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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 29 , NUMBER 58 (July 1823)


NOTES

  • This Number was published between 30 Dec. 1823 and 27 Jan. 1824, probably on or close to the latter date [Courier advertisement 30 Dec. 1824; Murray MS., Bills: 27 Jan. 1824; the date on the QR's original front wrapper is 'December 1823'; William Gifford to George Canning, 13 Dec. 1823 (quoted in Smiles II 157): '... the 58th is now nearly finished.';  the original back wrapper of Number 57 reads, 'No. LVIII. / WILL BE PUBLISHED IN / DECEMBER']

  • At the end of this volume, on pp. 597-98, a note appears titled: 'NOTE. In Continuation of Intelligence respecting the Interior of Africa'. See QR #692.

  • Liverpool Library MS., Reginald Heber to an unidentified correspondent, 'Saturday,' [n.d. but c. 1823] requests that his correspondent loan him Dr. Cove's Ecclesiastical Revenues. 'I think it as well to add that in conversing yesterday with some literary men at the Bishop of London's.—I heard a very high Character of Mr Coleridge—after the reports wh. we heard this is very satisfactory, as, in such a quarter, a person of doubtful religious opinions wd certainly have not been so highly spoken of.' John Taylor Coleridge was at this time being considered for the editorship of the QR. See #693

  • The first Number of the Radical Westminster Review appeared in Jan. 1824 [Courier advertisement 29 Jan. 1824, 'this day']. The prospectus was published in Dec. 1823 [Monthly Literary Advertiser 10 Dec. 1823]

  • Items for 1824 from Jack Lynch's literary resources page, slightly modified:

    • Charles X of France assumes the throne after the death of Louis XVIII.
    • British colonial wars in Burma.
    • Opening of the National Gallery in London.
    • Inauguration of the London Institute.
    • John Smith, a missionary, dies whilst a prisoner in Demerara following a slave insurrection he is accused of helping to incite. His death energizes the anti-slavery movement in Britain (see QR #691).
    • £500,000 granted for church building in England.
    • Byron publishes Don Juan, XV-XVI; Carlyle translates Goethe's Wilhelm Meister; Hogg publishes Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; June: The publication of Mary Shelley's edition of Percy Shelley's Posthumous Poems is suppressed at the request of Percy Shelley's father; Scott publishes St. Ronan's Well and Redgauntlet.
    • Byron dies in Greece.
  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #684, #690, #691

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 9

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 2

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


684  Article 1. Cardinal Maury, Essai sur l'Eloquence de la Chaire. Nouvelle Edition; Edward Irving, For the Oracles of God, Four Orations; For Judgment to Come, an Argument in Nine Parts, 283-313. Author: Henry Hart Milman.

Running Title: Pulpit Eloquence.

Notes: In attributing the article to Milman, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine says to see also Blackwood's Magazine XV 83-84. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [Sept. 1823]: 'Milman's promised paper, if well written, may be serviceable—but it required considerable talent & discrimination. However, I see no reason to fear him.' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS.: The article appears in Henry Hart Milman's autograph list of his QR articles.

Edward Irving's Orations was reviewed in Westminster Review, Jan. 1824, possibly by Henry Southern.

JM III's Register: attribution to Milman, but without evidence.


685 Article 2. Œuvres complètes de Démosthène et d'Eschine, en Grec et en François. Nouvelle Editon, revue et corrigée par J. Planche, 313-83. Author: Thomas Mitchell, probably.

Running Title: Legal Oratory of Greece.

Notes: In attributing the article to Mitchell, Shine cites JM III's Register; North in Blackwood's XV, 84: 'the translator of Aristophanes'; and says to see also DNB (claims an article for Mitchell in Number 58).

The following additional evidence is published here for the first time. The article's author refers to #643 (specific reference to p.384), which is also by Mitchell and on the same subject.

JM III's Register: attribution to Mitchell, but without evidence. 


686 Article 3. Faux, Memorable Days in America, being a Journal of a Tour to the United States, principally undertaken to ascertain, by positive Evidence, the Condition and probable Prospects of British Emigrants; including Accounts of Mr. Birkbeck's Settlement in the Illinois, 338-70. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Faux—Memorable Days in America.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and sources that merely guess at the article's authorship, including Clark 184 ('It has ... many marks of the editor's work.') and Clark 187 (asserts by Barrow). Shine says to see also North in Blackwood's Magazine XV 84 and Smiles II 157. Smiles quotes from Barrow to Murray 11 Aug. 1823 and asserts that the letter alludes to a review by Barrow of Faux's Memorable Days..

The following information and evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 5, and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 12 Aug. 1823, states unequivocally that he is the author of this article. 

[Bookseller's note, silently modified: 'Important account of America by an English farmer dedicated to the Duke of Bedford and Thomas William Coke. Faux set off for America in order to determine emigration prospects in the wake of an exodus of his countrymen. His journal gives an account of his voyage from London to Boston and his visits to Charleston, Camden, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, Kentucky, Indiana and the Birkbeck settlement in Illinois. "Faux laps up stories that are unpleasant or frightening, including reports about bilious fever, ague, jaundice, and other diseases which might discourage emigration. Yet Memorable Days in America is not a one-sided account. It makes light of things British as well as American. On the whole it is as complimentary as it is critical. American dislike of the book was probably partly due to sensitiveness about any British criticism of American institutions in those postwar years." (Clark pp. 239-240)']

The article elicited a response by Thomas Law in A Reply to Certain Insinuations, Published as an Article, in the Sixty-Eighth Number of The Quarterly Review. (Washington: 1824). The subject of this article was reviewed in Westminster Review #6, Jan. 1824, by Peregrine Bingham. This article was the subject of a rejoinder in Westminster Review #12, Jan. 1824, also by Peregrine Bingham.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


687  Article 4. Lord John Russell, Don Carlos, or Persecution; a Tragedy, in Five Acts, 370-82. Author: Henry Taylor, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Lord John Russell—Don Carlos, a Tragedy.

Notes: In attributing the article to Taylor and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register; Taylor I 51, 51n: Taylor only; and DNB: Taylor. In suggesting John Wilson Croker as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579.

The following discussion is published here for the first time. The secondary sources Shine cites are sufficient for a definite attribution to Henry Taylor. The article does not appear in any of Croker's lists of his articles preserved in the Clements Library, nor is it included in the bound volumes of Croker's articles preserved at the Cambridge University Library.

JM III's Register: attribution to Taylor and Gifford citing unspecified letters. 


688 Article 5. Malcolm, A Memoir of Central India, including Malwa and adjoining Provinces; with the History, and copious Illustrations, of the Past and Present Condition of that Country, 382-414. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Malcolm—Memoir of Central India.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and North in Blackwood's XV 84: 'every way worthy of Mr Barrow.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 5, and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 18 Aug. 1823, states unequivocally that he is the author of this article. Barrow refers to an earlier article of his, #442. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1066, July 1824, by Francis Jeffrey, and in Eclectic Review #76, Aug. 1824, probably by John Ryley.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


689  Article 6. [M.J.S.] Orgueil et Vanité, Comédie en 5 actes, et en prose; Duval, La Fille d'Honneur, Comédie en 5 actes, en vers; Mirmont, Le Folliculaire, Comédie en 5 actes, et en vers; Etienne, Les Plaideurs sans Procès, Comédie en trois actes; Ribouté L'Amour et l'Ambition, Comédie en cinq actes; Scribe, Valérie, Comédie en cinq actes; Scribe, Le Secrétaire et le Cuisinier, Comédie, 414-40. Author: Richard Chenevix.

Running Title: French Comedy.

Notes: In attributing the article to Chenevix, Shine cites JM III's Register and North in Blackwood's XV 84. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [Sept. 1823]: 'Chenevix I thought of putting into one Art. but the first part, at all events, may be set up.' 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. On the opening page of the article, the author refers to #676, on French tragedy, which is by Chenevix. The subject of #689 was promised in #676. Note Chenevix's spelling of Lewis XIV, a form he adopts in other QR articles. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Chenevix, but without evidence. 


690  Article 7. A Collection of rare and curious Tracts on Witchcraft, and the Second Sight, or an original Essay on Witchcraft; The famous History of Friar Bacon, containing the wonderful Things that he did in his Life, also the Manner of his Death; with the Lives and Deaths of the two Conjurors, Bungay and Vandermast (Reprint), 440-75. Author: Francis Cohen, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Superstition and Knowledge.

Notes: In attributing the article to Cohen (Francis Palgrave), Shine cites JM III's Register and Palgrave. Shine quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1823]: 'Cohen must have mistaken me or I him ... I never thought of opening with his Art. nor is it proper for it. I have read it this evening, & have many doubts about its tendency:—it must, at all events, be carefully pruned. It is clever but rash. ... Cohen wishes to have back his paper; I have therefore put it up for him, I must beg you to give it to him.' In suggesting Robert Southey as an alternative attribution, Shine cites North in Blackwood's XV 84: 'probably Southey's.' Shine says to 'See, however, Warter III 427: nothing by Southey in this number of QR.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Francis Cohen to JM, [Sept. 1822]: 'I send my article on superstitions .... My hero is Roger Bacon ....' Murray MS., Francis Cohen to JM, 31 Aug. 1823 [1 Sept. 1823 postmark]: 'I rather expected that either you or Mr. Gifford would have acknowledged rect. of the slips—How doth the revise proceed?' 

JM III's Register: attribution to Palgrave, but without evidence. 


691  Article 8. Substance of the Debate in the House of Commons on 15th May, 1823, on a Motion for the 'Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery throughout the British Dominions'; with a Preface and Appendixes containing Facts and Reasonings illustrative of Colonial Bondage; Wilberforce, An Appeal to the Religion, Justice, and Humanity of the Inhabitants of the British Empire in behalf of the Negro Slaves in the West Indies; Negro Slavery; or a View of some of the more prominent Features of that State of Society as it exists in the United States of America and in the Colonies of the West Indies, especially in Jamaica; Declaration of the Objects of the Liverpool Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery; A Review of some of the Arguments which are commonly advanced against Parliamentary Interference in behalf of the Negro Slaves; with a Statement of Opinions which have been expressed on that Subject by many of our most distinguished Statesmen; Clarkson, Thoughts on the Necessity of improving the Condition of the Slaves in the British Colonies, with a View to their ultimate Emancipation; and on the Practicability, the Safety, and the Advantages of the latter Measure. Second Edition, corrected, 475-508. Author: Joseph Lowe, probably, and possibly with John Barrow.

Running Title: Condition of the Negroes in our Colonies.

Notes: In attributing the article to David Low, Shine cites only JM III's Register. [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: Shine, almost certainly incorrectly, conjectures that the 'Low' referred to in JM III's Register is David Low. In the Index of Contributors section, Shine speculates that this could be either David Low (1768-1855), the Bishop of Ross or David Low (1768-1859), a professor of agriculture at Edinburgh. But Shine appears to have been misled by JM III's spelling 'Low' as neither of the men Shine mentions is recorded as having taken any public interest in slavery or West Indian affairs; Joseph Lowe, on the other hand, in 1807 published an Inquiry into the State of the British West Indies.]

The following information and evidence is published here for the first time. The opening paragraph of the article, which constitutes a prefix and may be an editorial addition, contains a reference to #602, which is by Barrow. It was Barrow's signature practice in his QR articles to refer to his own works. Murray MS., Robert John Wilmot Horton to WG, 20 Oct. 1824: says that he hears 'a good deal of interest among those persons who are connected with Abolition & West India affairs' and that in the New Times a series of articles has been published attacking it under the signature 'Anglus'. Horton states that in the Star 'Vindex' has defended the article. Horton proposes bringing Vindex together in a pamphlet that could then be the subject of an article in the QR. There is a reference to article #691 on page 165 of #701, which is by William Jacob.

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1086, Oct. 1824, by Henry Brougham, in New Monthly Magazine #571, Mar. 1824, by Cyrus Redding, in Westminster Review #15, Apr. 1824, by William Ellis, and in Eclectic Review #13, Feb. 1824, probably by Josiah Conder, and #33, Mar. 1824, also probably by Josiah Conder.

JM III's Register: attribution to '—Low,' but without evidence.


692 Article 9. Adams, Sketches taken during Ten Voyages to Africa between the Years 1786 and 1800; including Observations on the Country between Cape Palmas and the River Congo, &c. &c. &c., 508-24. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Bornou.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register; North in Blackwood's XV 84: 'every way worthy of Mr Barrow'; and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 5, and 9 in this Number. In a note on page 509, there is a specific reference to #578, an article by Barrow. In his QR articles, it was Barrow's signature practice to refer to his own works.

A 'Note.—In Continuation of Intelligence respecting the Interior of Africa' appears on pp. 597-98.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


693 Article 10. Francis Thackeray, A Defence of the Clergy of the Church of England: stating their Services, their Rights, and their Revenues; Campbell, An Appeal to the Gentlemen of England, on Behalf of the Church of England, 524-60. Author: Edward Edwards.

Running Title: Ecclesiastical Revenues.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Edwards, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Edward Edwards to WG, 23 Mar. 1823: speaks about his article on ecclesiastical revenues. Edwards emerges at this time as a literary advisor to John Murray and he published numerous articles in the QR under Coleridge and Lockhart, some on topics related to this one. Liverpool Library MS., Reginald Heber to an unidentified correspondent, 'Saturday,' [n.d. but c. 1823] asks for the loan of Dr. Cove on Ecclesiastical Revenues. The letter can be dated approximately from the following statement: 'I think it as well to add that in conversing yesterday with some literary men at the Bishop of London's.—I heard a very high Character of Mr Coleridge—after the reports wh. we heard this is very satisfactory, as, in such a quarter, a person of doubtful religious opinions wd certainly have not been so highly spoken of.' Coleridge was being considered for the editorship at this time by the QR's editorial coterie (to which Heber belonged). The article was reprinted, with changes, in an anonymous pamphlet, The Revenues of the Church of England Not a Burden upon the Public (London, 1830). Heber died in India 1826, making it less likely that the article is his. The article is referred to on p.493 of WI#39, which is attributed to G. A. Dealtry.

JM III's Register: attribution to Edwards, but without evidence.


694 Article 11. Extrait des Mémoires de M. le Duc de Rovigo, concernant la Catastrophe de M. le Duc d'Enghien; Marquart, Réfutation de l'Ecrit publié par le Duc de Rovigo sur la Catastrophe de M. le Duc d'Enghien; Touche, Extrait des Mémoires inédits sur la Révolution Française; Hulin, Explications offertes aux Hommes impartiaux; [Dupin] Pièces judiciaires et historiques relatives au Procès du Duc d'Enghien, 561-85. Author: John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Savary, and the Duke d'Enghien.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register; Brightfield 455; and North in Blackwood's XV 85. 
Shine quotes from the following two letters. Iowa MS., JM to John Wilson Croker [June 1823]: 'You have received I hope the Relation of Count Savary.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1823]: 'You forgot to tell me the name of the French work on which you wish to set Mr Croker.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in five of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles.

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence.

Published @ RC

February 2005

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