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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 22 , NUMBER 44 (January 1820)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 17 Mar. 1820 [Courier advertisement, 16 Mar. 1820; Murray MS., WG to Robert W. Hay, 18 Mar. 1820] Anne Cleaver, an original subscriber, appears to have received her copy of Number 44 on the 20th of Mar. 1820 [Collection of the present writer]. Thomas Mitchell received his copy on the 29th [Murray MS., Mitchell to JM, 29 May 1820] Date on original wrappers: 'March 1820' [Bookseller's online booklist: David Eves, Toronto, Nov. 2003]

  • The following announcement appeared on the back wrapper of Number 43: 'No. XLIV. WILL BE PUBLISHED IN JANUARY.' The title page for Volume 22 indicates the publication dates for Numbers 43 and 44 as 'NOVEMBER & MARCH'. [Anne Cleaver's copy]

  • This Number sold 12,071 [Murray MS., WG to Robert W. Hay, 18 Mar. 1820]

  • Number 44 was the first QR to appear after the death of George III (he died 29 Jan. 1820)

  • Gifford was annoyed at the lack of Government support for the QR: 'I have no patience with these Cabinet people. When it is too late they rub their eyes and begin to see that the Review might be of the "utmost importance" to them, but they never condescend to write a thought on it when there is both time and an earnest will to serve them (i.e. the country), and nothing wanting but the means which they are called upon to supply. How often has this been urged! Yet who of them procures us a single line? / They are often happy to leave all to chance, and have neither the courage nor—but I am tired of this. Mr. Croker is the only link that unites us at all with the Ministers, and the service he has done them by his various papers is incalculable; but he cannot do everything, and it is certain that, to meet the present state of the country, an elaborate article is requisite.' [quoted in Smiles, II 52-53]

  • Murray MS., WG to John Taylor Coleridge, 12 Mar. 1819: 'Mr Parry has rather gone out of his way to attack us in his letter to Brougham.' Francis Charles Parry, Objections to Mr. Brougham's Bill, for inquiring into Abuses in Charitable Donations, with a proposal for introducing a system into the management of those funds that shall prevent or detect future abuses, etc.  (1819)

  • Parliament had been in session from 4 Aug. 1818. It  was prorogued 29 Feb. 1820 and summoned again 21 Apr. 1820

  • The Cato Street conspirators (who aimed to assassinate the Cabinet) were arrested in Feb. 1820

  • Items for 1820 from Jack Lynch's literary resources page, slightly modified:

    • January: George III dies and is succeeded by George IV. The new King begins divorce proceedings against Queen Caroline.
    • Revolution in Spain: military and popular revolts force King Ferdinand to swear allegiance to the Constitution of 1812.
    • In Naples, Italy, soldiers and citizens revolt in favor of a constitutional monarchy.
    • Revolution in Portugal: the Regency is deposed and a Junta is established in order to frame a constitutional monarchy. English officers are dismissed from Portugal's armed forces.
    • Antarctica discovered.
    • Walter Scott is knighted by George IV.
    • Slave registration effected in the sugar colonies; foreign slave trade abolished May 1820 in treaty with Spain following the signing of a treaty with France signed in 1819
    • Phenomenal growth of evangelicalism in Scotland; new generation of English evangelicals emerging, less politically liberal than their forebears; Aug. 1820 Mant's charge to the Irish clergy of Killalve initiates anti-Catholic crusade; Bishop Marsh of Peterborough poses 87 questions to weed out Calvinist candidates for benefices; Robert Southey publishes The Life of Wesley (see QR #558)
    • Hyper-Tory 'John Bull' newspaper founded by Theodore Hook.
    • Thomas Malthus publishes Principles of Political Economy (see QR #606)
    • Charles Robert Maturin publishes Melmoth the Wanderer (see QR #567); Scott publishes The Abbott, Ivanhoe and The Monastery (see QR #605); Shelley publishes Prometheus Unbound (see QR #607);

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #526, #529, #533

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 9

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


524 Article 1. Bowdich, Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee, with a Statistical Account of that Kingdom, and Geographical Notices of other Parts of the Interior of Africa; Bowdich, The African Committee, 272-302. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Bowdich's Mission to Ashantee.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Gentleman's Magazine (Mar. 1844), 246-47. The article is referred to in #657, which is by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. The discussion of the river Niger's possible connection with the Nile (pp.291-93) is a favourite topic of Barrow's (see #544). John Murray published Mission from Cape Coast Castle.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


525 Article 2. Stephens, Thesaurus Grœcœ Linguœ ab H. Stephano constructus. Editio nova, auctior et emedatior. Vol I. Partes I-IV. Londini, in ædibus Valpianis, 302-48. Author: Charles James Blomfield.

Running Title: Stephens's Thesaurus.

Notes: In attributing the article to Blomfield, Shine cites JM III's Register; Blomfield I 27; and CHEL XII 526. Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, n.d.: refers to an article on Bowdich (#524) and says 'I have nothing from Blomfield this morning—this is trifling with us.' Murray MS., WG to JM, n.d.: 'Mr Blomfield has sent three or four pages more ....' .

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Robert Walpole to JM, 29 May 1820, says that the article on Valpy in the last QR was by a friend of his. (Article #525 is a review of Valpy's edition of Stephens's thesaurus.) 

JM III's Register: attribution to Blomfield, but without evidence. 


526 Article 3. Plancy, Dictionnaire Infernal; ou Recherches et Anecdotes sur les Démons, les Esprits, les Fantömes, les Spectres, les Revenans, les Loup-garoux, les Possédés, les Sorciers, les Sabbats, les Magiciens, les Salamandres, les Sylphes, les Gnomes, les Visions, les Songes, les Prodiges, les Charmes, les Maléfices, les Secrets merveilleux, les Talismans, &c. &c. &c.; Garinet, Histoire de la Magie en France depuis le commencement de la Monarchie, jusqu' à nos Jours; Danske Folkesagn, samlede af J. M. Thiele; Deutsche Sagen, herausgegeben von den Brüdern Grimm; Dobeneck, Des Deutschen Mittelalters, Volksglauben und Heroensagen; Tales of the Dead, principally Translated from the French, 348-80. Author: Francis Cohen.

Running Title: Popular Mythology of the Middle Ages.

Notes: In attributing the article to Cohen (Palgrave), Shine cites JM III's Register; Palgrave [reprinted in Palgrave's Collected Historical Works]; and says to see also Smiles II 15.

The following information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Robert Southey to JM, 5 Apr. 1820, asks if the Norse article was written by William Herbert. He would like to know the person capable of finding water with a hazel twig. Murray MS., Thomas Mitchell to JM, n.d., wonders who wrote the article on the mythology of the Middle Ages; thinks it might be the author of Ivanhoe.

JM III's Register: attribution to Cohen (Palgrave), but without evidence. 


527 Article 4. Grundsätze der Strategie erläutert durch die Darstellung des Feldzugs von 1796 in Deutschland; Principes de la Stratégie développés par la Relation de la Campagne de 1796, en Allemagne; ouvrage traduit de l'Allemand, et attribué à S. A. I. l' Archiduc Charles; Geschichte des Feldzuges von 1799 in Deutschland und in der Schweitz, 380-401. Author: Robert William Hay.

Running Title: Strategics—The Archduke Charles.

Notes: In attributing the article to Hay, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS. WG to Robert William Hay, 28 Dec. 1819, says he has sent his manuscript to the printer. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Hay, but without evidence.


528 Article 5. Payne, Brutus, or the Fall of Tarquin, an Historical Tragedy; Shiel, Evadne, or the Statue. A Tragedy, in Five Acts, 402-15. Author: John Taylor Coleridge.

Running Title: Brutus and Evadne.

Notes: In attributing the article to Coleridge, Shine cites JM III's Register and Graham 41. Neither source supplies evidence.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., John Taylor Coleridge to WG, 22 Jan. 1819, asks if 'Brutus Tarquin' is engaged. Murray MS., WG to Coleridge, 12 Mar. 1819, accepts Coleridge's proposal to review these works.

JM III's Register: attribution to Coleridge, but without evidence.


529 Article 6. Humboldt, Sur l' Elévation des Montagnes de l' Inde, 415-30. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Passage of the Himalaya Mountains.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and Smiles II 52; neither source supplies evidence. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Gentleman's Magazine (Mar. 1844), 246-47. The Himalayas was Barrow's preserve in the QR and he wrote about it in Encyclopœdia Britannica. The article's author refers to #435 (three times), which is by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. A lengthy note appears on pages 279-80 of Number 45 that clarifies an anecdote in article #529.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


530 Article 7. Lysias, A Letter respectfully addressed to His Royal Highness the Prince Regent on occasion of the Death of her late lamented Majesty, 430-36. Author: Robert Grant, probably.

Running Title: Lysias—Letter to the Prince Regent.

Notes: In attributing the article to Grant, Shine cites JM III's Register and Smiles II 52 [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: neither of these sources supplies evidence. Smiles asserts that the article was by Grant, but Smiles probably relies upon JM III's Register. Note the defence of Christianity in the article; Grant was an Evangelical Christian.]

JM III's Register: attribution to Grant, but without evidence. 


531 Article 8. Travels in Nubia, by the Late John Lewis Burckhardt, 437-81. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Burckhardt's Travels in Nubia.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, n.d.: 'Mr Barrow says he is hard at work on Burckhardt's Travels.'

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Book Loans Register: the book reviewed was sent to 'John Barrow' on 28 Jan. 1818. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 1 July 1820, speaks of his article on Burckhardt and mentions 'Mangles' (see pp.454, 478). The article's author refers to #337 (specific reference) and #457 three times (including a specific reference), both of which are by Barrow. The article is referred to in #544 and #651, both of which are also by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. The publisher of the volume under review is the Association for promoting the Discovery of the interior Parts of Africa. The Association was a forerunner of the Royal Geographical Society, whose primary founder was John Barrow. (Royal Geographical Society holds the Association's papers, 1788-1831, reference code: GB 0402 AAS.) A primary purpose of the Association (founded in 1788 and headed by Barrow's geographical mentor, Sir Joseph Banks) was to encourage the effort to discover the source of the Niger, a major preoccupation of Barrow's. Burckhardt's volume was published by John Murray. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #924, Aug. 1820, by Sydney Smith.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


532 Article 9. Le Royaume de Westphalie—Jérome Buonaparte—sa Cour—ses Favoris—et ses Ministres. Par un Témoin oculaire, 481-92. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Jerome Buonaparte—Court of Westphalia,

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 455. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [16 Feb. 1820]:  'What is become of Mr Croker's Art? It has not been sent to me, & I rather think we shall want it ....'. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in five of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.

Sample: 'The shortest lived of kingdoms was the kingdom of Westphalia, and yet it lived longer than it deserved. It was created in the wantonness of Buonaparte's audacity, and it was swept away in the whirlwind of European vengeance.' (p.481) 'The breaking up of the ten years frost in which Buonaparte had bound up the limbs and faculties of Europe, carried away in its débâcle King Jerome and his court. The ill-assorted kingdom of Westphalia fell to pieces, and the liberated people returned with joy to the beneficent rule of their sovereigns of a thousand years:—while Counts Daru and Beugnot, and Simeon and Jollivet, found in France, under the wise and discriminating rule of Louis XVIII., that countenance and fortune, those honours and those offices, of which the tried friends of his martyred brother, and the devoted companions of his own adversity are deprived, with all the jealousy of a relentless and personal persecution.' (p. 492)


533 Article 10. The Substance of the Speech of the Right Hon. W. C. Plunket, in the House of Commons, on Tuesday the 23d of November, 1819; Substance of the Speech of the Right Hon. George Canning, in the House of Commons, on Wednesday, November 24th, 1819, on the Address to the Throne, upon the Opening of the Session of Parliament; Substance of the Speech of the Right Hon. Lord Grenville, in the House of Lords, November 30, 1819, on the Marquis of Lansdowne's Motion, That a Select Committee be appointed to inquire into the State of the Country, and more particularly into the Distress and Discontents prevalent in the Manufacturing Districts, and the Execution of the Laws with respect to the numerous Meetings which have taken place, 492-560. Author: Robert Grant.

Running Title: State of Public Affairs.

Notes: In attributing the article to Grant, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 52; and Clark 178 (that states WG added a selection from Canning's speech). Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [16 Feb. 1820]: 'I have nobody to send to Mr Grant—be good enough to let some careful person take the enclosed. This moment I have recd a little more m.s. & the remr is promised tomorrow. I think this Art will make a great impression. Three such magnificent Speeches have never been placed at the head of one before.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [25 Feb. 1820]: 'Just after the boy had gone, the revise reached me from [blank].'

The following information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book, 1818-20, p.208: 'Quarterly Review 44 ... 1 copy each to Ld Grenville, to Miller Esq & to Hon. C. Arbuthnot.' William Wyndham, Baron Grenville (1759-1834; DNB), Prime Minister, MP, he had been First Lord of Treasury during his own administration. Charles Arbuthnot (1767-1850; DNB), diplomat, in 1820 Tory MP and joint-secretary of Treasury. 

Francis Jeffrey wrote on the state of the country in ER #887, Oct. 1819.

JM III's Register: attribution to Grant, but without evidence.

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