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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 17 , NUMBER 33 (April 1817)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 8 Sept. 1817 [Courier advertisement, 8 Sept. 1817]

  • Notation on copy owned by Ann Cleaver, an original subscriber: 'Received Sep 8th 1817.' [Present writer's collection]

  • The following statement appears on the back of the original wrapper of  Number 32: 'No. XXXIII / WILL BE PUBLISHED IN / JUNE.' [Present writer's collection]

  • This Number sold about 8500 on the first day [Harewood MS., WG to George Canning, 17 Sept. 1817]

  • This Number sold about 12,000 altogether [Barrow, Autobiography, 506]

  • An acerbic editor's note on page 286, appended to #430, states that a 'second' edition of Lady Morgan's France, recently published, is merely a reprint of the first edition

  • Both Murray and Gifford were ill just as this Number was going to press [Duke MS., Henry Hallam to JM, 7 Sept. 1817]

  • #424, on the East India Company, was originally announced in the Courier to appear in Number 31

  • Duke MS., Henry Hallam to JM, 7 Sept. 1817, speaks of the next QR. In a subsequent sentence says, 'I have met with much civility, & tolerable punctuality at the printer's. But a little falling off in the regularity of the press would throw us out [off?] for the next paper, & I hope you will occasionally keep a look out after him [them?].' It is not clear if the reference is to QR articles but it is more likely to Hallam's Middle Ages (1818)

  • Murray MS., WG to Robert William Hay, 1 Sept. 1817, refers to Hay's 'interesting article.' His last known contribution is #397, published Nov. 1816

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 7

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 4

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


420 Article 1. Burney, A Chronological History of the Voyages and Discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean; illustrated with Charts and Plates; Martin, An Account of the Natives of the Tonga Islands, in the South Pacific Ocean, with an original Grammar and Vocabulary of their language; Transactions of the Missionary Society, 1-39. Author:  Robert Southey.

Running Title: Accounts of the Tonga Islands.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites JM III's Register; Cottle 242-43; and Southey 577. Shine says to see also Warter III 61-62 and Southey 350. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article appears in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles. The article's author refers to #97, which is also by Southey.

[Bookseller's note, modified: Mariner was a young British sailor on the Port au Prince that sailed in 1805, a whaler that spent much of her time attacking Spanish shipping. In the spring of 1806 she captured two ships, the brig Santa Isidora and the corvette Santa Maria. The Port au Prince visited Hawaii in late 1806, and then sailed with a number of Hawaiian crew. At Tonga the crew mutinied; most of the crew were massacred by the natives, but Mariner, who had come under the protection of the king lived there as his adopted son for four years. Mariner's story was cited by Byron as one of the two sources for his poem 'The Island, or Christian and his Comrades,' a romantic narrative of the Bounty mutiny. Mariner's work is one of the earliest accounts of indigenous medical practices in the Pacific. John Martin, Mariner's ghost-writer, was a physician and meteorologist of some note. Hill, p. 192.]

JM III's Register: attribution to Southey, but without evidence. 


421 Article 2. Dugald Stewart, Dissertation prefixed to the Supplemental Volumes of the Encyclopœdia Britannica, exhibiting a General View of the Progress of Metaphysical, Moral and Political Philosophy in Europe, from the Revival of Letters, 39-72. Author:  William Rowe Lyall, probably.

Running Title: Stewart's Dissertation.

Notes: In attributing the article to Lyall, Shine cites JM III's Register and its additional note. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The evidence in Shine is not in itself sufficient for a definite identification. However, the attribution is buttressed by internal evidence. There are a number of passages in this article that resemble passages in #322, which is by Lyall. There is possibly a reference on p.39 to #322. See also p.53n: 'We are glad to be able to defend our opinions concerning the inferior merits of Bacon's philosophical works.' On that point cf. pg. 307 of #322. Note the author's use of italics and repeated use of the phrases 'we shall not,' 'we have not,' 'we do not,' 'we would not,' 'having thus,' characteristic of Lyall's writing. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #774, Sept. 1816, by James Mackintosh.

JM III's Register: attribution to Lyall, and note: 'on the authority of his nephew Canon Pearson.'


422 Article 3. Raffles, History of Java, 72-96. Author: John Barrow, probably.

Running Title: Raffles's History of Java.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article's author refers to #178, a review by Barrow that is on the same topic as #422. The reviewer quotes with approval a passage from #422. The article's author also refers to #353, which is by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. Note emphasis on China and on races, typical of Barrow. The article ends with: 'We must now take leave of . . . .' a phrase typically used by Barrow (cf. #416). 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #869, Mar. 1819, by John Crawfurd.

A Note to this article appears on pages 287-89; it is mostly a quotation from a newspaper account of the massacre of the Javanese by the Dutch in late 1816.


423 Article 4. Edgeworth, Comic Dramas, in Three Acts, 96-107. Author:  Charles Robert Maturin.

Running Title: Edgeworth's Comic Dramas.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following evidence demonstrates Maturin's authorship and is published here for the first time. NLS MS. 2224 (f.79) Charles Robert Maturin to Walter Scott, 31 Nov. [1815?], thanks him for advice and says he is most anxious to write for QR. Murray MS., Maturin to JM, 27 Sept. 1817, thanks Murray for advice concerning his style for future articles, speaks of having 'panegyrized her ^Miss E. highly but justly' and that he hopes in the future to be paid more. Murray MS., Maturin to JM, 3 Oct. 1817, speaks of his article on Edgeworth's novels in preparation. Note the promise on p.107 of #423 of a return to the subject. Murray MS., Maturin to JM, 28 Jan. 1818: 'Having heard nothing of the critique on Miss E, I'll send it to the British Review.'

Claimed by Croker in three of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. Note, however, that in these lists Croker mistakenly claims #42 (on Edgeworth's Tales). Apparently Croker misremembered his having written all of the reviews of Edgeworth in the QR. Also, while the review appears on two of Croker's comprehensive lists, it does not appear on a third list that is demonstrably later and more complete.


424 Article 5. Malthus, Statements respecting the East India College, with an Appeal to Facts, in refutation of the Charges lately brought against it in the Court of Proprietors; Minute of the Marquis of Wellesley, relative to the College of Fort William, dated the 18th August, 1800 (Asiatic Register, 1800), 107-54. Author: Robert William Hay, possibly.

Running Title: East India College.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Harewood MS., WG to George Canning, 27 July 1817, says that if Canning intends to contribute to this Number, he should submit his article soon. The writing, however, does not resemble Canning's. Murray MS., WG to Robert William Hay, 1 Sept. 1817, refers to Hay's 'interesting article.' His last known contribution is #397, published Nov. 1816. The fairly frequent use of dashes and parentheses and italics is characteristic of Hay's writing. The topic and the quality of the writing, the introduction of classical allusions and quotations, and the grand peroration suggest Robert Grant. Malthus's work cited in the article's head note was published by John Murray.

The East India College was the subject of an article in ER, #786, Dec. 1816, by Andrew Rutherford.


425 Article 6. Hazlitt, The Round Table, a Collection of Essays on Literature, Men and Manners, 154-59. Author: John Taylor Coleridge, possibly.

Running Title: Hazlitt's Round Table.

Notes: In querying its attribution to James Russell, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles II 44; Graham 41; Graham in SP XXII 506; and Clark 213. Shine says to 'See, however, Entry 487'  where Russell is asserted to be a misreading for Barrett (Eton Stannard Barrett). In suggesting William Gifford as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Hazlitt, 295-401; Smiles I 263, 263n; and Robinson I, 210. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: None of these sources supply evidence to prove their assertion or assumption that Gifford wrote the article. ] 

The following hints are published here for the first time. No definitive evidence has been found to demonstrate the article's authorship. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'J. T. Coleridge' on 14 July 1817 and returned 21 Aug. 1817. The topic, tone, and length suggest WG. 

JM III's Register: [in pencil] '? A Mr Russell in memoir' [i.e., in Smiles]. 


426 Article 7. Travels in Various Countries of Europe, Asia and Africa, by Edward Daniel Clarke, LL.D. Part the Second—Greece, Egypt and the Holy Land. Sections Second and Third. To which is added a Supplement, respecting the Author's Journey from Constantinople to Vienna, containing his Account of the Gold Mines of Transylvania and Hungary. Vol. III. pp. 866. Vol. IV. pp. 769, 160-217. Author:  Reginald Heber.

Running Title: Clarke's Travels—Vols. III. and IV.

Notes: In querying its attribution to Robert Southey, Shine cites only the Gentleman's Magazine XXI 140, which lacks authority. 

The following evidence in favour of Heber's authorship is published here for the first time. The article is not in Southey's definitive holograph MS. list of his QR articles. Murray MS., Reginald Heber to JM, 2 July 1816, says he will review Clarke's last two volumes. Murray MS., Heber to JM, 14 Aug. 1816, says he has not yet received the Clarke volumes. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: Clarke's Travels Vol. III was sent to 'Rev. R. Heber' on 19 Sept. 1816 and returned 29 July 1817; vols. IV and V were sent to 'Rev. R. Heber' on 9 June 1817. Murray MS., Cash Day Book 1817-1819, p. 36, dated 10 June 1817, 'Carriage of Parcel to Rev. R. Heber'. Volume I of Clarke's travels was reviewed at #110 by George Ellis, Volume II at #242, by Reginald Heber.


427 Article 8. [Croly,] Paris in 1815. A Poem, 218-29. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Paris in 1815. A Poem.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 454. Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS. WG to JM [erroneous notation on outside: 1819-20]: 'I have been obliged to alter the conclusion of Paris ... but it was a repetition....' Iowa MS. JM to John Wilson Croker, n.d.: 'Crawley wrote to me to thank me for the Number of the Review—adding that the article on Paris was uncommonly flattering.' 

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. The poem's author is George Croly (1780-1860, DNB), a frequent contributor to Blackwood's Magazine.

 JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, citing unspecified letters. 


428 Article 9. Péron, Voyage de Découvertes aux Terres Australes, exécuté sur les Corvettes Le Géographe, Le Naturaliste, et la Goëlette Le Casuarina, pendant les Années 1800-1804. Tome Second, 229-48. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Péron—Voyage de Découvertes. Tome II.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and Gentleman's Magazine (Feb. 1844), 140; (March 1844), 246.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article's author refers to #104, a review of the first volume of this work, which is also by Barrow and is a continuation of its arguments, especially its promotion of Captain Flinders. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. An appendix to this article appears on pp.287-89.

[Bookseller's note, modified (justifying a sale price of over $27,000 US): 'The rare and important official account of the Baudin voyage to Australia and the Pacific, sent out by the French government in 1800 with orders to complete the cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Péron sailed as naturalist on the expedition and Freycinet as cartographer. It was a celebrated voyage, which brought back to France the most important collection of natural history specimens in the history of the French Museum, as well as a wealth of geographical and other information. Flinders completed his survey of the Australian coast before Baudin, but Flinders's imprisonment by the French in Mauritius for seven years resulted in the French exploration account being published first. Consequently, the Baudin-Freycinet narrative includes the first complete and fully detailed map of the Australian continent. The Atlas Historique contains a series of wonderful coloured plates, some of the most beautiful early views of Australia and fine natural history images. Ferguson, 449; Hill, pp. 229-230; Wantrup, 78a & 79a.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


429 Article 10. Sheil, The Tragic Drama.—The Apostate; a Tragedy, in Five Acts, 248-60. Author: Charles Robert Maturin, with William Gifford.

Running Title: The Tragic Drama.—The Apostate.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Maturin and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register; Graham 41; Clark 179; and the DNB on Maturin. Shine says to see also Smiles I 293; Grierson XII 361-62; and Scott-Maturin 82. Shine quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM [1817]: 'I enclose the Apostate for Rowarth [the printer]. A more potato-headed arrangement I never saw—or rather derangement. I have endeavoured to bring some order out of the chaos .... I have reduced its bulk from 19 to about 14 pages.' Notation at top of letter: 'Maturin's Review of Shiell's Apostate.' Iowa MS., JM to John Wilson Croker, n.d.: 'The Article on the Apostate is by Maturin.'  

The following evidence is published here for the first time. NLS MS. 866 (ff. 145-46), JM to Walter Scott, 27 May 1817, says that Maturin is writing for the QR; he (Murray) doubts that Maturin will succeed, and says that 'Sheils play [sic] is really very wonderful in performance ....' Murray MS., Charles Maturin to JM, 3 Oct. 1817, asks for the return of his manuscript of the article on Sheil. John Murray published the volume under review.

JM III's Register: attribution to Maturin and with the following note: 'from a letter of his dated Oct 3 1817'


430 Article 11. France, 260-86. Author: John Wilson Croker and William Gifford, with John Hookham Frere.

Running Title: France, by Lady Morgan.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Croker and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register and, for Croker alone, Gentleman's Magazine XXI 140; Jennings I 98; Brightfield 332n, 333, 454; and Pfeiffer in PQ XI 105, 412. Shine says to see also Smiles II 65; Warter III 78, 78-79; and Fitzpatrick 189-90, 198. Shine also quotes from a number of letters, including the following: Murray MS., J[ohn]. H[ookham]. Frere to JM, [n.d.]: 'I wish very much to have Ly Morgan—I have done I think a sheet ... just in the proper way .... a rodomantade of humorous nonsense ... the most laughable nonsense that I ever did.' Pencil notation on letter: 'Q R 33 Art 11.' Murray MS., WG to JM [1816]: 'Frere is excellent—his letter shall be taken care of.' Iowa MS., WG to JM, postmarked Aug 16, 1817: 'There are good hopes of the next No. [of the QR] but I am anxious to get out of this, & therefore would have you quicken Mr Frere, now that he has mentioned his purpose. Do you think that it will be advisable to delay publication beyond the 1st of September? The paper truly will be highly desirable. Try to ascertain this before you leave town. Represent to him, the necessity of losing no time.' Murray MS., WG to JM [erroneous notation on outside: '1819-20.' Allusion to article on Paris (see Entry 427) establishes 1817]: 'The Art [on Lady Morgan] seems ... formal & somewhat tending toward a pleading ... it is shrewd & convincing, &, I think, powerful .... Pray let Mr Smith copy out for me from the preface that part in which she notices advice to her in our former No. I think more may be made of it.' Iowa MS., JM to Croker, n.d.: The Marchioness of Abercorn called to express her gratification at seeing Lady Morgan so justly exposed in the Review. Many others are doing the same,—a few of them thinking it too violent, but none thinking it unjust. Shine also cites Jennings I 102 that quotes Croker to Robert Peel, 26 Nov. 1817: 'I wrote the main part ... but ... was called away to Ireland when it was in the press; and I am sorry to say that some blunders crept in accidentally, and one or two were premeditatedly added....' Shine also cites Clark 196-99 who thinks it does not resemble Croker's work and suggests Gifford. Shine also cites Pfeiffer in PQ XI 101, 412, that quotes WG to JM, 1817: 'I am not surprised at what C says of Lady Morgan.... The criticism, however, must be softened ....' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. John Hookham Frere evidently read and commented on a draft of the article and asked that its criticisms be toned down. Iowa MS. (f.94), WG to JM [16 Aug. 1817]: 'I am not surprised at what Mr. F[rere]. says of Lady Morgan, and shall be glad to receive his remarks. The book, however, is so diabolical ... that it merits a more than common degree of reprobation. The woman is dangerous. She is labouring to acquire notoriety; she is a professed writer for the public; & her impudent & persevering puffs cannot, I suspect, be met by gentle means. She is evidently capable, & desirous of doing mischief. It is necessary to put an extinguisher on her popularity with the ignorant & young & innocent. The criticism, however, must be softened[,] yet I can excuse our friend C. & even approve his indignation.' Iowa MS. (f.142), WG to JM, n.d., has been reading the first volume of Lady Morgan, finds it far worse than he had suspected, thinks that Croker has missed an important point. 'It is a counterpart of Hobhouse whom she evidently had in view—pray send a line to Ryde before you set out, & beg  Mr C. to think of this, & draw C. to this comparison. A few lines will do it.' Claimed by Croker in four of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. The article's author refers to #412 (specific reference on p. 261n), which is also by Croker. Proofs of part of the article and part of the manuscript in Croker's hand are preserved in the Murray archives. An acerbic editor's note on page 286, appended to #430, states that a 'second' edition of Lady Morgan's France, recently published, is merely a reprint of the first edition.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker citing unspecified letters, and note: [in pencil] '? Frere. See his letter here enclosed'.

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