the veracity of a travel narrative, in this case favourably. Cf. #383, on a similar topic.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #763, June 1816, by an unidentified author.

[Bookseller's note adapted, with quotation from Huntress: 'Adams was from Hudson, New York and shipped out on the Charles in June 1810, bound for Gibraltar. After discharging cargo there, the crew proceeded to the African coast to trade. "Like so many other ships, the Charles was caught in unknown currents and was carried ashore about 400 miles north of Senegal on October 11, 1810. The whole crew reached shore, but all were made slaves by the Arabs, and the captain and mate killed. Adams was taken far to the eastward and visited Timbuctoo on a trading expedition; he may have been only the second or third European or American to describe that city. He was transferred from owner to owner, and at last reached Mogadore where he was ransomed by Mr. Dupuis, the British Consul there. He was sent to Cadiz and then London, where he told his story to the editor of this book."']

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


374 Article 9. Hunt, The Story of Rimini, a Poem, 473-81. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Leigh Hunt's Rimini.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Graham 41; Clark 197-98, 212-13; and Brightfield 454. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in five of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #765, June 1816, by William Hazlitt and Francis Jeffrey.

 JM II's marked QR: 'Croker'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence. 


375 Article 10. De Pradt, Du Congrès de Vienne, 481-505. Author: Robert William Hay.

Running Title: De Pradt's Congrès de Vienne.

Notes: In attributing the article to Hay, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Murray MS., WG to Robert William Hay, 2 Feb. 1816, thanks him for 'De Pradt.' Murray MS., WG to Hay, [late Mar. or early Apr. 1816], sends him 'the Abbe' (that is, the Abbé De Pradt). The article's author refers to #355, which is by Croker.

JM III's Register: attribution to Hay, but without evidence.


376 Article 11. [Shute Barrington,] The Political Life of William Wildman, Viscount Barrington, 505-13. Author: Henry Phillpotts, probably.

Running Title: Lord Barrington's Political Life. 

Notes: In attributing the article to Phillpotts, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article is much in the style of #190, which is by Phillpotts. It is marked by variety in sentence openings, balanced clauses, judicious use of short and long sentences, and inventive use of colons and semi-colons. Viscount Barrington (1717-1793), M.P. for Berwick-upon-Tweed and Plymouth, was Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1761 and Secretary at War, 1765 - 1778.

JM III's Register: attribution to Phillpotts, but without evidence. 


377 Article 12. Report from the Select Committee on the Earl of Elgin's Sculptured Marbles, &c.; Lettre du Chev. Antonio Canova, et Deux Mémoires lus a l'Institut Royal de France, sur les Ouvrages de Sculpture dans la Collection de Milord Comte d'Elgin, par le Chev. E. Q. Visconti; Haydon, The Judgment of Connoisseurs upon the Works of Art compared with that of professional Men, in reference more particularly to the Elgin Marbles; Memorandum on the present State of the Negociation respecting the Purchase of the Elgin Marbles; Stuart, The Fourth Volume of the Antiquities of Athens, measured and delineated, 513-47. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Lord Elgin's Collection of Sculptured Marbles.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 140; Jennings I 84; and Brightfield 454. Shine says to see also QR CCX 753-54. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. 

[Bookseller's note, slightly modified, with quotation from DNB: 'The removal of the marbles from the Parthenon, which was not part of the Earl's original plan (he was in Greece to record them and make casts) began in the summer of 1801 out of fear for the marauding Turks, with the permission of the local authorities. Getting them back to England did not occur without difficulty (a shipwreck and an expensive recovery of some of the marbles by divers were just part of the problem) and the task was not completed until 1812 when the last 80 cases arrived in London. "No inconsiderable outcry was raised against his conduct in connection with his removal of the antiquities. The propriety of his official actions was called into question; he was accused of vandalism, of rapacity, and dishonesty. Elgin accordingly thought it advisable to throw open his collections to public view, and arranged them in his own house in Park Lane. After some preliminary negotiations, a select committee of the House of Commons was appointed in 1816 to inquire into the desirability of acquiring the Elgin collection for the nation. The committee recommended its purchase for the sum of 35,000 pounds, and in July 1816 an act was passed giving effect to their proposal" (DNB). The Report to Parliament is a detailed account of the entire affair, with testimony by William Hamilton, John Flaxman, Richard Payne Knight, and Richard Westmacott, among others.']

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #732, Oct. 1815, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM II's marked QR: 'Croker'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.

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