Vol 27. No. 54 - Index

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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 27 , NUMBER 54 (July 1822)


NOTES

  • This Number was published on or about 23 Oct. 1822 [Courier 22 Oct. 1822; Present writer's collection: Ann Cleaver, a contemporary subscriber, noted in her copy of Number 54: 'Recd Oct. 24 1822.'; Murray MS., Cash Book, 1821-24, p.186: 'Quarterly Review No 54 12,000. / 25 Oct. 1822'] 

  • Murray printed 12,000 of this Number [see previous note]

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #639, #640 (Senior on Scott's Fortunes of Nigel), #646, #647 (Heber on Byron)

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 9

  • Number of articles for which no suggestion of authorship is made: 2

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


638 Article 1. Bankes, The Civil and Constitutional History of Rome, from its Foundation to the Age of Augustus, 273-308.  Author: William Haygarth.

Running Title: Early History of Rome.

Notes: In attributing the article to Haygarth, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Arguably, in writing this article Haygarth plagiarized an essay by Thomas Arnold in the Encyclopœdia Metropolitana. Murray MS., William Haygarth to JM, 4 Jan 1822, says he has received the proofs of his article on 'Banke's History.' Bodleian MS. d.130 (ff.62-63), Thomas Arnold to John Taylor Coleridge, 12 Dec. 1822: 'Can you tell me who wrote the Article in the last Quarterly about the Roman History? It was a curious coincidence that it should appear just at the Time with my Essay on the same Subject in the Ency. Metrop:,—and there is a marvelous Agreement in the Arguments used by us both, which made me anxious to know who it is that I so resemble.' Murray MS., WG to Coleridge, 19 Dec. 1822: 'the writer of the paper you mention, was a gentleman of the name Haygarth.' The article is referred to in #42WI, which is by Thomas Arnold. Interestingly, Gentlemen's Magazine XXXI, 579 attributes #638 to Arnold. John Murray published the volume under review.

 JM III's Register: attribution to Haygarth, citing unspecified letters and the following note: 'from a letter of W H.'s'


639 Article 2. Cottingham, Plans, Elevations, and Sections of Henry the Seventh's Chapel, 308-36. Author: Francis Cohen.

Running Title: Application and Intent of the various Styles of Architecture. [Textual note: in the body of the article Application and Intent of the various appears as the running title on left-hand pages, Styles of Architecture appears as the running title on right hand pages. The Running title on pages 309 and 336, right-hand and left-hand pages, respectively, is Application of the various Styles of Architecture.]

Notes: In attributing the article to Cohen, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked 18 July 1822: 'Cohen, too, I have read here—Before I left town he requested that the Edinburgh Advertisement might, above all, be preserved. I had not read it. He is very wrong, for the thing is heavy & dull & not a creature will wade through it. It spoils his paper & should not be preserved in it—but I will write to him. The article itself is excellent.' Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 27 July 1822: 'There is also Cohen's Art which I wish him to have as soon as possible. If we can agree about the dull long-winded advertisement, there is nothing to dispute about. He has improved it since I saw it, & the paper is, in fact, highly creditable to his powers of writing....' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. On the first page of the article the author makes a specific reference to page 116 of article #582, which is also by Cohen, and implies that the present article is a continuation. WG lost his argument about the advertisement (see the letter quoted above), for it appears in the article on page 327. Murray MS., Francis Cohen to JM, 13 Aug. 1822: 'I have just left my article at Rowarth's [Murray's printer].' Cohen later took the name Palgrave. This article is not reprinted in Palgrave's Collected Historical Works.

JM III's Register: attribution to Cohen, but without evidence. 


640 Article 3. [Scott,] The Fortunes of Nigel. By the Author of 'Waverley,' 'Kenilworth,' &c., 337-64. Author: Nassau William Senior.

Running Title: The Fortunes of Nigel.

Notes: In attributing the article to Senior, Shine cites JM III's Register; Senior 97-137; Levy 97-98; and Hillhouse 50.

For a brief overview of Scott's works and their critical reception (including mention of reviews not covered in the Wellesley Index) see Edinburgh University Library's excellent Walter Scott Digital Archive.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #995, June 1822, by Francis Jeffrey and in New Monthly Magazine #292, July 1822, by T. N. Talfourd.

JM III's Register: [in pencil] '? Nassau Senior,' but without evidence.


641  Article 4. Campbell, Travels in South Africa, undertaken at the Request of the London Missionary Society; being a Narrative of a Second Journey in the Interior of that Country, 364-77.  Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Missionary Travels in South Africa.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [19 July 1822 pd]: 'Barrow says that he has a short paper on Campbell ....' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 4 and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 13 July 1822, says he sends 'Campbell'. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow citing unspecified letters, and with the following note: 'from a letter of J B's July 13 1822.'.


642  Article 5. Bentham, The Elements of the Art of Packing Juries, as applied to Special Juries, particularly in Cases of Libel Law, 377-82. Author not identified.

Running Title: Bentham—On the Art of Packing Juries.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article.  

The following discussion is published here for the first time. A guess is William Rowe Lyall. Note use of italics. William Gifford, possibly. Cf. #455, possibly by Lyall, and #500, possibly by Gifford.


643  Article 6. Œuvres complétes de Démosthène et d'Eschine, en Grec et en François. Traduction de l'Abbé Auger, de l'Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres en Paris. Nouvelle Edition, revue et corrigée par J. Planche, Professeur de Rhétorique au Collège Royal de Bourbon. Tom. i.—iv., 382-404. Author: Thomas Mitchell.

Running Title: Panegyrical Oratory of Greece.

Notes: In attributing the article to Mitchell, Shine cites JM III's Register and says to see also the DNB article on Mitchell. Shine quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked 18 July 1822: 'I have also read Mitchell twice. He is very clever & lively entertaining, & visibly improves. Still he wants tact to govern his feelings & experience of what the world will bear .... There is a want of connection & a desultory slipping into the midst of modern times while in the height of antient discussion. The paper is far too long as is, & yet he must say a word or two on the French translation. If he has not read it, send him the Edinb Revw [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: a reference to ER #972 and #984, articles on the Greek orators, by Henry Brougham] & he may make up something from the extracts which are all that I know of the work. He has not, I suppose, put the last hand to it. When he has done this, let me have his copy & I will go to work with it—What is cut out may be used hereafter. Upon the whole my judgment of the paper is highly favourable. ... I once thought that Mr Mitchell ... might be useful to us in light articles of two or three pages, but I am convinced now that if he is not great he is nothing.... I like his notion of taking up the Don & Friar much. The latter, I believe is little understood in this country, and therefore little praised.' Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 19 July 1822: 'Our friend Mitchell you see, has made the very discovery which my former letter pointed out. Let him by all means, do as he says. But some work must be chosen to head the art. Of the satisfaction I feel at his taking up the Don I spoke before ... let Mr Mitchell lose no time.... He has not much [more] to do.…'

JM III's Register: attribution to Mitchell, citing unspecified letters.


644 Article 7. James, An Account of the Military Occurrences of the late War between Great Britain and the United States of America, &c.; Thomson, Historical Sketches of the late War between the United States and Great Britain; blended with Anecdotes illustrative of the individual Bravery of the American Sailors, Soldiers, and Citizens; Prevost, The Letters of Veritas; containing a succinct Narrative of the Military Administration of Sir George Prevost during his Command in the Canadas; whereby it will be manifest that the Merit of preserving them from Conquest belongs not to him, 405-49. Author: George Procter.

Running Title: Campaigns in the Canadas.

Notes: In attributing the article to Procter, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 18 July 1821: 'I had a very good letter from Procter. He promises just such a thing as I wish—he knows very little of me if he supposes I want him to spare Sir G. Prevost. Had my advice been taken, the American war would have ended very differently & Barrow knows it.' Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked 27 July 1822: he is sending Procter revised.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., George Procter to JM, 20 Aug., 31 Oct, and 5 Dec. 1821, 18 Feb., 15 July and 12 Nov. 1822 refer to his article on the 'late America war' at its various stages from proposal to publication to payment. This article is referred to in #724, which is also by Procter. 

[Bookseller's note concerning Some Account of the Public Life of the Late Lieutenant-General Sir George Prevost, Bart. Particularly of His Services in the Canadas; including A Reply to the Strictures on his Military Character, contained in an article in the Quarterly Review for October, 1822. (1823) 'Prevost was personally responsible for two humiliations: the withdrawal under fire after a naval victory at Sackett's Harbour and a similar retreat at Plattsburg where the Canadian naval flotilla was defeated on 11 Sept. 1814. He was summoned to England in 1815. On arrival there he found that a naval court had condemned his conduct. He demanded a court martial but died on 5 Jan. 1816, a week before the date set for the trial. His family tried for many years to obtain a hearing, feeling sure that his memory could be vindicated, but their requests met with refusal. The authorship of this work is often attributed to E. B. Brenton, Prevost's Canadian secretary.']

Biographies of George Prevost and Edward Barbizon Brenton are available in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online on the website of the Library and Archives of Canada. The George Prevost entry comments on this Quarterly Review article and Prevost's response to it.

JM III's Register: attribution to Procter, citing unspecified letters.


645  Article 8. Mayow, Plain Preaching; or, Sermons for the Poor and for People of all Ranks; Mayow, Sermons and Miscellaneous Pieces. To which is prefixed a Memoir of his Life, 450-59. Author not identified.

Running Title: Mayow—Sermons and Miscellanies.

Notes: In the absence of guidance from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article. 

The following discussion is published here for the first time. A possibility is 'Collinson,' perhaps Septimus Collinson, a divine. A 'Collinson' certainly published in the QR in this period, but no article has been identified as from his pen. See John Wilson Croker to John Murray, Brighton, 29 March 1823 (quoted in Smiles II 57-58): ' ... remember the necessity of absolute secrecy on this point, and indeed on all others. If you were to publish such names as Cohen and Croker and Collinson and Coleridge, the magical WE would have little effect, and your Review would be absolutely despised—omne ignotum pro mirifico.' Note the frequent use of small capitals and italics, and the recommendation of Nonjurors, characteristic of William Rowe Lyall.


646 Article 9. Buckland, Account of an Assemblage of Fossil Teeth and Bones of Elephant, Rhinoceros, Hippopotamus, Bear, Tiger, and Hyaena, and Sixteen other Animals, discovered in a Cave at Kirkdale, in the year 1821: with a comparative view of Five similar Caverns in various parts of England, and others on the Continent. By the Rev. W. Buckland, F.R.S. Professor of Mineralogy and Geology in the University of Oxford, &c. Philosophical Transactions for 1822. Part I., 459-76. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Buckland—On Antediluvian Fossil Bones.

Notes: In the absence of direction from JM III's Register, Shine does not suggest an author for this article.  

The following evidence was first published in VPR 27. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 4 and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1823]: 'The Provost of Oriel has written to me this morning to say that he has an Article on Buckland [see #680], taking a philosophical view of the subject. This is just what is wanted, as our friend Barrow has already given us the technical part of it: which is but a narrow contemplation of a great question sufficiently important in many respects.' Shine quotes this letter at #680, but misses its use as evidence in establishing the author of #646.

'Fossile fishes' are the subject of a review in ER, #989, June 1822, possibly by J. R. McCulloch.


647 Article 10. 1. Marino Faliero, Doge of Venice, an Historical Tragedy—.2. Sardanapaulus, a Tragedy.—3. The Two Foscari, a Tragedy.—4. Cain, a Mystery, 476-524. Author: Reginald Heber.

Running Title: Lord Byron's Dramas.

Notes: In attributing the article to Heber, Shine cites JM III's Register; Heber 11 59, 59n; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579; Graham 41; and Clark 207, 275, 275 n.169. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #982, Feb. 1822, by Francis Jeffrey.

JM III's Register: attribution in the first instance to 'W Gifford' supported with the following note: 'authors name given in letter of Sir G. Dallas. Nov. 1822.' Attribution revised to 'W Gifford or Bb Heber' in the light of the following note: 'Bp Heber. See Byron's Life, 8vo Ed. p.570 note.' 


648 Article 11. Hancock, Researches into the Laws and Phenomena of Pestilence; including a Medical Sketch and Review of the Plague of London in 1665, and Remarks on Quarantine, &c.; Faulkner, A Treatise on the Plague, designed to prove it contagious from Facts collected during the Author's Residence in Malta when visited by that Malady in 1813; with Observations on its Prevention, Character and Treatment; Maclean, Results of an Investigation respecting epidemic and pestilential Disease; including Researches in the Levant concerning the Plague; Minutes of Evidence before the Select Committee appointed to consider the Validity of the Doctrine of Contagion in Plague; Miscellaneous Works of the late Robert Willan, M.D. &c. &c. comprising an Inquiry into the Antiquity of the Small-pox, Measles and Scarlet Fever, &c. &c. Edited by Ashby Smith, M.D., &c. &c.; Thomason, Historical Sketch of the Opinions entertained by Medical men respecting the Varieties and the Secondary Occurrence of Small-pox; with Observations on the Nature and Extent of the Security afforded by Vaccination against Attacks of that Disease, 524-53. Author: Robert Gooch.

Running Title: Contagion and Quarantine.

Notes: In attributing the article to Gooch, Shine cites Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579 and Sketches of Eminent Medical Men (n.d.) 140.

Gooch is author of an article on the same topic #69WI, Dec. 1825 (the evidence for attribution is unassailable). Oddly, Gooch is credited with the authorship of 'The Quarterly review of Dr. Macmichael on contagion' in Blackwood's Magazine #283, Feb. 1826. The latter attribution derives from a publisher's list and, given the circumstances, appears to the present writer to be suspect.

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February 2005

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