Vol 30. No. 59 - Index

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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 30 , NUMBER 59 (October 1823)


NOTES

  • This Number was published on or about 17 Apr. 1824 [Courier, 17 Apr. 1824; Murray MS., Bills: 19 Apr. 1824; Present writer's collection: Anne Cleaver, an original subscriber entered on the Contents page of her copy 'April 19. 1824'; Present writer's collection: the date on the QR's  original front wrapper reads 'April 1824']

  • This Number Sold about 14,000

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #705, #706

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 7

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 5

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


695 Article 1. Dwight, Travels in New England and New York, 1-40. Author: Robert Southey.

Running Title:  Dwight—Travels in New England and New York.

Notes: In attributing the article to Southey, Shine cites JM III's Register; Cottle 242-43; Southey 577; Warter III 417: (one offensive alteration by Gifford); Graham 10; and Clark 180-81, 184: 'most probably Southey's.' Shine says to see also Warter III  341, 405-6, 427; Southey 415. Shine quotes from BL MS. 28603 [no folio number given], Robert Southey to William Peachey, 4 Oct. 1823: 'I have now begun an article upon Dr Dwight's Travels in New England & New York.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. The article appears in Southey's definitive MS. list of his QR articles.

JM II's marked QR: 'Southey'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Southey, but without evidence. 


696 Article 2. William Stewart Rose, The Orlando Furioso. Translated into English Verse. Vol. I, 40-61. Author: John James Blunt, possibly.

Running Title: Rose's Orlando Furioso.

Notes: In attributing the article to Blunt, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1824]: 'I ... shall be glad to have the proof forwarded to Mr. Blunt.' Article #84WI refers to this article (specific reference to p.53, characteristics of a good translation), a circumstance that was, probably in error, appealed to in VPR 28 as evidence that Rose was the author of #696. Note by Anne Cleaver, an original subscriber, in her copy on page 61 QR Number 'Vol 2—was publishd [sic] April 1824.—' (Present writer's collection.) John Murray published the volume under review.

JM III's Register: attribution to 'Rev T J Blunt' [sic], but without evidence.


697 Article 3. [Sherer,] Recollections of the Peninsula. By the Author of Sketches in India; Campaign of the Left Wing of the Allied Army, in the Western Pyrenees and South of France, in the Years 1813-14; under Field-Marshal the Marquess of Wellington. Illustrated by a detailed Plan of the Operations, and numerous Plates of Mountain and River Scenery, drawn and etched by Captain Batty, of the First or Grenadier Guards, F.R.S., &c. &c, 61-79. Author: George Procter, probably.

Running Title: Recollections of the Peninsula, &c.

Notes: In attributing the article to Procter, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3 and 9 in this Number. During this period, military analysis was Procter's preserve in the QR

[Bookseller's note: 'This was a very popular adventure book in its day, describing the arduous life of a soldier serving with the Border Regiment in Portugal and Spain.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Procter, but without evidence.


698 Article 4. Belsham, The Epistles of Paul the Apostle translated, with an Exposition and Notes, 79-115. Author: Hugh James Rose.

Running Title: Belsham—Translation of St. Paul's Epistles.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Rose, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from the following two letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, Ramsgate [Aug. 1823]: 'Mr Roses address is / Revd H Rose / Horsham / Sussex.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Sept. 1823]: 'I am glad you have sent Belsham to Rose. I have not seen it, in slips.' In suggesting William Goodhugh as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., John Taylor Coleridge to JM, 10 Nov. 1825, asks if JM knows Rose, who wrote 'the Belsham article ... he lives at Horsham'.

JM III's Register: attribution to Rose, but without evidence.


699 Article 5. Brooke, Travels through Sweden, Norway, and Finmark to the North Cape, in the Summer of 1820, 115-33. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Brooke's Travels to the North Cape.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 5, 10, and 11 in this Number. The author comments on the possible conjunction of the Nile and the Niger, a preoccupation of Barrow's.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


700 Article 6. Facts and Observations respecting Intermittent Fevers, and the Exhalations which occasion them, collected chiefly on a Professional Mission to inquire and report on the Cause of the Sickness of the Army in Walcheren, in 1809, and to Northfleet, to report on the Expediency of establishing a Dock Yard and Naval Arsenal at that Place, in 1810. In 'Select Dissertations on several Subjects of Medical Science'; De Regionibus Italiœ Aëre pernicioso contaminatis Observationum quas Munia Professoris ordinarii publici in celeberrimâ Universitate Berolinensi subiens Commilitonibus Prodromi instar ad Lectiones de Epidemiis et Contagiis habendas offert Johannes Ferdinand Koreff, Dr. Med. et Chirurg. &c. &c.; Lecons sur les Epidémies et l'Hygiène Publique, faites à la Faculté de Médecine de Strasbourg. Par Fr. Emm. Foderé. Tome premier; Julia, Recherches Historiques, Chimiques et Médicales sur l'Air Marécageux, Ouvrage Couronné par l'Académie Royale des Sciences de Lyon, 133-51. Author: Robley Dunglisson, possibly, and possibly with John Barrow.

Running Title: Mal'aria.

Notes: In attributing the article to Dunglisson, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1823]: 'There was no need to trouble Barrow with Blane's perseverance, unless he remained unsatisfied[;] however, tis as well now the letter is gone.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the Murray MS. letter quoted by Shine does not support the attribution to Dunglisson.] 

The following information is published here for the first time. The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #986, Feb. 1822, probably by A. J. G. Marcet.

JM III's Register: attribution to 'Robley Dungleson,' but without evidence.


701 Article 7. Robinson, Memoirs of the Mexican Revolution and of General Mina; History of Guatimala, in Spanish America. Translated from the Spanish of Don Domingo Juarros, by J. Baily; Guerra, Historia de la Revolucion de Neuva España, ó verdadero Origen y Causas de ella, &c. &c.; Cancelada, Origen de la Espantosa Revolucion de Neuva España comenzada en Setiembre; Apuntes Historicos del Señor Villaurrautia, Vocal de las Cortes de España; Augila Mexicana, 151-85. Author: William Jacob.

Running Title: Mexico.

Notes: In attributing the article to Jacob, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following information and evidence appears here for the first time. Murray MS., William Jacob to JM, 17 Feb. 1824, unequivocally refers to his QR paper on Mexico. Guatemala is spelled in the article's head note as above. There is a reference on page 165 of this article to #691, which is possibly by Joseph Lowe.

[Booksellers' notes on Robinson: 'A highly important eyewitness account of Mexico during the late years of its wars for Independence. Robinson was one of the first U.S. writers on Mexican matters and here provides the first detailed information in English on General Mina's expedition against the royalist forces of Mexico, launched from the Southern U.S. Robinson also broaches here the possibility of a trans-isthmian canal through Nicaragua.' 'Important account of the Mexican Movement for Independence. Robinson was an American merchant who spent some years in Venezuela and Mexico, the latter during the time of which the events reported were occurring. He was generally badly treated by the Spaniards in control, and his sympathies are all for the Mexicans and their attempt to gain independence, which they did in 1821. His account may well be the first in English of this period; his relation of the expedition of Xavier Mina definitely is the first in English. Mina recruited among the southern states and a good part of his force was American. Both Streeter and Howes describe Mina's Expedition as in the nature of filibustering, but this is not right: he is more of a Mexican Lafayette, with the difference that his efforts came to nothing, and he was shot. Robinson also was one of the first to broach the possibility of a transoceanic canal across Nicaragua, following the river Chagres. The book was published in 2 volumes in London the next year, and into Dutch, German and Spanish in 1823 - 24.' 'A native of Philadelphia, he was a merchant who travelled throughout northern Latin America as a tobacco buyer, getting into trouble just about every place he went. He actively participated in the Mexican Wars of Independence on the side of the insurgents, and was captured and imprisoned several times. His narrative is included in Streeter's Texas bibliography because of the contemporary account of Gen. Mina's expedition from Galveston Island to Soto la Marina, and their subsequent march into Mexico. This is a fine eyewitness account.']

Mexico is the subject of a review in Eclectic Review #78, Aug. 1824, probably by Josiah Conder.

JM III's Register: attribution to Jacob, but without evidence.


702 Article 8. Johnson, Private Correspondence of William Cowper, 185-99. Author: John Philips Potter, possibly.

Running Title: Private Correspondence of Cowper.

Notes: In attributing the article to Potter, Shine cites only JM III's Register. In suggesting Reginald Heber as an alternative attribution, Shine cites Graham 41 and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579, 'implies Heber's authorship'. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, Ramsgate, [July 1823]: 'I desired the Bishop of Calcutta [Heber] to leave his fragments with you.—Has he done it? I fear not, as you do not mention it.' It is not clear why Shine applies this evidence to #702 and not to an article, such as #655, that was published much closer to the date of this letter.

The following information and evidence is published here for the first time. This article is referred to at #721, which is also possibly by Potter. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in New Monthly Magazine #547, Jan. 1824, by an unidentified writer and in Eclectic Review #24, Mar. 1824, probably by Josiah Conder.

JM III's Register: attribution to 'a friend of Mr Senior, Rev. Potter,' but without evidence.


703 Article 9. Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan, 199-216. Author: George Procter, probably.

Running Title: Adventures of Hajji Baba.

Notes: In attributing the article to Procter, Shine cites only JM III's Register. 

The following information and evidence appears here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3 and 9 in this Number. In a note on page 212, the article's author refers to page 449 of #594, which is probably by William Gilly. The volume under review was published by John Murray.

[Booksellers' notes, silently modified: 'The Adventures of Hajji Baba … became known to a large part of the world as a classic to be compared with Burton's Arabian Nights. Indeed, the publishers were surprised to find … there existed in this country several "Hajji Baba" clubs, numbering hundreds of members. Earlier in life, Morier served in the British diplomatic service in Persia and published two important accounts of his travels: Journey through Persia, Armenia, and Asia Minor to Constantinople in the Years 1808 and 1809 (1812) and A Second Journey through Persia (1818). After his return to England, Morier embarked on a successful literary career, completing several popular novels set in the Middle East. The "Hajji Baba" stories reflect his intimate knowledge of the manners and customs of the region and remain his best-remembered works. They contributed to Sir Walter Scott's assessment of Morier as the greatest novelist of the day.']

The subject of this article was reviewed in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine #5, Jan. 1824, by Henry Thomson, and in New Monthly Magazine #573, Mar. 1824, by an unidentified writer.

JM III's Register: attribution to 'Capt Procter,' but without evidence. 


704 Article 10. Burridge, Naval Dry Rot, &c. &c. &c. (The title would fill a page.), 216-30. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Dry Rot.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles I 284; and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 5, 10, and 11 in this Number. Public Record Office (Kew), ADM 1 / 4371: the pamphlet in the article's head note is among the papers of the Secretaries of the Admiralty (Croker and Barrow). The article's author makes a specific reference on page 224 to QR articles #208, #260, #320, all of which are by Barrow. On its first page, the author of the article alludes to the QR's series of articles in which the problem of dry rot is addressed; all of these articles were written by John Barrow. The series includes #208, #245, #260, #280, #297, #320, #328, #514, #704, and #341WI. On page 229, the article's author makes a specific reference to #678 and states that as author of that article he had received via the publisher of the QR correspondence from a person mentioned in that review. It was Barrow's signature practice in his QR articles to refer to his own works. The sentence in parenthesis appears in the article's head note as above. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


705 Article 11. Parry, Journal of a Second Voyage for the Discovery of a North-West Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific; performed in the Years 1821-22-23, in His Majesty's Ships Fury and Hecla, under the Orders of Captain W. E. Parry, R.N., F.R.S. Illustrated by numerous Plates, 231-72. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: North-West Passage—Parry's Second Voyage.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites JM III's Register and Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 5, 10, and 11 in this Number. Barrow's series of articles in the QR on polar exploration includes #451, #474, #503, #585, #667, #705, #97WI, and #163WI. At pages 233 and 265 of #705, the author of the article alludes to his former articles in the QR on Captain Ross (#451 and #503), both of which are by Barrow. On page 234 the author refers to #667, an article by Barrow. Article #705 and the other QR articles on Parry, #585 and #97WI, are claimed by Barrow in #163WI. It was Barrow's signature practice in his QR articles to refer to his own works. John Murray published the volume under review.

[Bookseller's note: 'Interesting account of the second voyage of Sir William Edward Parry (1790-1855) to the Arctic regions, in search of the North-West Passage. Parry was one of the earliest and greatest explorers of the Arctic. He commanded five expeditions to the Arctic between 1818 and 1827, and reached farther north than any other explorer to that time. Parry did not get as far as the Bering Straits in his expedition, but he reached Melville Island, a point which even 75 years later, with the aid of steam, had not been passed. It was not until 1852 that McClure, coming from the opposite direction, and reaching a point on the north of Banks Land, which Parry had seen and named, was able to connect the two positions by passing on foot across ice, showing positively that the North West Passage was not blocked by land. This book records the events of his second voyage, which was not as successful as the first, but contains important information on Eskimo life. The work is a treatise on aboriginal life, rather than a narrative of scientific discoveries. Particularly clear and vivid are the numerous engraved plates. In the back of the book is a series of excellent and very detailed maps. Pp. 559-571 contain a vocabulary of Eskimo words and sentences.']

The subject of this article was reviewed in Eclectic Review #75, Aug. 1824, by John Ryley, and in New Monthly Magazine, May 1824, by an unidentified writer.

JM II's marked QR: 'Barrow.'

 JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


706 Article 12. Observations on the Judges of the Court of Chancery, and the Practice and Delays complained of in that Court, 272-91. Author: John Wilson Croker, probably with —— Wright.

Running Title: Court of Chancery.

Notes:  In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 455. 

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in six of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. Murray MS., John Wilson Croker to JM, 4 Apr. 1824 and Murray MS., Croker to JM, May 1824, in which Croker discusses the article as his.

[Bookseller's note: 'A conservative response to widespread calls for judicial reform; the writer is highly critical of the propensity for "lawyers by profession to attack, in our days, not only one of the first and most distinguished courts of judicature in the kingdom, but even the judgment and integrity of the first and ablest Law Officer of the Crown." Dedicated to Richard Preston, a highly successful Devonshire conveyance attorney (see DNB), who also was very conservative in his approach to the law.']

 JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, citing unspecified letters, and note: 'with valuable information from Mr Wright a barrister.'

Published @ RC

February 2005

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