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Quarterly Review Archive

Quarterly Review
VOLUME 30 , NUMBER 60 (January 1824)


NOTES

  • This Number was published 28 Aug. 1824 [Courier advertisement, 28 Aug. 1824]

  • This Number Sold about 7000

  • Gifford told Canning that this would be his last Number, though, Gifford complained, Murray still 'fondly' thought he might proceed 'a little and yet a little further.'

  • Harewood MS., Lord Liverpool to George Canning, [26?] Apr. 1824: 'Most Private. I return Gifford's letter. The Fall of the Quarterly Review would be a serious calamity, and we must devise some means of keeping it up.'

  • An editor's note appears on page 587 of this Number correcting a misstatement in #629. Murray MS., WG to JM, [10 Aug. 1824 postmark]: 'I have also put up something to be added at the end of the No. for Mr Rogers, as Barrow promised. As soon as it is set up send it to him .... Be as civil as you like.'

  • Colonel William Leake appears to have submitted an article on a topic to be covered by Barrow. He proposes that D'Oyly should amalgamate the two submissions [Murray MS., Leake to JM, 18 June 1824]

  • Important or otherwise interesting articles in this Number include: #707, #719

  • Number of definite attributions for this issue: 12

  • Number of probable or possible attributions for this issue: 1

CONTENTS, IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRIBUTORS, AND HISTORICAL NOTES


707  Article 1. [McCulloch,] Essay on Political Economy. Supplement to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Vol. VI. Part I, 297-334. Author: Thomas Robert Malthus.

Running Title: Political Economy.

Notes: In attributing the article to Malthus, Shine cites JM III's Register; Bonar 212n; Ricardo-Malthus 179n; and DNB. Shine says to see also Levy 374 note 177f.

The following information is published here for the first time. The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1120, Nov. 1825, by Francis Jeffrey. QR #707 was criticized in Westminster Review, #58, Jan., 1825, by John Stuart Mill. An earlier article on James Mill and political economy appeared in the same journal, #38, Oct. 1824, by William Ellis. Another article on McCulloch and political economy appeared in that journal, #76, July 1825, by John Stuart Mill and William Ellis. John Murray published Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population (enlarged, in 3 vols. 1817); An Inquiry into the Nature and Progress of Rent and the Principles by which it is Regulated (1815); The Grounds of an Opinion on the Policy of Restricting the Importation of Foreign Corn, Intended as an Appendix to "Observations on the Corn Laws" (1815); Statements Respecting the East-India College, with an Appeal to Facts, in Refutation of the Charges Lately Brought Against it in the Court of Proprietors (1817); Additions to the Fourth and Former Editions of an Essay on the Principle of Population, etc. (1817); The Principles of Political Economy Considered with a View to their Practical Application (1820); The Measure of Value Stated and Illustrated, with an Application of it to the Alterations in the Value of the English Currency since 1790 (1823); Definitions in Political Economy, Preceded by an Inquiry into the Rules which Ought to Guide Political Economists in the Definition and Use of their Terms; with Remarks on the Derivation from these Rules in their Writings (1827); and A Summary View of the Principle of Population [an abridged version of his article on "Population" in the Supplement to the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Editions of the Encyclopaedia Britannica] (1830).

JM III's Register: attribution to Malthus, but without evidence. 


708  Article 2. Meyrick, A Critical Inquiry into Ancient Armour, as it existed in Europe, but particularly in England, from the Norman Conquest to the Reign of King Charles II, with a Glossary of Military Terms, &c, 334-51. Author: George Procter.

Running Title: Meyrick—On Ancient Armour.

Notes: In attributing the article to Procter, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following information and evidence is published here for the first time. The article's author refers to #580, which is also by Procter. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1049, Jan. 1824, by John Henry Barrow.

[Bookseller's note, silently modified: 'Samuel Meyrick (1783-1848), was born into a family with a commercial tradition as agents to the British Army. His father, John, passed on to him a love of military ceremonial, archery, and the collecting of antiquities, including arms and armour. Samuel began to collect pieces of armour and study them, becoming enough of an authority to advise theatre producers on costume and help artists lend authenticity to their paintings. As his growing collection began to attract attention, he received visits from George IV, from famous artists, and from Sir Walter Scott. Eventually he was asked to rearrange the armour at the Tower of London and at Windsor Palace. He was later knighted. His reputation was made with the publication of A Critical Inquiry, a sumptuous production with the plates coloured by R. Bridgens after drawings by the author and Charles Hamilton Smith, with whom he had collaborated on The Costume of the Original Inhabitants of the British Isles.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Procter, but without evidence.


709  Article 3. White, History of a Voyage to the China Sea, 351-68. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Cambodia.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 4, and 9 in this Number. 

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1082, Oct. 1824, by Hugh Murray and in Eclectic Review #136, Jan. 1825, probably by Josiah Conder.

[Booksellers' notes: 'Captain White sailed from Salem for the Far East in 1819. His was among the first American vessels to ascend the Dong Nai River to Saigon, and he spent a considerable amount of time in that city. His account includes a great deal of information on Vietnam and the Vietnamese, and on Batavia and the Philippines.' 'Written by a Lieutenant in the United States Navy, this volume was not originally intended for publication, but written as a Memoir to be deposited in the archives of the "East India Marine Society of Salem." Includes a lovely fold-out map of the river Don-Nai, from Cape St. James to the City of Saigon, as well as several outstanding etchings.' 'The White narrative is a rare book, and an important one. White sailed from Salem in 1819 on a joint venture with the brig Franklin and the ship Marmion to Cochin China.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


710  Article 4. Dupin, Voyages dans la Grande-Bretagne, entrepris relativement aux Services Publics de la Guerre, de la Marine, et des Ponts et Chausées, depuis 1816. Troisieme Partie, FORCE COMMERCIALE, 368-82. Author: John Barrow.

Running Title: Dupin—Commercial Power of England.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 4, and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., Richard Chenevix to WG, n.d. [c. July 1823], proposes articles on Dupin and escaped French prisoners, a topic discussed by Barrow in #600. The article's author refers to article #514, which is by Barrow, and #580, an article by Procter. In a footnote on page 60, there is a specific reference to #328, an article by Barrow.

[Bookseller's note, silently modified: 'Charles Dupin (1784-1873). His study of the technical installations and public works of the United Kingdom includes important contemporary information on the transport system and its maintenance, with substantial chapters on Scottish canals and ports. The first part of the work is devoted to a detailed study of the army and navy and their installations, training, and weaponry. When he began to gather material for his work, Dupin had been faced with some opposition by the British authorities, who feared that sensitive information might be used by the French military, but later they conceded the scientific interest of his work, and allowed him to continue. He places particular emphasis on the canal network and includes detailed descriptions of all the major routes through the towns and cities of Great Britain. At this time canals were the main form of transport; the railway network was in its early stages. He also discusses the maintenance and building of bridges, in particular in London. Dupin gives detailed histories of the construction of the bridges of Westminster, Blackfriars and the Strand. In the final volume, Dupin discusses the ports of the British Isles. He studies the design and construction of the ports in general and then details all the major ports of England, Scotland and Wales with short histories of each.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence.


711  Article 5. Smyth, Memoir descriptive of the Resources, Inhabitants, and Hydrography of Sicily and its Islands, interspersed with Antiquarian and other Notices, 382-403. Author: John James Blunt.

Running Title: Smyth—Sicily and its Islands.

Notes: In attributing the article to Blunt, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [May 1824]: 'I ... shall be glad to have the proof forwarded to Mr Blunt.'

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Murray MS., John James Blunt to JM, 23 July 1823, and Blunt to JM, 30 April 1824, Blunt will write an article on 'Smyth's Italy'. In a footnote on p. 382, there is a specific reference to #196, a review by John Wilson Croker. John Murray published the volume under review.

JM III's Register: attribution to 'Rev J J Blunt,' but without evidence.


712  Article 6. An Act for Consolidating and Amending the Laws relating to the Building, Repairing, and Regulating of Certain Gaols and Houses of Correction in England and Wales. 4 G. IV. c. 64. 10th July, 1823; First, Second, and Third Reports from the Committee on the Laws relating to Penitentiary Houses; Report from the Committee on the State of the Gaols of the City of London, &c.; First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Reports from the Committee of the Society for the Improvement of Prison Discipline; Roscoe on Penal Jurisprudence; Roscoe's Additional Observations on Penal Jurisprudence, &c.; Speech of G. Holford, Esq. on the Motion made by him in the House of Commons, June 1814, for Leave to bring a Bill for the better Management of the Prisons belonging to the City of London; Speech of G. Holford, Esq. in the House of Commons, June 22d, 1815, on the Bill to amend the Laws relative to the Transportation of Offenders, containing Provisions respecting the Confinement of Offenders in the Hulks; Speech of G. Holford, Esq. in Support of an Amendment, to withhold from the Visiting Justices of Prisons the Power of authorizing the Employment without their own Consent of Prisoners committed for Trial; Thoughts on the Criminal Prisons of this Country, &c.; A Short Vindication of the General Penitentiary at Millbank, &c.; Buxton, An Inquiry whether Crime and Misery are produced or prevented by our present System of Prison Discipline; Hippesley, Correspondence on Prison Labour; Thoughts on Prison Labour, &c., &c., By a Student of the Inner Temple; Rules and Regulations of the General Penitentiary, Millbank; Report on the Penitentiary at Millbank,404-40. Author: John Taylor Coleridge.

Running Title: Prisons and Penitentiaries.

Notes: In attributing the article to George Taylor, Shine cites Surtees xiv. In suggesting John Taylor Coleridge as an alternative attribution, Shine cites JM III's Register and quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 22 July 1824: 'Mr C is too long, & I am sorry for it. I will go to work upon it immediately, & he must see it again, if he happens then to be in town .... we can only wait till Mr C's Art is ready for press...' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: the letter may instead allude to #717, with 'Mr C' being John Wilson Croker.] 

The following information and some of the following evidence was first published in VPR 28. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: Murray paid £50 for article 6 in Number 60. Murray MS., WG to John Taylor Coleridge, 31 Aug. 1824, says he has £50 for him. Bodleian MS. d. 130 (ff.68-69), Thomas Arnold to John Taylor Coleridge, 12 Oct. 1823: 'I am very glad to hear that you are busy about Prison Discipline ....' BL Add. MS. 47553 (ff. 32-33), Robert Southey to John Taylor Coleridge, 21 Oct. 1823 [postmark: 27 October 1823]: 'As you are writing about Penitentiaries, I will tell you what my brother Henry says to me in his last letter concerning the one at Millbank, where he is now officially employed.' This letter is published in W. Brakeman, 'Letters by Robert Southey to Sir John Taylor Coleridge,' Studia Germanica 6 (1964) 103-230. The letter as transcribed in Brakeman is cited in Wellesley Index II. Wellesley Index II states, 'Regarding the attr. to George Taylor, 1772-1851, in Index I, the source given (Surtees, p. xiv.) was apparently an error, but he may have had some hand in it.' Wellesley Index does not support its assertion that Taylor may have had a hand in the article. 

Article #712 was attacked in a review of James Mill's Prisons and Prison Discipline in Westminster Review #66, Apr. 1825, by an unidentified writer. 

[Bookseller's note on Buxton: 'Contains descriptions of the Borough Compter; the jails at St. Albans, Guildford, Bristol, Bury and Ilchester; the Tothill Fields Prison, the Maison de Force at Ghent; the Philadelphia Prison; the penitentiary at Millbank; and the proceedings of the Ladies' Committee at Newgate—all save the description of the Philadelphia Prison being firsthand accounts. Buxton was a prominent early 19th century British social reformer. This, his first book, led to the creation of the Society for the Reformation of Prison Discipline and considerably influenced the amelioration of prison conditions.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Coleridge, but without evidence.


713  Article 7. Schmidtmeyer, Travels to Chile, over the Andes, in the Years 1820 and 1821; Graham, Journal of a Residence in Chili during the Year 1822, and a Voyage from Chili to Brasil in 1823; Hall, Extracts from a Journal written on the Coasts of Chile, Peru, and Mexico, in the Years 1820, 1821 and 1822, 441-72. Author: William Jacob, possibly, and possibly with John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Chili, Peru, &c.

Notes: In attributing the article to Jacob, Shine cites JM III's Register. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [July 1824]: 'By way of saving time I send a few pages of America—let them be revised as soon as possible, & then put into Mr C [pencil notation on letter in another hand: 'Coleridge?'] hands as I should wish him to have the final view. This critique is very amusing. I am sorry it is so long.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: as Shine suggests, 'Mr C' here more likely refers to John Wilson Croker than to John Taylor Coleridge.]

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Compare #720, which reviews another work by Graham and may also be by Jacob. Brazil is spelled in the article's head note as above.

[Bookseller's note on Hall: 'Captain Hall, a curious, good-humoured, and open-minded English observer remembered for his later Travels in North America, here records his impressions of the countryside, customs, and social and intellectual lives of the areas he visited in South America and Mexico, which included Valparaiso, Lima, Santiago, Talcuhuana, Arauco, Guayaquil, Panama, and Acapulco. The sketches are strongly and consistently critical of Spain's government of her colonies, though admiring of the fundamental "excellent character of the Spaniards." Hall's journal was first published in 1824; [a] fifth edition was the second volume issued in "Constable's miscellany of original and selected publications in the various departments of literature, science, and the arts" series.']

JM III's Register: attribution to Jacob, but without evidence.


714  Article 8. Hone, Aspersions Answered: an Explanatory Statement addressed to the Public at large, and to every Reader of the Quarterly Review in particular, 472-81. Author: Hugh James Rose, probably.

Running Title: Hone—Aspersions Answered.

Notes: In attributing the article to Rose, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following information is published here for the first time. The article defends #589, which is by Rose. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Rose, but without evidence. 


715  Article 9. Mengin, Histoire de l'Egypte, sous le Gouvernement de Mohammed-Aly, ou Récit des Evènemens politiques et militaires, qui ont eu lieu depuis le Départ de Français jusqu'en 1823, 481-508. Author: John Barrow, with information from an unnamed correspondent, possibly Henry Salt.

Running Title: Modern Egypt.

Notes: In attributing the article to Barrow, Shine cites only JM III's Register.

The following evidence and information is published here for the first time. Murray MS., Cash Book 1821-24: the same person was paid for articles 3, 4, and 9 in this Number. Murray MS., WG to JM, 10 July 1824: 'I have done with Egypt. It is an important Art. indeed too important to be rashly handled, and our friend is the most clashing of all politicians—nothing stands in his way. I have tried to make it safe—still it is sufficiently querulous.' Murray MS., John Barrow to JM, 30 Apr. 1824, refers to the article as his. The author of the article states on page 482: 'To these notices we are enabled to add, from documents in our possession, some circumstances of considerable interest, from a source equally authentic.' At about this time, Henry Salt was in communication with Murray and Barrow about Egypt. Salt is mentioned on page 491. The author alludes to an unnamed 'correspondent' on that same page.

JM III's Register: attribution to Barrow, but without evidence. 


716  Article 10. Landor, Imaginary Conversations of Literary Men and Statesmen, 508-19. Author: Henry Taylor, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Landor—Imaginary Conversations.

Notes: In co-attributing the article to Taylor and Gifford, Shine cites JM III's Register; Taylor I 79; Southey 430: 'parts struck out by Gifford'; Graham 41; Taylor; Clark 235. Shine also quotes from Murray MS., WG to JM, [22 July 1824 postmark]: 'Let Mr Taylor have a copy of the Revise by all means—but if he has any thing to say he must be brief & quick. ... I hope he will think I have improved it. He is a nice young man, & should be encouraged.'

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1059, Mar. 1824, by William Hazlitt, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine #49, Apr. 1824, possibly by John Wilson, and in Westminster Review #19, Apr. 1824, possibly by Peregrine Bingham.

JM III's Register: attribution to Taylor, but without evidence


717  Article 11. [Paulding,] A Sketch of Old England by a New Englandman, in a Series of Letters to his Brother, 519-42. Author: John Wilson Croker, with William Gifford.

Running Title: Sketch of Old England.

Notes: In attributing the article to Croker, Shine cites JM III's Register and Brightfield 455. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, [22 July 1824 postmark]: 'Mr C is too long, & I am sorry for it. I will go to work upon it immediately, & he must see it again, if he happens then to be in town ... we can only wait till Mr C's Art is ready for press.' Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 31 July 1824: 'I return part of Paulding. Looking again at the book, I have added now & then a word. Let Croker see the whole for good and all. Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'I sent by yesterday's post Mr Croker's revise, with my own remarks—till I get it back, I cannot finish the enclosed for the press;—it is only the last leaf that I want again. Do not trouble our friend with the Revise till I have gone thro it, and then he must look at it for good and all.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'I put Mr C revise [sic], a most ridiculous passage that struck me in Paulding. I care nothing about its appearance, and if it occasions any delay throw it into the fire,—as, indeed, I desired Mr C to do.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'All that I do this morning is to return Mr C's revise for press. I have added a bit of note—but if room cannot be found for it without trouble, let it alone. It was lucky you sent on the book, for I had misunderstood two or three of Mr C's quotations—for want of some leading word. Our friend is well pleased and indeed I think his Art lively and amusing—and it is certainly useful. / It can do no harm to forward a copy of the revise to Mr Ellis—I can go on with mine again—& if anything comes in time so much the better.' [Quarterly Review Archive editor's note: unnoted by Shine, in his reference to Ellis here WG shifts his attention to #719.]

The following evidence is published here for the first time. Claimed by Croker in six of his Clements Library MS. lists and included in the Cambridge University bound volumes of Croker's articles. 

JM III's Register: attribution to Croker, but without evidence. 


718  Article 12. Letters to and from Henrietta, Countess of Suffolk, and her Second Husband, the Hon. George Berkeley, from 1712 to 1767. With Historical, Biographical, and Explanatory Notes, 542-59. Author: Walter Scott, with John Wilson Croker.

Running Title: Correspondence of Lady Suffolk.

Notes: In attributing the article to Scott, Shine cites JM III's Register; Smiles II 159; Scott; Gentleman's Magazine XXI 579; Douglas II 186, 213-14, 214n; Clark 232; and Brightfield 291, 291n. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 9 Aug. 1824: '... I expected every day Scott's Art which did not reach me till yesterday's post ... a clever, sensible thing; very good in the view which he takes—but perhaps not so agreeable as a more popular & more light review might have proved—tis however the work of  a man who knows what he is about. Little or nothing can be done to it, on acct of its compact & dry manner—as indeed I know my friend to be so sore that I am not sorry to have so little to do.... two [sheets] will have the extracts if any be given, which Scott has given little or no opening for, and may not perhaps much approve, when inserted.' Murray MS. WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 10 Aug. 1824: 'I have sent ... the remaining slips of the Suffolk Letters, with several papers marked for extracts.... When they are printed, let Mr Croker see them, and add or diminish or take the whole away, at his pleasure .... it is impossible to say which Scott would have chosen. I think I have touched upon the least objectionable, & at the same time, given a variety of styles .. let M C decide .. There is much in the Art. to be praised.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'I see from our friends letter that he is very desirous of Sir Walter's appearance .... Let it follow Paulding, for it seems that Mr C does not mean to let Sir Walter see it again.' Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: '... who would have thought of Scott & other delays?' John Murray published the volume under review. 

[Bookseller's note, silently modified: 'Henrietta Howard (1688-1767) became the mistress of George II in about 1720; the relationship ended in the 1730s. She was on friendly terms with Pope, Gay, Chesterfield, Swift, and Walpole. Croker’s editorial work is very good, though perhaps rather more tactful than it needed to be.']

[Bookseller's note on Stephen, with additions: 'James Stephen (1759-1832) was an English lawyer and a key member of the abolitionist movement. He held an official post in St. Kitts. His experiences in the West Indies turned him against slavery His account of the legal framework supporting and defining the institution of slavery is chilling.' With his Evangelical and philanthropic friends William Wilberforce, Henry Thornton, Zachary Macaulay, and John Shore, Lord Teignmouth, Stephen was one of the so-called Saints, a parliamentary pressure group who were important early supporters of the Quarterly Review.]

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1061, Mar. 1824, by G. J. W. Agar-Ellis and in New Monthly Magazine #610, June 1824, by an unidentified writer.

JM III's Register: attribution to Scott, but without evidence.


719  Article 13. Canning, Speech of the Right Honourable George Canning, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, on Wednesday, the 17th of March, 1824; to which is added an Order in Council for Improving the Condition of the Slaves in Trinidad; Negro Slavery, published by the Sunday School Tract Society; Stephen, The Slavery of the British West India Colonies delineated as it exists both in Law and Practice, as compared with the Slavery of other Countries, Ancient and Modern; M'Queen, The West India Colonies; the Calumnies and Misrepresentations circulated against them by the Edinburgh Review, Mr. Clarkson, Mr. Cropper, &c. &c. examined and refuted; Hampden, A Commentary on Mr. Clarkson's Pamphlet entitled Thoughts on the Necessity of improving the Condition of the Slaves in the British Colonies, with a View to their ultimate Emancipation; First Report of the New York Colonization Society; Yates, Colonial Slavery. Letters to the Right Honourable William Huskisson, President of the Board of Trade, &c. &c. on the Present Condition of the Slaves, and the Means best adapted to promote the Mitigation and final Extinction of Slavery in the British Colonies; Report of a Committee of the Council of Barbadoes, appointed to inquire into the Actual Condition of the Slaves in this Island, with a View to refute certain Calumnies respecting their Treatment; and also to take into Consideration certain Measures affecting the West Indies, which have been lately agitated in the House of Commons, 560-87. Author: Robert John Wilmot Horton and Charles Rose Ellis, with Robert William Hay, and others.

Running Title: West India Colonies.

Notes:  In co-attributing the article to Horton and Ellis (with the attribution to Ellis queried), Shine cites JM III's Register for Horton. Shine also quotes from the following letters. Murray MS. WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 22 July 1824: '... I return by the coach the Revise of the West Indies, for which we are greatly obliged to my kind friend. Pray send it to Rowarth [the printer] immediately & let it be corrected without loss of time. Let me have 2 copies, for what I have by me is so scratched and bedeviled that the mother who bore it, would not know it. Mr <Ws> ['or Mr H's' inserted above line: i.e., Wilmot, Horton, or Wilmot-Horton] revise is not worth a single farthing. I think the paper will be important.' Murray MS., WG to JM, postmarked Ramsgate, 10 Aug. 1824: 'I shall send the West Indies this week. If Mr <E> comes, so much the better; but we need not wait. Murray MS., WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'It can do no harm to forward a copy of the revise to Mr Ellis—I can go on with mine again—& if anything comes in time so much the better—Where Mr Wilmot is I do not know.' Murray MS. WG to JM, [Aug. 1824]: 'I enclose Wilmot, which is a sound & useful paper —Thanks in the first place to our good friend C.E. I think Wilmot cannot have much to do to it ....' Murray MS., WG to JM, Ramsgate, Sunday, [Aug. 1824]: 'I only wait for Mr Wilmot, who I hope will not meddle with what is done; but content himself with additions—if he has anything important to say.'

The following information and evidence is published here for the first time. Iowa MS., JM to [Croker], [31 Mar. 1823]: 'I have just seen Mr Wilmot who has undertaken to favour me with an article on O'Meara & when you come back we will give him materials—a Pamphlet from America, I conceive, is advertised for the 1st of April.' Murray MS., WG to John Taylor Coleridge, 9 Dec. 1823, on the subject of the West Indies trade, says 'I shall see Mr C. Ellis again soon, & I will then ascertain his opinion of the subject of a new writer. Materials he will furnish, i.e. estimates &c.' Murray MS., Robert Wilmot Horton to JM, 16 June 1824, says he would like to write two or three articles on political subjects, especially the West Indian question. Murray MS., WG to JM, 10 July 1824: 'I have not yet received the American paper—I hope it is not given up.' Murray MS., WG to JM, July 1824: 'You have not sent me the whole of America ... nor mentioned whether Mr C[roker] has revised what is forwarded. I do not understand Wilmot's note. Has neither he nor Hay seen the proofs? It will be to no purpose to look at it till the revise reaches me.'. Murray MS, Wilmot Horton to JM, 28 Aug. 1824, sends the cheque back, to be placed on account. '[T]he article on the West Indies I dictated to a short-hand writer sent me confidentially by Mr. Gurney.' Murray MS., Wilmot Horton to WG, 20 Oct. 1824: says that he hears 'a good deal of interest among those persons who are connected with Abolition & West India affairs' and that in the New Times a series of articles has been published attacking it under the signature 'Anglus'. In the Star 'Vindex' has defended the article. Proposes to bring Vindex together in a pamphlet that could then be the subject of an article in the QR. Fetter note: This article was criticized in an anonymous pamphlet, Review of the Quarterly Review; or an Exposure of the Erroneous Opinions Promulgated in That Work on the Subject of Colonial Slavery (London, 1824).

The subject of this article was reviewed in ER #1086, Oct. 1824, by Henry Brougham, in New Monthly Magazine #571, Mar. 1824, by Cyrus Redding, in Westminster Review #15, Apr. 1824, by William Ellis, in the same journal in #32, July 1824, by Peregrine Bingham, in Eclectic Review #13, Feb. 1824, probably by Josiah Conder, and #33, Mar. 1824, also probably by Josiah Conder.

JM III's Register: attribution to Wilmot Horton, but without evidence.

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