Byron, 1997

WORKS: COLLECTED, SELECTED, SINGLE , TRANSLATED

Byron, George Gordon. Lord Byron: Selected Poetry. Ed. Jerome J. McGann. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1997.

Byron, George Gordon. Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte and Don Juan Canto VIII and Stanzas from III and IX: Illustrating Byron's Attitudes Toward Napoleon, Wellington, and War. Ed. Cheryl Fallon Giuliano. New York: Garland, 1997.

Byron, George Gordon. Poemes. Ed. Florence Guilhot and Jean-Louis Paul. Paris: Ed. Allia, 1997.

Stephens, John Richard, ed. Vampires, Wine, & Roses. New York: Berkley Books, 1997.

Includes an excerpt of Byron's The Giaour.

"Where Daylight Fails." Parabola, 22 (1997): 83-84.

A collection of quotations, including a segment of Byron's poem "Darkness."

Wood, Hugh. Lines to Mr. Hodgson: Written on Board the Lisbon Packet by Lord Byron, Falmouth Roads, June 30, 1809: 30 March-11 April, 1988. London: Chester Music, 1997.

Musical score.

Books and Articles Relating to Byron

Adams, Bernard. "Some Lost Images of Byron." BJ 25 (1997): 101-3.

Auchincloss, Eric. "Byron's Weight." TLS 4896 (Jan. 31, 1997): 15.

Letter to the editor which describes Byron's height of 5 feet 8 1/2 inches as average for his time. Byron's weight fluctuated from 150 to 203 pounds.

Beevers, Robert. "George Sanders and the Byronic Image." Apollo 146 (Sept. 1997): 37-42.

Bidney, Martin. "Motsas for Lord Byron: The Judeo-British Literary Persona of Isaac Nathan." BJ 25 (1997): 60-71.

Bull, Cornelius. "Open Thy Byron." NYTBR (Jan. 5, 1997): 4.

Buss, Louis. The Luxury of Exile. London: J. Cape, 1997.

Cardwell, Richard. "Bloom, Bakhtin, and Byron's Don Juan." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 209-27.

Cardwell discusses Byron's use of dialogic discourse in Don Juan.

Cardwell, Richard, ed. Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society. Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997.

Essays by Thèrése Tessiére, Afrim Karagjozi, M. Byron Raizis, Martin Prochàzka, Werner Huber, Malcolm Kelsall, Caroline Franklin, Ghislaine McDayter, Roger Poole, and Richard A. Cardwell.

Carroll, Alicia. "The Giaour's Campaign: Desire and the Other in Felix Holt, the Radical." Novel 30 (1997): 237-58.

 

Christensen, Jerome. "Marino Faliero and the Fault of Byron's Satire." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 117-32.

Christie, William. "Byron and Francis Jeffrey." BJ 25 (1997): 32-43.

Christie, William. "Running with the English Hares and Hunting with the Scotch Bloodhounds." BJ 25 (1997): 23-31.

Clubbe, John. "Napoleon's Last Campaign and the Origins of Don Juan." BJ 25 (1997): 12-22.

Crompton, Louis. Byron & Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th Century England. Berkeley: U. of California P, 1985. Rept. Swaffham: GMP, 1998.

Dokou, Christina. "Androgyny's Challenge to the 'Law of the Father': Don Juan as Epic in Reverse." Mosaic 30.3 (1997): 1-19.

Douglass, Paul. "Playing Byron: Lady Caroline Lamb's Glenarvon and the Music of Isaac Nathan." ERR 8 (1997): 1-24.

Eggleton, David. "Satanic Majesty." New Zealand Listener (May 10, 1997): 46.

"After 200 years Byron still refuses to be cut down to size."

England, A. B. "Byron's Marino Faliero and the Force of Individual Agency." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 87-116.

Erdman, David V. "Byron's Stage Fright: The History of His Ambition and Fear of Writing for the Stage." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 5-32.

Evans, Greg. "Dealer's Choice." Variety (Apr. 14, 1997): 100.

Flake, Timothy H. "Byronic Heroism in the Island." BJ 25 (1997): 44-59.

Foot, Michael. "Labour's Ex-leader Speaks about Parliament, Tony Blair, Rupert Murdoch, and Byron. Interview." New Statesman (Jan. 10, 1997): 30-31.

Byron is "a cure for all modern ills" (31).

Franklin, Caroline. "Cosmopolitan Masculinity and the British Female Reader of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 105-25.

Franklin concentrates on misogynist elements of cantos I and II of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, while offering a reading of all four cantos of the work. In this important article, Franklin argues that "The poem's insistently masculinist focus, demonstrated in the gendered way it constructs the implied reader in both the epic quest and the interpolated lyrics, and in presenting as universal a definitively masculine poetic consciousness objectifying a female nature and a feminized Italy, testifies that the poet functions as an authority on Europe only insofar as he construes the feminine as oppositional" (124). Franklin argues that Byron's "republicanism was patriarchal in nature, assuming a leadership from the top down, determined by right of birth--in class and gender--as had appertained in the classical republics he idealized" (123). Franklin is nevertheless intrigued by the question of why Childe Harold appealed to, and continues to appeal to, a female readership (120), finding answers in the poem's publication history (its inclusion of the Thyrza lyrics).

Franklin, Caroline. "'My Hope Was to Bring Forth Heroes': The Two Foscari and the Fostering of Masculine Virtú by [a] Stoical Heroine." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 163-80.

Franklin, Caroline. "The Ups and Downs of the Don." Rev. of Byron's "Don Juan" and the Don Juan Legend, by Moyra Haslett. TLS (Dec. 5, 1997): 26.

Gleckner, Robert F., and Bernard Beatty, eds. The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays. Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997.

Essays, some previously published, by Erdman, Kelsall, Knight, A. B. England, Christensen, McGann, Manning, Franklin, Wolfson, Eggenschweller, Hirst, McVeigh, Roston, Richardson, Robinson, and Watkins.

Goldweber, David E. "Byron, Catholicism, and Don Juan XVII." Renascence 49.3 (1997): 175-89.

Agrees with Bernard Beatty that the poem progresses towards "optimistic, albeit cautionary, faithfulness" (175) and his faithfulness is "a Catholic Christian one." Aurora is Byron's idealization of Catholicism (182).

Goode, Clement T. George Gordon, Lord Byron: A Comprehensive, Annotated Research Bibliography of Secondary Materials in English, 1973-1994. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow P, 1997.

Grimes, Kyle. "William Hone, John Murray, and the Uses of Byron." In Romanticism, Radicalism, and the Press, ed. Stephen C. Behrendt and Harriet Kramer Linkin (Detroit: Wayne State UP, 1997): 192-202.

Gross, Jonathan D., ed. Byron's "Corbeau Blanc": The Life & Letters of Lady Melbourne, 1751-1818. Houston: Rice UP, 1997.

Grosskurth, Phyllis. Byron: The Flawed Angel. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.

Haslett, Moyra. Byron's "Don Juan" and the Don Juan Legend. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1997.

Hawkins, Ann Rachelle. "Order, Community, and Astarte: Revising Shakespeare in Byron's Manfred (William Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Poetry)." [Doctoral dissertation, U of Kentucky, 1997], DAI, Vol. 58-09A (1997): 3537.

This dissertation suggests that the figure of Astarte in Byron's Manfred was inspired by intertextual as well as biographical sources. Hawkins looks at the relationship between Manfred and its Renaissance forebears, considering Shakespeare's Macbeth and The Tempest as sources for Byron's use of the magus, spirit realms, and destinies, and Hamlet as an inspiration for Manfred's soliloquies. Hawkins views Astarte as a reflection of "the relationship between the male-self and the female-other in the search for peace or reconciliation." Manfred is not so much a self-indulgent expression of Romantic angst as "a philosophical response to and profound expression of man's need for community."

Holland, Tom. Slave of My Thirst. New York: Pocket Books, 1997.

A novel based on Byron's life.

Holmes, Daryl Yvonne. "Byron's Women and Their Fictional Counterparts." [Doctoral dissertation, U of Southwestern Louisiana, 1997].

Huber, Werner. "Dead Poets Society: Byron, Postmodernism, and the Biographical Mode." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 75-90.

Discusses Amanda Prantera's Conversations with Lord Byron on Perversion, 163 Years after His Lordship's Death (1987) in light of the charge that biography is a "morally suspect genre" (76).

Ingersoll, Earl G. "Byron's Don Juan and the Postmodern." Forum for Modern Language Studies 33.4 (1997): 302-10.

Isaac, Peter. "Byron's Publisher and His 'Spy': Constancy and Change Among John Murray II's Printers, 1812-1831." The Library 19 (1997): 1-24.

Discusses printers used to publish the works of Austen, de Staël, and Byron. Thomas Davison, printer of the first two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and other poems, earned his reputation by producing Scott's Arabian Nights (1811). Corrects emphasis of Smiles' biography of John Murray II; original archival research.

Jones, Christine Kenyon. "James Holmes and the Byron Circle." BJ 25 (1997): 83-88.

Karagjozi, Afrim. "The Albanian Byron." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 21-37.

Karagjozi discusses the Albanians' influence on Byron, the Albanian character in Byron's works, and Byron's influence on attracting such artists as Edward Lear, Léon Gérome, and Captain Poer Beresford to Albanian subjects.

Kelsall, Malcolm. "Byron and Wordsworth: European Cosmopolitanism and English Provincialism." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 91-103.

"This paper is a supplement to an essay contributed to the special issue on Romanticism and cultural history of Litteraria Pragensia in 1993." Kelsall explores the words "lake" and "ocean" as they represent a "sense of place" and "cosmopolitanism" respectively (92). He links the Wordsworthian and Byronic voices by examining Wordsworth's "The Solitary" (inspired by Voltaire), Byron's evocation of Lake Leman, and Byron's response to the "Prospectus" to the "Excursion." Kelsall draws interesting connections between sections of Childe Harold IV and Wordsworth's "She Was a Phantom of Delight," between the monastic ruins of Norman Abbey in Byron and the "stately House" in the "Excursion." "It is an indication of the complexity of this inner tension in Byron--his sense of proximity to Wordsworth's experience--that the attack on the Lakers in the Dedication of Don Juan was eventually suppressed. The poem (ultimately) comes to recognise a common object of desire: to return to a spiritual home" (101).

Kelsall, Malcolm. "Venice Preserved." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 33-68.

King, Valerie. The Poet's Kiss. New York: Kensington Publishing, 1997.

"The famous poet Lord Byron kissed Emily Longcliffe's wrist and gave her a secret message that leads her to a roguish rakehell named Kingsbridge who could help her find her cousin. Now, with Kingsbridge by her side, Emily begins to feel passionate longings she never knew existed. But will Kingsbridge continue to aid her cause without demanding payment in return? Or will he demand the complete surrender of her heart? A Regency romance original."

Knight, G. Wilson. "'Agonized Self-Conflict': Marino Faliero." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 69-87.

Knight, G. Wilson. "'Simple' and 'Bright': Sardanapalus." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 181-201.

LaChance, Charles. "Nihilism, Love, and Genre in Don Juan." KSR 11 (1997): 141-66.

LaChance argues that Peter Manning, Anne Mellor, Robert Gleckner, Jerome McGann, Jerome Christensen, Terence Hoagwood, Stuart Curran, and others have misread "Byron's nihility," confusing it with "liberal sentimentality or materialistic naturalism" (141). "This burlesque romance [Don Juan]--which paradoxically is gothically lewd--envisions the world as a lethally sexy hellhole in the form of a female lover. Such a lover is the irresistible pit Juan tumbles into en route to nihilism" (164).

Langford, Jeffrey. "The Byronic Berlioz: Harold en Italie and Beyond." Journal of Musicological Research 16.3 (1997): 199-221.

Lewis, Kevin. "Hibernia: Happenings; Dracula Still Has Us by the Throat." Irish America (Apr. 30, 1997): 23.

Discusses how Byron inspired Polidori's "The Vampyre."

Lloyd-Jones, Ralph. "His Life or His Living: Byron's Friend Bland." BJ 25 (1997): 89-101.

Mack, Anne, and Jay Rome. "Marxism, Romanticism, and Postmodernism." In Dialogue and Critical Discourse: Language, Culture, Critical Theory, ed. Michael Macovski (New York: Oxford UP, 1997): 174-92.

Cast in the form of a dialogue between Prof. J. and Prof. M., this article focuses on Byron's "Fare Thee Well!" and discusses the impact of McGann's Marxism and his response to de Man's critical practice. McGann's work presents "allegories--extended figures--of his social subject, the social text" (181).

 

MacKay, Mary Alice. "Sketch Club Drawings for Byron's 'Darkness' and Scott's 'Lay of the Last Minstrel.'" Master Drawings 35.2 (1997): 142-54.

Macovski, Michael. "'The Bard I Quote From': Byron, Bakhtin, and the Appropriation of Voices." In Dialogue and Critical Discourse: Language, Culture, Critical Theory, ed. Michael Macovski (New York: Oxford UP, 1997): 158-73.

McDayter, Ghislaine. "'What Do I Know of Vampires?': Byron, Diodati, and the Reproduction of Desire." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 127-47.

McGann, Jerome J. "'Studiously Greek': The Two Foscari." In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 133-51.

Meyer, Sandy. The Strange Journey of Byron & Cyros: Exploratory Guide. Park City, NJ: Wood-in-the-Round Publishers, 1997.

Michael, Jean Catherine Vincent. "Shrines and Sacred Architecture in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (Lord Byron)." [Doctoral dissertation, City U of New York, 1997], DAI, Vol. 58-09A (1997): 3539.

"This dissertation demonstrates the importance of Byron's thematic usage of shrines and sacred architecture in the autobiographical Childe Harold's Pilgrimage." Michael invokes Donald Howard's theory of secular pilgrimage to compare Byron's comprehensive vision with Dante's and Michelangelo's. Michael takes issue with Shelley, Peacock, and critic Charles Robinson in their view that Byron's canto 4 of Childe Harold is nihilistic. The final chapter of this study examines the final cantos of Don Juan as a satire on Anglican architecture and explores how Byron made a shrine of himself by serving in the Greek War of Independence.

Morgan, Angela. "Byronism Undermined. . ." History Today 47.10 (1997): 33-34.

Neff, D. S. "Manfred and the Mac-Ivors." ANQ 10 (1997): 24-29.

Para, J. B. "On the Ruins of Missolonghi (From Byron to Delacroix, Poets and Painters Have Drawn Inspiration from This Place)." Europe Revue Litteraire Mensuelle 75.813 (1997): 240-42.

Paulin, Roger. "Some Remarks on the Occasion of the New Edition of the Works of Wilhelm Muller." MLR 92 (1997): 363-78.

"People, Places: The Season's Nonfiction Books Brim with Human Drama." Maclean's (June 23, 1997): 60-61.

Poole, Roger. "What Constitutes, and What Is External to, the 'Real' Text of Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage: A Romaunt and Other Poems (1812)?" In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell, 149-207. Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997.

Poole argues that Childe Harold is a "four-part text, of a peculiarly modern kind, in that all the four parts of the text inter-relate in a way which we can only call inter-textual" (150).

Prapassaree, Jeffrey Kramer. "Stoppard's Arcadia: Research, Time, Loss." Modern Drama, 40 (1997): 1-10.

Prochàzka, Martin. "Byron and Romantic Nationalism in Central Europe: The Case of Czechs and Slovaks." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 55-74.

The Czech revivalists worried that their most promising young poet, Karle Hynek Mácha, would follow Byron in his "excessive criticisms of Czech nationalism" (64). Publication of Mácha's chief work, the verse tale May, triggered debate concerning the "philosophical and ideological effects of Byronism" (65). Mácha was criticized as a follower of Byron and Hegel; his poetry was a direct "threat to the revivalist notions of culture and nationhood" (65). This essay seeks to show "how literature as a democratic institution can always resist the ideological manipulation of social life" (73).

Charting Josef Kajetán Tyl's (1808-1852) response to Byron in a satiric story titled Rozervanec (The Distracted Man, 1840), as well as the divergent responses of the "Left" and Orthodox Hegelians, Procházka shows that Czech nationalists did not reject Byron on the grounds of religious orthodoxy; for Tyl, Byronism represents a form of self-love which must be submerged in the greater cause of "the folk."

Raizis, M. Byron. "Byron's Greece: Ancient and Contemporary." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 39-54.

Raizis discusses Harold Nicolson's, William Hazlitt's, William Lisle Bowles', and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's responses to Byron's Philhellenism.

Roessel, David Ernest. "In Byron's Shadow: Modern Greece in English and American Literature from 1831 to 1914." [Doctoral dissertation, Princeton U, 1997], DAI, Vol. 58-01A, 0175.

This dissertation charts the history of modern Greece in English and American imaginative literature from its creation in the Romantic period until the start of the First World War. Roessel argues that Byron played a key role in fashioning modern conceptions of Greece. Due in large part to Byron's influence, "modern Greece was depicted in a state of evolution from the degradation of Turkish tyranny toward a revival of the golden era of the Classical past. This accounts for the general lack of interest in the actual development and politics of the Kingdom of Greece, a monarchy with a rather conservative Orthodox Christian clergy, and the continuation of the idea that liberation of more Greeks from the Turks would start a politically and socially (if not pagan) progressive movement both in Greece and beyond. Greece was persistently depicted as a politicized place, the site of battles over slavery and of East against West."

Sider, Sandra. "Bibliographic Note: 'Provenance Note: Womanly Accomplishments' (Tracing the Signature on the Flyleaf of the Pierpont Morgan Library Copy of Hebrew Melodies)." Rare Books & Manuscripts Librarianship 12 (1997): 35-36.

Simpson, Michael. "Byron's Cain at the Barbicon Centre, London (29th Nov. 1995 to 7th March 1996)." ERR 8 (1997): 41-46.

Tessiére, Thèrése. "Byron and the French Romantics." In Lord Byron the European: Essays from the International Byron Society, ed. Richard Cardwell (Lewiston, NY: Edward Mellen, 1997): 1-20.

Tessiére notes that France discovered Byron through English editions published by the Galignani brothers in their bookstore in the rue Vivienne, and through Amédée Pichot's prose translation, which made Byron's "works accessible to all classes of readers and soon became a standard text of reference" (6). If Stendhal and Mérimée were inspired by Byron's Turkish Tales and Childe Harold (7), Victor Hugo (Hernani) and Gérard de Nerval were inspired by the phenomenon of Byronism (9), as were Lamartine, Vigny, and Musset. Tessiére discusses Madame Louise Swanton-Belloc's "first book-length study of Byron," published in 1830; Benjamin Laroche's scholarly translation (1836-37), which ran to seven editions; and Byron's influence on Georges Sand, Alexandre Dumas, Hector Berlioz, and Théodore Géricault.

Vail, Jeffery. "'The Bright Sun Was Extinguish'd': The Bologna Prophecy and Byron's 'Darkness.'" WC 28.3 (1997): 183-92.

Valine, Luis Antonio de. El Burdel de Lord Byron: Una Novela Lirica. Barcelona: Planeta, 1997.

Wandling, Timothy John. "Byron, Agency, and Transgressive Eloquence: The Fate of Readers in Nineteenth Century British Literature (Lord Byron)." [Doctoral dissertation, Stanford U, 1997], DAI, Vol. 58-09A (1997): 3543.

Examines the impact of Byron on nineteenth-century readers. Initial chapter explores the fate of Byronic eloquence and examines the role of John Stuart Mill and other theorists in shaping conceptions of literary propriety; examines Percy and Mary Shelley's responses to Byron in The Masque of Anarchy and Frankenstein in terms of the relationship between authors and "real audience." The second half of this study focuses on Chartist and socialist literature; explores how Byronic eloquence affected the Chartist writer Thomas Cooper, "and discusses the way Charles Kingsley re-figures Cooper as a quietest poet in Alton Locke." William Morris and Thomas Hardy share with Byron an aesthetic of eloquence that "seeks to instigate in real readers politically transgressive responses."

Wilner, Joshua. "Drinking Rules! Byron and Baudelaire." Diacritics 27.3 (1997): 34-48.

Traces allusions to drinking in both poets; responds positively to Christensen's Lord Byron's Strength. A version of a paper formerly given at MLA in 1995.

Wilson, Frances, ed. Byromania: Portraits of the Artist in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Culture. Basingstoke and New York: Macmillan/St. Martin's P, 1997.

Wolfson, Susan J. "'A Problem Few Dare Imitate': Sardanapalus and 'Effeminate Character.'" In The Plays of Lord Byron: Critical Essays, ed. Robert Gleckner and Bernard Beatty (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1997): 201-32.


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